Herefordshire Jewish Community Newsletter October/November 2015

Editorial

Now we have passed the end of the High Holydays, we embark on a new phase in the year. We have been reviewing and re-focussing ourselves, especially our inner selves as we have been through the intense period between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, and the ‘Day of Atonement’ itself. We start the New Year with new clarity and new intentions. Now we come to Succoth, where one of our tasks is to sit in a Succah, or temporary dwelling, to remind ourselves how we were once tent dwellers and wanderers. In present times, we cannot but also think of the many refugees who have no option but to live in tents, and so our lives turn to social action and our contributions to the communities in which we live.

One of the messages from Yom Kippur this year has been that we have to live both these parts of our lives to the best of our ability: reflecting on our actions as individuals, but also taking action out in the world to do what we can to create the world in which we want to live, both for ourselves and others.

Julian Brown

In this edition:

Bible week Limmud in the Woods

Community events: Rededication ceremony High Holyday services

Peace Day Event London Klezmer Quartet visit

CHAIR CHAT

CEMETERY REDEDICATION, SUNDAY SPTEMBER

It was good to see all the stones back in their rightful position and it was wonderful to have Susan Moore (formerly Kirkhope, one of the founder members of HJC) who could tell us more about the people who were buried there. We were surprised to find one unmarked grave there and we have already made enquiries to the cemetery authorities to see what we can do to rectify this. Julian led prayers for us at the cemetery before we all went back to Saxon Hall for a cup of tea before our Erev Rosh Hashanah service.

HIGH HOLYDAY SERVICES.

We held both of these this year at Saxon Hall in Hereford, which will probably now become our new base in Hereford, as it has excellent facilities. We can also keep an eye on how the “Anne Frank” tree is doing. Many thanks to Julian for leading the Kol Nidrei service and for some effective shofar blowing.

SIMCHAT TORAH SERVICE.

My favourite of the year and a welcome return to Rabbi Anna. We had a great service last year and I’m sure this year will be no different. Please make every effort to come along to the Bridges Centre in Monmouth at 7 p.m. (Post code of Bridges for those who haven’t been there before is NP25 5AS).

HJC COUNCIL

I have to say that it has been a bit of a struggle to keep going! We are all very much missing Andrea who knew where everything was and was very much the lynchpin of the community. We’re delighted to hear that her health has improved and look forward to welcoming her back to our services shortly. Meanwhile, we are soon going to have to say good bye to Steve Lavender who is moving to Cardiff and would like to thank him for all the help he has given us. We wish a speedy recovery to Hanna Wine who is convalescing in London. Alison Turner has kindly agreed to take on the role of interim treasurer. So our Council is now very thin on the ground. If anyone would like to join us, please let me know!

Mark Walton

Peace Day Service Sunday 20th September 2015, Hereford Cathedral

On Sunday 20th September, as an observance of The international Day of Peace (on Monday 21st September), the Herefordshire interfaith Group held a Peace service at Hereford Cathedral. The service started with candle lighting by representatives of the different faith groups gathered. The service included music and readings from 8 faiths or more, also including a Jewish contribution (reading on Peace from Rabbi John Rayner, and singing of Lo Yisa Goy – Nation shall not lift up sword against nation) led by Julian and myself. In all, this was a lovely event, which felt open and inclusive, and the Interfaith group are hoping to hold more events over the coming year.

Cherry Wolfe

Summer Events

A Report on Jewish Christian Bible Week 2015

In August this year, I attended the 47th International Jewish Christian Bible Week at Haus Ohrbeck near Osnabrueck in Germany. My first experience of this rather unique gathering was in 2006 – and since then I have returned to it six times. Bible Week is the sort of thing that people go back to – sometimes year after year. What is so special about it?

It was founded in 1968 by Rabbi Jonathan Magonet, then a young rabbinic student, together with some older Catholic sisters. They were no doubt inspired by that huge shift in the Church’s attitude to Jews, marked by the publication of Vatican encyclical Nostra Aestate. From then onwards, for more than 40 years, Jews and Christians from Germany, England, the Netherlands, Israel, the USA and other countries have been coming together each summer to study biblical texts against the background of the two traditions. Rabbi Magonet later became the Principal of Leo Baeck College, and among those who come from UK, there is always a contingent who have connections of one sort or other with Leo Baeck. Rabbi Jonathan, now retired and a grandfather, continues to play a key role in Bible Week. From the playful exercise on the first evening to accustom us to the theme (and each other), through his sermon at the Sabbath liturgy, to the singing on the last night of three special songs fiercely prescribed by custom, his is a presiding presence.

However, the day to day running and leadership of the event is managed by a highly competent team which is also representative of the diverse participants. Each year, one particular book from the Hebrew scriptures is taken as the subject of study in the groups that take place every morning for five days. This year there were 11 of such groups, and each participant is attached to one of them. The tasks of the groups range from ‘Intensive study of the Hebrew Text’, through to a ‘Creative response to the text through Visual (or other) arts’. And then there’s also the Children’s group.

A Children’s group? Why on earth would there be one of those in a gathering apparently devoted to such studious pursuits? The fact is that Bible Week is not quite what it seems from the label. In many ways, it’s more like a huge house party where you meet up each year with friends – people active in their professions and communities, older people including some of the very old, younger ones including young families (and even some teenagers) to discuss, argue, play and celebrate together in a well established way – also remembering those who have passed on, and welcoming those who have joined us for the first time. In fact, there are always newcomers. This year more people applied than ever before. 136 people attended, with ages ranging from 4 months to 80 years, but still there was a waiting list, and someone who had to drop out at the last minute could straight away be replaced.

But what of the text? This year our text was Qohelet (Ecclesiastes), one of the five Megillot and a book which in many ways sits oddly in the Hebrew canon. Its writer seems not at all to engage with the God of Abraham and Isaac, who delivered Israel from Egypt, and is zealous for the keeping of his covenant. Was Qohelet then a world-weary sage for whom ‘everything is vanity/futility’ and ‘there is nothing new under the sun’ ? For whom God is a distant and passive ‘elohim’ unconcerned with any human affairs? Or is he someone who is subtly mocking the worldly wisdom and popular philosophy of the early Hellenistic age, and at last affirms that, although God’s purpose for us is ultimately unknowable, ‘the sum of the matter, when all is said and done, is to revere God and keep his commandments’?

These were the kind of questions that we discussed in our groups, and they were also addressed in the three main lectures, one by a Jewish scholar, one by a Christian scholar, and one who is chosen only in relation to their special expertise in the text of this year. The opinions of the scholars at these three lectures are always respectfully listened to, but it is by no means only they who have a chance to speak. Most afternoons and some evenings, anyone is free to offer a ‘Speaker’s Corner’ topic or some ‘Fringe’ entertainment, and many do so. Nor is it only those with intellectual or scholarly contributions who get a chance to shine. Musical, artistic or comic talents are much in demand – specially at the Apodosis (concluding concert & talent show) on the last night.

This aim of making everyone feel included seems to be the hallmark of Bible Week, whether it’s keeping a balance between Jewish or Christian, German or English speaking, women and men, Catholic and Protestant, young and old. With all these to include, the weekends are liturgically rich, and sometimes a trifle overwhelming! But there is also a beauty about the harmonious interfaith cooperation and mutual respect, which I have rarely seen elsewhere. The majority of Jews present are from the progressive wings of Judaism, but those with a more Orthodox orientation are also catered for. All food for the week is vegetarian, but at least one family has stricter requirements in respect of food – and the kitchen is well able to cope with special diets, whether kosher or lactose free!

There is no doubt that Bible Week has been in some sense constructed around Rabbi Jonathan, his unique vision and teaching capacity. Yet, in one of the songs he composed – and is never allowed not to sing every year at the Apodosis – he affectionately honours the memory of those Catholic sisters who were his fellow founders. ‘Who is bound and who is free?’ goes its poignant refrain, gently suggesting that those who chose to live a ‘restricted’ life of religious commitment, may have something important to teach about the nature of real freedom.

But when all is said and done (to borrow a phrase from Qohelet) it is somehow, by an unspoken consensus, the Jews who are the hosts at this unique event, even in (perhaps specially in) its distinctive inclusivity. Here on German soil, where Jews were brutally driven out to their deaths more than 50 years ago, descendants of the survivors now offer a very particular kind of hospitality to those who come in order to learn, to understand the lessons of that history, and to share with each other the search for wisdom in our traditions.

Angela West

Limmud in the Woods

Over August Bank holiday weekend, myself, my wife Cherry, and our daughter Maya attended Limmud in the Woods, which is the only event of the many organised by the Limmud Jewish Education movement, which is held under canvas, and for that reason also creates a stronger community of it’ s members, than perhaps other larger Limmud events. For four days we camped in a lovely setting – a large open space, which indeed was surrounded by woods, which also played a part in some of the events that took place over the period. Each member of the impromptu Limmud community was also asked to contribute 4 hours of their time over the 4 days towards maintaining the camp and doing necessary chores from putting up fences, or setting up floodlights in the woods, to chopping spring onions for salad for 120 people.

The programme is as varied as you could imagine, from sessions on the environment, Jewish meditation, and T’ai Chi, to study of biblical Text, kashrut, wild and edible plants, and of course debate on the Middle East and Israel. So there is always something to suit all tastes and levels of Jewish interest and orthodoxy. This is one of the wonderful things about Limmud in that it can hold within its format a wide range of Jewish practice, as well as cater for all ages and backgrounds.

Workshops run all day from early morning running or yoga sessions at 8 a.m., through to 6 p.m. when there is dinner, and, although it is tempting to go for a walk in the woods, or just spend time reading by your tent, I found that most days I was keen to attend my full complement of sessions. As usual, the only difficulty with Limmud is being sure you’ve made the right choice of session when each one has something of particular interest. Do I go to a workshop on a novel Israeli approach to developing communication in communities , or a session on Literature and poetry? Feeling what is right for you at any moment of the day is an important task.

One of the most inspiring workshops, for all of us in my family was one which ran over two sessions given by a young woman, Sara Moon, who had cycled from the UK (Sheffield) to the West Bank (admittedly, taking boats for two parts of the journey), which was a particular mission of hers, socially , environmentally and politically. It was clear from her talk that she was very keen to develop her knowledge, experience and engagement both with the Palestinians who lived on the West Bank, and with whom she picked olives, and with the Israelis, where she wanted to find out more about her Jewish roots and history. The cycle journey, from which she showed us some wonderful photos, was very much a journey of discovery for her, and one in which she received such kindness and support from people along the way, that it was also a story of humanity.

To return to the picture of Limmud, two further elements need to be mentioned. The evening entertainment was also a novel experience in many ways. From bonfires, to a Ceilidh, to an impromptu discussion café, and a late night ’silent disco’ as well as further talks and films, there was always a choice. One of the least expected and yet most enjoyable for me was the silent disco, DJ’d by the ‘Rebbetsen’ , where you listened to music through a set of headphones, and could dance to the music if you wished, but if you took the headphones off there was blissful silence, and you could sip a drink from the bar either in musical or quiet mood.

Finally, no report of Limmud event such as this would be complete without reference to the unique Shabbat experience. From the alternative musical progressive evening service held in a stepped mini amphitheatre in the woods, to the first ever Limmud attempt to combine liberal/reform and orthodox services into one, for the Shabbat morning service, this was definitely something different. Before Havdalah many of sat out under the darkening skies singing niggunim (wordless melodies) until it was time for the ceremony. Shabbat gave you a chance to socialise more with others, when the pace of the day was less, but only slightly less frantic than other days in the camp.

If you can cope with the camping, and would like a Limmud where the numbers are much smaller than Limmud conference or even one day events, I would recommend this as a true learning experience, after which you may never quite see the associations of being Jewish in the same way as before.

Julian Brown

Hereford Cemetery Stones

Following our rededication of gravestones at Hereford Cemetery pre-Rosh Hashanah, Susan Moore has kindly sent in information she gave us during the ceremony re past members of the community. Perhaps we can build on this to create a community history archive. There will be more on this in the next edition of HJC newsletter.

:

1 HJC members at rededication ceremony

Markers and gravestones in Jewish section, Hereford Cemetery

Rabbi Bernard Hooker

When we started The Herefordshire Jewish Community, Rabbi Hooker and his wife Eileen had retired to Ledbury. He was born in London in 1922 and trained at Jews’ college. He was the youngest Chaplain to be appointed to the Armed Forces serving on the Rhine and in the Middle East. He later served as Minister to the Birmingham Progressive Synagogue and the Wembley Liberal Synagogue until in 1965 he was invited to become the Spiritual Leader of the Jewish Community in Jamaica. Whilst there, he wrote many books, serving the community for 10 years.

On his return to London he became Minister of the North London Progressive Synagogue and was a Vice President of the ULPS for many years.

He was a marvellous support for us giving much advice on starting and running the group and leading services ourselves. He conducted many of our High Holy Day, and Seder Services.

Marion and Gerald Weisbloom

Marion and Gerald lived in Malvern and joined the group shortly after it started. They were friendly and enthusiastic members, working on the Committee and often offering the use of their home for meetings and services. They both had a love of music and also for walking. A small group of us had many an enjoyable “Sunday Ramble” usually ending at a Public House for lunch! After Marion’s death Gerry served as Chairman of the Community.

Max and Ilsa Conu

Max and Ilsa joined the Group from the first meeting. They were both older members and retired – I believe Max had had and Engineering Business in Hereford. Ilsa came to many of the services and they were both particularly pleased and enthusiastic for the provision of the Cemetery area!

Ilsa enjoyed playing Bridge and had been a member of the Bowls Club. She also enjoyed Horse Racing and indeed her “wake” was held at the Racecourse.

Joseph Collard

I know little about him, as his wife Miriam was the member of the Community and would come with their daughter Yudit. Miriam once appeared on Mastermind! The funeral service was conducted by (then Student Rabbi) Janet Burden who many of us knew, with the ashes later interred at Hereford.

Josephine and George Waldren

Again they were very early members and supporters of the Community, but already well on in years by the time it started. I don’t think they had any children.

Irvine Rose

Irvine Rose had lived for many years in Hereford and although retired when I met him, he had had a hairdressing salon in the city. He did remember a much earlier Orthodox Jewish group in Hereford which died out because of lack of members. He helped us a lot with the Hebrew prayers, and he was survived by his son (Michael I think).

David Springer

Many of you will remember David who served as our Chairman for many years from the beginning of the Community. He was a wonderful and friendly person with a huge enthusiasm for the Group. He had lived in Hereford since 1969 and was one of the first people to respond to Josephine’s advertisement in 1991, coming with his cousin to the first meeting in December. David used his particular strengths to work for the Community, not least being in obtaining all the items needing for our Passover celebrations, travelling to London and Birmingham as necessary. His wife Mary did and still does all the cooking for these wonderful evenings. David had a Music Shop in Hereford and used his considerable keyboard skills in making cassettes of the traditional Jewish melodies so that we could learn them and sing them in our services. He also took upon himself the compiling and reading out of the names of loved ones in the memorial service on Kol Nidre. Committee meetings with David were great fun with lots of jokes. He came to rest in the Jewish Cemetery far too early.

Marcelle Greenbaum

We were contacted by Social Services when Marcelle was placed in a small self managed group home near Malvern. She was Jewish by birth but following a road accident in London had suffered a brain injury and had been placed by her family in a Mental Institution, which was then closed. She loved coming to our meetings, especially ones held in our homes, and hearing songs remembered from her youth. She was a sweet person but we never met any of her family. It is a shame that her grave is not marked in any way, and perhaps a small subscription could be raised by the Community to pay for a simple marker.

Contributed by Susan Moore (formerly Kirkhope)

Hereford Food Bank

We are still collecting for Hereford and Malvern Food Banks at all services.

Please buy just one extra item from this list and leave it at our collection point.

Items requested by Hereford Food Bank are:

  • Tins: Meat – hot or cold; vegetables; fruit; rice pudding.
  • Dry goods: Smash potato; rice; powdered custard; dried milk; instant coffee; sugar.
  • General: UHT milk; pasta sauce; jam; marmalade; instant/microwave meals.
  • Hygiene: Shampoo; toothpaste; soap; household cleaners e.g. washing up liquid, detergent.

Thank you. Any queries please contact them on 01432 353347

 

Welfare

We wish Alan Toffel a good recovery. Alan came to our Rosh Hashanah service, and has been staying in Hereford since then, through a period of illness.

There’s still chance to donate to our

HJC Charity High Holyday Appeal

Our two charities for this year are:

St Michael’s Hospice, Hereford (http://www.st-michaels-hospice.org.uk/)

and Children of Peace (charity for Israel & Middle East https://www.childrenofpeace.org.uk/)

We are also making additional donations this year in aid of refugees to Medecins sans Frontieres.

Please send your donations for this to our interim Treasurer – Alison Turner

Forthcoming Events

Limmud Conference – Birmingham, 27 – 31 December 2015

When? Limmud Conference will be taking place from Sunday 27 to Thursday 31 December 2015. It will be preceded by Limmud Shabbat from Friday 25 to Saturday 26 December. We look forward to you joining us there!

Where? The hotels surrounding Pendigo Lake, just outside Birmingham, UK. More detailed information on our exciting new site can be found by visiting the frequently asked questions page. See: http://limmud.org/conference/

South West Regional Shabbaton Communities involved will include Bristol, Gloucestershire, Oxford, Reading, Wessex and Herefordshire.

LIBERAL JUDAISM SOUTH WEST REGIONAL SHABBATON A relaxing day of Jewish learning, services and community Saturday 28th November 2015, 10am to 6pm Jury’s Inn, Swindon, Fleming Way, SN1 2NG. For full details see poster attached to your email. Early booking if possible and no later than 20 November, please. We will try to coordinate travel for HJC members wishing to attend.

HJC are actively participating in planning of this event, so we hope that as many members as possible will be able to attend the day. Previous Shabbatons have been thoroughly enjoyed by all who have attended.

Book online: www.tunyurl.com/southwestshabbaton

Or call Aaron Abraham at Liberal Judaism on 0207 631 9830

London Klezmer Quartet –Bridges Centre, Monmouth, Saturday 5th December@7.30 p.m. This is one of the premier Klezmer groups in the country, and we are lucky that they will be playing relatively locally. This should be a wonderful evening, so do save the date.

Tickets (£15) from Mark Walton or available online (see below):

 http://www.wyevalleymusic.org.uk/tckts_online.html

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 November

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 wds, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Friday 2nd October

Simchat Torah Service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

7 p.m.

Bridges Centre, Monmouth NP25 5AS

Saturday 24th October

Shabbat Service, Lech Lecha, led by Student Rabbi Igor Zinkov

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall WR13 6HJ

Sat 21st November

Shabbat Service, led by Julian Brown. This will be a service focussing on Hebrew and learning.

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

WR13 6HJ

Saturday 12th December

Chanukah service and party, led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

3 p.m.

Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Other Events of Interest

Saturday 28 November

South West Regional Shabbaton

www.tunyurl.com/southwestshabbaton

10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Jury’s Inn, Swindon

SN1 2NG

Saturday 5 December

London Klezmer Quarter performance,

7.30 p.m.

Bridges Centre, Monmouth. NP25 5AS

Herefordshire Jewish Community Newsletter August/September 2015

Editorial

We will soon be approaching the High Holydays, but before that we have the month of Elul which is traditionally a time of reflection and introspection, in preparation for the New Year and Yom Kippur. As well as reflecting on our own deeds over the past year, this year, we also have a duty to think about others. For the first time, for this month of August, Liberal and Reform Judaism have linked up with the Council for Christians and Jews (CCJ) in a joint initiative entitled ‘If not now, when?’ This encourages us to take action on the persecution of Christian communities in the Middle East, which is sadly currently taking place in dramatic fashion, and which reminds us of the persecution we have similarly have encountered in previous times. I recently read an interview with one Christian refugee fleeing from persecution (and there will surely be others) who was amongst those in the so called migrant camp at Calais, so we need to remember that each person in the camp has a story, and remember also that many of our community are descended from refugees to this country.

Looking ahead to the HJC calendar for the next few months, we have a wide variety of activities to take part in – social, cultural and educational, as well as services. This year we are taking part in the South West small communities Shabbaton in November, which will include a day of workshops, talks, and activities which should have something to suit all members, and we hope to have a contingent attending from HJC. We can also look forward to a performance in Monmouth by London Klezmer Quartet in December, which, while not sponsored by HJC, will surely be an event we might like to attend. Finally, at this time of review, we are always looking for different ideas for activities within our own community, so if you have a particular interest which you think may suit other HJC members, let us know.

Julian Brown

In this edition:

Chair Chat Anne Frank Day Danny Rich Service

Month of Reflection Book Review Hereford Food Bank

Etgar Keret –Israeli Essayist Forthcoming Events

CHAIR CHAT

NEW LJ SIDDUR

There is a regular LJ Chair email forum which I rarely contribute to. However, I did join in this one as there seemed to be a growing feeling that we didn’t really need another siddur, it would be expensive and time consuming to produce and costly for small communities to replace their existing siddurim. Some communities said they actually preferred the Reform siddur and I suggested that if there was to be a new one then it should be a joint progressive undertaking between LJ and the Reform movement so that it could be used by congregations in both organisations, combining the best elements from both traditions. I also personally prefer the Reform siddur with translations and explanations of the rationale and origin of certain prayers on the same page. It was suggested that my proposal would never be accepted as a combined prayer book would be seen as the “thin end of the wedge” in encouraging a merger between the two organisations. What would be the problem with that? Which leads into …..

REFORM MOVEMENT AND PATRILINEALITY

Very encouraging that the Reform rabbis are seriously considering this which is now the only outstanding doctrinal difference between the two movements. See, http://news.reformjudaism.org.uk/press-releases/reform-rabbis-balance-tradition-and-welcome.html

There is also an interesting clip on the subject of patrilineality on the BBC website of a discussion between Reform Rabbi Jonathan Romain and Dr Yaakov Wise representing orthodoxy – no meeting of minds between the two!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b062hn6n

Is there any logical reason now for the two movements not to combine to form one strong and influential Progressive voice?

Mark Walton

Anne Frank Day

Members of Herefordshire Jewish Community were privileged to take part in a joint interfaith celebration/commemoration on the theme of ‘courage’ to mark Anne Frank day on Friday 12th June, in order to remember children who have been killed through war and conflict, as well as to commemorate the courage of all those who have given their service to protect our own rights and freedoms in recent times.

Both Christian and Jewish services contributed to the atmosphere of the occasion, as more than 70 people gathered outside the Community centre to see the garden of remembrance, the tree planted in honour of Anne Frank, and the unveiling of a plaque in honour of Anne Frank and other children. It felt a very unified occasion with both Reverend Philip Brown and Rabbis Danny Rich and Anna Gerrard leading thoughtful and moving prayers to mark the occasion. It was wonderful to see so many representatives of Hereford City, Church, ex-service personnel and community organisations, praying together with members of the Jewish community. Singing by teenagers from a local school as well as bugle playing added to the sense of the occasion.

The services were followed by a magnificent tea in Saxon Hall. This gave everyone an opportunity to socialise as well as to see the photographic exhibition on the life of Anne Frank, and watch a video presentation of the development of the remembrance garden. Presentations were made to members of Hereford College who had worked on the creation of the garden.

The final part of the day was a Friday evening Erev Shabbat service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard of Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish Community and Rabbi Danny Rich, Chief executive of Liberal Judaism. A smaller number of Christian visitors joined in with this service together with members of Hereford Jewish Community. In addition, everyone seemed to be both surprised and impressed by the impromptu question and answer session offered by Rabbi Danny Rich. This covered a wide variety of aspects of Jewish faith, including the different strands of Judaism, the origins of Liberal and progressive Judaism, women Rabbis, our relationship with the Five Books of Moses, and attitudes to Israel.

In all, this was a very worthwhile occasion and shows what can be achieved through cooperation of many disparate groups and interests who have a shared vision and purpose. Hereford Jewish Community are very grateful to Centre Manager, Victoria Craig and Chair of Trustees, Peter Cocks for their commitment and enormous hard work in organising this event.

Julian Brown

Shabbat Service 11 July with Rabbi Danny Rich

Due to illness in Marc Turner’s family, the naming ceremony for baby Isaac had to be postponed. However despite this, Rabbi Danny Rich was still kind enough to lead a service for us in Hereford Scout Hut which around 14 of us attended. The venue was a welcome change in a pleasant setting.

The parasha for the week was Pinchas. As usual Danny had much to say on a range of topics. He began by talking about Pinchas’ zealotry in killing Jews who had been consorting with Midianites, which even some of Pinchas’ compatriots did not necessarily approve of. Danny went on to talk about the need for care over the way we understand the Torah Law. Just because there is a law does not necessarily mean we have to implement it, so while Pinchas was within his legal rights to kill the men who had been with the Midianite women, he did not necessarily need to exercise this right – perhaps there could have been some other form of punishment. He also then alluded to the actions of ISIS in the name of Islam, and pointed out that even if violent punishment is prescribed in the Koran, Muslims today can choose not to exercise that right.

He also spoke about the transfer of leadership from Moses to Joshua which we read in the Torah piece, and from Elijah to Elisha which we read in the Haftarah. In both cases the successor was someone offering more thought and introspection compared with the charismatic and more outgoing figure that preceded him, but this was what was required at the time.

We are all very grateful for Danny making his second visit to HJC within a month. 

Hereford Food Bank

We are still collecting for Hereford and Malvern Food Banks at all services.

Please buy just one extra item from this list and leave it at our collection point.

Items requested by Hereford Food Bank are:

  • Tins: Meat – hot or cold; vegetables; fruit; rice pudding.
  • Dry goods: Smash potato; rice; powdered custard; dried milk; instant coffee; sugar.
  • General: UHT milk; pasta sauce; jam; marmalade; instant/microwave meals.
  • Hygiene: Shampoo; toothpaste; soap; household cleaners e.g. washing up liquid, detergent.

Thank you. Any queries please contact them on 01432 353347

Welfare – Andrea is currently housebound but improving gradually and in receipt of good regular care visits. Rosalie had a fall on the road several weeks ago and is much improved.

BBooook Review – The Dogs and the Wolves by Irène Némirovsky

Book review – Irene Nemirovsky – The Dogs and The Wolves.

Irene Némirovksy’s name may be known as the author of Suite Française, which became a film shown in cinemas earlier this year. However she wrote several other works, and I read The Dogs and The Wolves whilst in France this summer. Irene Némirovksy came from a wealthy Russian Jewish family who settled in Paris in 1920, and wrote her novels in French. The Dogs & The Wolves was published in 1940, only 2 ½ years before her deportation to Auschwitz, where she died from typhus, soon after.

This is a story of Jewish society, in particular the relationships between the lowest ranks and those at the top of the pile. It tells the story of Ada, born amongst the poorest ranks in a ghetto in Ukraine, and her cousin Ben, born amongst the highest ranks. It tells of their lives as children in the city in Ukraine in the early years of the20th century, and the subsequent life in Paris, where Ada becomes an artist, and Ben a businessman. It is a powerful and passionate book, though when I began reading it, there was little hint of how dramatic the story would become. It tells a fascinating tale of life for Jews (though not particularly observant ones) in both Ukraine and as emigrés in Paris. Némirovksy’s writing is vivid and very visual, and I would recommend this as very worthwhile.. To quote from the Jewish Women’s Archive: Irene Nemirovski was a writer….. ‘who could look inside the human soul and make music with words’. JB

Etgar Keret – The Seven Good Years – Comment

Etgar Keret is a 47 year old Israeli novelist who has recently published a collection of essays entitled ‘The Seven Good Years’ coming from the biblical story of Pharaoh’s dream of seven fat-fleshed cows and seven lean and scrawny cows standing by a river. Joseph was called on for an interpretation and explains that seven years of abundance are coming to Egypt followed by seven years of famine.

Keret explains, ‘the seven good years were the years when I was able to be both son to my father and father to my son, when I could look back and see my past and look forward and see my future’. His parents were Holocaust survivors: his father survived by living for almost 600 days in a ‘hole in the ground’ outside a Polish village. His parents wanted their children to have richer lives spiritually rather than materially.

Seven Good Years’ is not published in Israel as it is intended to communicate the Israeli reality to an outside world that sees the Israel-Palestine situation in a very black and white ‘goodies and baddies’ way and resists the idea that the reality might be more complex.

Keret writes opinion pieces on the conflict for both the Israeli and international press. In Israel, as a liberal left wing Israeli writing against the government and the Gaza war people would boycott him saying he was a traitor, and overseas people would boycott him as an Israeli. This shows the dilemma Keret faces in expressing his views.

The Seven Good Years is published by Granta. For further information see Guardian Article at: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/aug/01/etgar-keret-books-interview-israel-the-seven-good-years

Cherry Wolfe

Month of Reflection CCJ – If not now, when?

This initiative aims to encourage the Jewish community to engage in prayer and spiritual reflection on the persecution of Christians in the Middle East, extending the circle of spiritual engagement from the Christian community into the Jewish community and beyond. In conjunction with our Still An Issue initiative raising awareness of antisemitism and encouraging a response within the Christian community, we are bringing the communities closer together through profound engagement with one another’s key issues.

The spiritual engagement on this issue will be centred around the month of August, providing a focal point for the response, but we expect and intend the initiative to continue beyond this with further engagement throughout the year. A nationwide response to the persecution of Christians in the Middle East, the initiative is endorsed by our Presidents from across the Christian and Jewish spectrums.

To provide a springboard for prayer and other forms of spiritual reflection, we have created a general resource with information about Christians in the Middle East and ideas for personal and communal responses. This is supplemented by resources written by individual rabbis that may be more appropriate for use in certain denominations that also provide a more personal response to this issue. All of these resources can be found here.

There are plenty of ways for individuals or communities to engage in the initiative, either separately or coming together. You could:

  • Arrange a reciprocal visit between the local Church and Synagogue

  • Hold a cross-communal vigil, potentially in conjunction with the local CCJ branch

  • Host a joint educational event with a speaker on this issue

For more ideas, please contact cjrelations@ccj.org.uk.

Council for Christians and Jews

Background to Christian Persecution in the Middle East – see next page.

If not now, when?

There are many references in the T’nach and commentaries as to how and why we should treat others (non-Jews) fairly.

  • we are all created b’tselem Elokim – in the image of God. We believe that every person is equally significant before the divine, all human beings are equal, all human beings are unique and most importantly all human beings are of infinite value (Tzelem UK mission statement).

  • Rabbi John Rayner wrote in Siddur Lev Chadash concerning peace, that we are required ‘to denounce injustice, not only when it is committed against us, but also when it is committed against others; to defend human rights, not only our own, but theirs….’

  • Our Rabbis have taught: We support the poor of the Gentiles along with the poor of Israel, and visit the sick of the Gentiles along with the sick of Israel, and bury the poor of the Gentiles along with the dead of Israel, for these are the ways of peace. Babylonian Talmud Gittin 61a

Reform & Liberal Judaism

Forthcoming Events

Limmud in the Woods

Exploring Jewish life… Radical Simplicity. 
August bank holiday weekend 27 – 31 August 2015

Limmud in the Woods is a unique event. We spend 5 days building our own community in the countryside, sleeping under canvas and experiencing top quality Jewish learning, activities in the great outdoors and events late into the night.

Cot £199– 5 days, £100 – 2 days, £60 – one day

South West Regional Shabbaton Swindon, Saturday November 28 2015 including HJC. Communities involved will include Bristol, Gloucestershire, Oxford, Reading, Wessex and Herefordshire.

HJC are actively participating in planning of this event, so we hope that as many members as possible will be able to attend the day. Previous Shabbatons have been thoroughly enjoyed by all who have attended. Further details available soon.

London Klezmer Quartet – Monmouth, Saturday 5th December. This is one of the premier Klezmer groups in the country, and we are lucky that they will be playing relatively locally. This should be a wonderful evening, so do save the date.

 

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Sunday 13 September

Re-consecration of tombstones, followed by evening Rosh Hashanah service , led by Mark Walton

4.00 p.m. &

5.30 p.m.

Hereford Cemetery

Then at Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Tuesday 22 September

Yom Kippur Kol Nidrei service- led by Julian Brown

7 p.m.

Catholic Church Ledbury t.b.c.

Friday 2nd October

Simchat Torah Service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

7 p.m.

Bridges Centre, Monmouth

Saturday 24th October

Shabbat Service, Lech Lecha, led by student Rabbi (t.b.c.)

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

Sat 21st November

Shabbat Service, led by Julian Brown. This will be a service focusing on Hebrew and learning.

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

Saturday 12th December

Chanukah service and party led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

3 p.m.

Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Other Events of Interest

Saturday 28 November

South West Regional Shabbaton

Day event

Swindon

Saturday 5 December

London Klezmer Quarter performance,

evening

Bridges Centre, Monmouth.

Subscriptions

Note that subscriptions for HJC were due by 31 July, so if you have not already sent yours in, please send to HJC Treasurer, Hanna Wine, as soon as possible.

For more information or to join our community please contact our Chair: Mark Walton  mark.walton@bridgescentre.org.uk  Tel: 01594 530721 (eve)

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 September

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 words, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures are also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

Book Review – The Dogs and the Wolves by Irène Némirovsky

High Holy Days services across the county – and in Wales

HJC is holding the following services for the High Holy Days:

Erev Rosh Hashanah

Sunday 13th September at 5.30pm in Hereford, led by our Chair, Mark Walton. Exact venue to be confirmed. We hope this will be preceeded by the rededication of the Jewish part of the Hereford cemetery.

Kol Nidre

Tuesday 22nd September at 7.00pm in Ledbury, led by Julian Brown. Exact venue to be confirmed.

Simchat Torah

Friday 2nd October at 7.00pm in Monmouth at the Bridges Centre, led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard.

 

All members and non-members welcome, please pay your membership subscription promptly to our new Treasurer, Hannah Wine.