HJC Newsletter October/November 2016

Editorial

I had planned to have this newsletter ready for Rosh Hashanah, but planning for Rosh Hashanah evening took over, so we are now in the period of reflection between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Certainly there is plenty to reflect on, within ourselves, within our own community, and with the wider world in which we live. Our readings on Rosh Hashanah also made us think there are many different perspectives on how we do this, so each of us has to find the way that suits us.

Some of us also attended the Rosh Hashanah morning service in Gloucester, which was Rabbi Anna Gerard’s first official duty following her period of leave. She spoke again about the Binding of Isaac – a challenge of all challenges, so I guess we all have to think how far we are prepared to go for our beliefs and principles.

Wishing everyone in the community G’mar Chatimah Tovah – Happy New Year.

In this edition:

Chair Chat Hereford Peace Service JMI Yiddish Summer school. Ladies who lunch. Charity Update. New year message from Charles Clore Centre. Hebrew groups.

CHAIR CHAT

Saturday September 10

We were very grateful to Rabbi Michael Standfield for leading our service on September 10.   He was very interesting, particularly about his time as a rabbi in Johannesburg and Durban, and it was also nice for him to meet up with Rosalie and Michelle, his former congregants from Middlesex New.    Many thanks also to Rabbi Danny Rich for arranging his “stand in” at very short notice.   Another new venue for us at Ledbury Community Centre – quite convenient but too big for our current needs.

 

Preparation for Rosh Hashanah

 As Rabbi Michael reminded us, the period before Rosh Hashanah is a time to seek reconciliation.   I am not sure that Joey Barton, the controversial and outspoken footballer and part time philosopher, has entirely got the message about apologies.   After withdrawing an unreserved apology to one of his team mates for an altercation, he tweeted, Apologising doesn’t always mean that you’re wrong and the other person is right. It means you value your relationship more than your ego.”

Rosh Hashanah Supper

The answer to encouraging people to come out on Erev Rosh Hashanah is obviously food.  We had a record attendance of 25 people at the Burgage Hall in Ledbury.  Julian and Cherry led an evening of readings, stories and songs to welcome the New Year and to explore its meaning.  This was a very thoughtful, innovative and inclusive approach, the highlight of which was the traditional blowing of the shofar.   The wonderful buffet laid on by Cherry with her team of willing helpers was a magnificent spread with a particularly impressive array of cakes.  As a community, we are extremely fortunate to have people like Julian and Cherry in our midst.  They worked tirelessly to make the evening such a success, ensuring that everyone was involved, well fed and included.

Peace Day Service – Herefordshire Interfaith group – 25th of September 2016

The second Interfaith Peace Day service to be held in Hereford Cathedral, was a moving event at which a large number of faiths were represented, including Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, Baha’i, Quaker, and Christian. After an introduction by the Chancellor of Hereford Cathedral, there was a candle lighting ceremony for all the faiths, and we were then honoured to be the first event in the programme. Six members of HJC – Mark, Rosalie, Eva, Alison, Cherry and Julian joined in with singing Od Yavo Shalom Aleynu, which was led by Cherry Wolfe, and accompanied by guitar. We received very positive feedback from other participants in the service, so we must have been doing something right. One of the other very powerful contributions to the service was a ‘Qirat’, a Muslim chanting of a passage from the Koran, which had a style and tone not so different from that of a traditional Chazzan. There was also some fine singing and chants by the Interfaith choir, as well as a rather unexpected song from a Christian musical which had been performed in Belfast. Mark and Julian also read Psalm 23 in Hebrew which was then sung together in English by the congregation.

After the service we were served with local apple juice, and had chance to meet with other participants and those attending the service, which was very enjoyable, as we always find we have more in common than differences on these occasions.

This is a worthwhile event which I hope can be more widely supported in future and also include those not necessarily so directly involved in faith groups.

We are very grateful to Vanessa Pomeroy who took photographs of the service, two of which are included here.

Julian Brown

Ot Azoy Yiddish Course

In August, Cherry Wolfe attended a Yiddish summer schools at SOAS in London, run by JMI (Jewish music Institute). We recorded an interview with her about the course.

Why did you decide to go on a Yiddish course?

When I was growing up my parents sometimes spoke Yiddish, or bits of Yiddish at times when they didn’t want I or my brother to understand what they said. The sense of that Yiddish around me is still with me, and I want to explore my connection with it and with my ancestors and their stories and where they come from.

When did the course run and how was organised how long did it last?

It’s a summer course which is like a crash course for one week. It happens every summer in London and there were also Yiddish courses in other cities around the world but the one in London runs at SOAS, the school of African and Oriental studies near King’s Cross.

What was your overall experience of the course?

The students were diverse and came from a variety of different backgrounds. They weren‘t all Jewish: there were some who came from a mainly academic background, or those who had other kinds of interest, for example there was a young Polish woman I met, a young woman who originally came from Latvia and lived in the States, and an academic woman whose area was Slavic languages, and felt that Yiddish had an important place in that. The teaching was excellent, and I enjoyed the classes thoroughly.

Would you say you need to have a background in Hebrew or that having a background in Hebrew helps with learning Yiddish?

It would help but is not essential, though it is harder when you start without any background in the Hebrew alphabet which is what Yiddish is written in.

Was it primarily language or did you do music or other aspects of Yiddish culture?

It‘s a very intense week and very full. We do language in the morning: written language, spoken language, and we did homework and conversation in the afternoon. We have two music sessions for those who want to join those: song repertoire session after lunch for an hour, and then later in the afternoon there‘s Yiddish choir. There were film sessions about Yiddish film although I didn‘t go to any of these, as I chose to go to Yiddish choir. There are evening talks which are also very interesting, about different aspects of Yiddish culture and its historical context, covering the last 150 years approximately.

I‘m told you went on a walk in the East End?

That wasn‘t strictly a part of the course but it was connected, and it was an antifascist tour of the East End street, along Cable Street and parts of the East End where Mosley had tried to march in 1936.

Can you say anything about the way the course was organised and put together?

I thought it was very well put together. I felt I learnt a lot in the week, and I could have done with a month really, and all the staff were very helpful. It was very busy and quite tiring, but very well organised.

Would you recommend the course to others?

Absolutely I enjoyed it thoroughly, and I know many people who go year after year, and there is also the song school which is happening at the same time, which we join in some sessions with, but they are studying song repertoire for the whole week.

What did you do about accommodation the course?

One of the possible options for accommodation is that there are some SOAS halls of residence very near to where the course is taking place, and I stayed there for the course of the week.

Thank you very much telling us about JMI‘s Yiddish Course.

Ot Azoy: Details from JMI: https://www.jmi.org.uk/event/ot-azoy-2016/

Obituary – Ralph Eskinazi

Ralph Eskinazi, who died at the beginning of September, and his wife Val, have long supported Herefordshire Jewish community and attended several of our services and events over the years. Since their move to Malvern some years back, Ralph and Val have also been welcome visitors at many of our Malvern Seders, either at our house or at the Grandi family house. Ralph has always had some interesting anecdote or contribution to make to the proceedings.

Ralph was a fascinating character. Born in Cairo, and brought up in Egypt, where he had a French Lycee education, he came to Britain at the age of 18. He began work as a draughtsman and subsequently had a career as a planning engineer.

He had an enthusiasm for many aspects of life, from being an expert backgammon player, to regular swimmer at Malvern Splash, to being a member of a Greek culture club. He was interested in many aspects of Judaism and Jewish life and culture. Ralph and Val were lifelong members and regular attenders of Birmingham Progressive synagogue after their marriage. Barry Roseman of Birmingham Progressive synagogue said of Ralph: “It was clear from the attendance at the funeral and the evening prayers, that in life Ralph touched many people as the two gatherings cut across any boundaries in our community as well as those from outside.”

In the last five years, Ralph was lucky enough to be able to spend time with his grandson.

We wish a long life to Ralph’s widow Val Eskinazi, his two sons, Simon and David and his two sisters.

Julian Brown

Angela West writes:

Ladies who lunch…in this case at the Estero Lounge in Monmouth, where we discussed the Daughters of Zelophehad, 

(Num.27,1-11) – five remarkable sisters who petitioned Moses concerning their inheritance rights, and got a change in the law from Sinai! We were considering this (and other stories of bible women) as possible topics for discussion at the Jewish Cultural Group that meets in Monmouth.

Hanna’s sister Gail was also with us and took the photo.   

Angela West

Hebrew Groups

Hebrew groups in Malvern and Monmouth are again up and running after the summer break. As well as preparing for Rosh Hashanah with prayers and songs, the Monmouth group also took on the task of translating some of the Torah text of the binding of Isaac. There’s a lot of knowledge in the group once we all share what we know.

JB

HJC High Holyday Charity Appeal

As a community HJC aims to raise at least £100 for each of our chosen charities, and this year we are hoping to raise even more, as we have an increasingly active community, and we have very worthwhile causes to support. Our chosen charities are the Charles Clore Centre, and Combat Stress.

Many of you have already given donations but if anyone else would like to contribute, please send donations to our Treasurer, Alison Turner. Cheques payable to Herefordshire Jewish Community.

We are delighted to say that, following our Rosh Hashanah evening, we have already raised £300, a record for our Community, so thank you to everyone for your generosity.

Members Welfare

We wish health and recovery to Judith Labelter who is currently housebound with mobility problems.

 Picture Quiz

No picture quiz this month, but if you would like to feature in the next edition let us know. Last edition pictures were of course of Rosalie Tobe.

New Year message from Mohamed Fahili, Charles Clore Community Centre

What brings us hope in this upcoming year? 

      25 youths gaining life-skills for their national service
32 children enhancing their focus through Karate
35 women empowered to find employment
42 ballet dancers synchronising their steps
43 children expressing themselves through art
54 young musicians connecting through notes not words
60 pre-schoolers transitioning with confidence into school
60 new learners discovering the power of English words
68 children playing and laughing at our 3 daycare facilities

Hundreds of visitors celebrating Shared Society in action.

This is The Meeting Place

Our Meeting Place. Your Meeting Place.
 A place for all – Christian, Jew and Muslim.
A place to find hope and cherish it.

      We thank you for your ongoing support which has helped us become what we are today. Our Centre is doing so much for so many beautiful Arab and Jewish children in and around Akko. And the vision doesn’t end here. There is still so much more we can do together.
Stand up and be counted.

We at The Sir Charles Clore Jewish Arab Community Centre all join in wishing you and all your friends and family a sweet New Year filled with hopes for a better world.

Mohammad Fahili – Director
Clare King Lassman

Sir Charles Clore Jewish-Arab Community Centre http://www.ajcenter.org.il

 

 

Forthcoming Events

UK International Jewish Film Festival, 5 – 20 November 2016

There is an exciting programme of films for this festival. Most showings are in a range of venues in London with occasional events in Manchester, Nottingham, Leeds and Glasgow. If you happen to be in London during this period, do try and catch something. Always well worthwhile.

Details at: http://ukjewishfilm.org/

High Holyday services

Yom Kippur services at Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish Community (GLJC). See details below.

 Kol Nidre 11th October 7.00pm at Up Hatherley Village Hall (UHVH), Cold Pool Lane, Cheltenham GL51 6JA

 Yom Kippur 12th October 11.00am – 7.30pm approx. at Friends Meeting House, Greyfriars, Gloucester, GL1 1TS. with Morning and Additional Service, Study or walk, Afternoon service,
Yizkor and Concluding Service then breaking the fast with a communal chavurah meal.

HJC Services

Our next service is the Simchat Torah service on Saturday 22nd October at Bridges Centre, led by Rabbi Anan Gerrard. This is always a most enjoyable and informative event, so please try to come along. Children especially welcome.

We are still waiting to hear of date and student Rabbi for our annual Lech Lecha service in November, but this is usually a most interesting service, so we hope you can join us. We will post information on Rabbi and location as soon as we know.

Hebrew groups

Monmouth – Tuesday 1st November 4 p.m. Bridges Centre.

Malvern – t.b.c.

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 November 2016

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 wds, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

Herefordshire Jewish Community Contacts

For all enquiries please email hjc@liberaljudaism.org  Or phone our Chair, Mark Walton 

on 01594 530721 after 6pm. 

 

 

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Saturday Oct 22nd Simchat Torah Service – led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard 11.00 a.m. Bridges Centre, Drybridge Park, Monmouth, NP25 5AS
Saturday 12th (5th/19th) November Lech Lecha Shabbat service led by student Rabbi 11.00 a.m. Colwall/Ledbury t.b.c.
Sunday 20th November Mitzvah Day t.b.c.

Other Events of Interest

Tuesday October 11th GLJC Kol Nidre Service 7 p.m. Up Hatherley Village Hall (UHVH), Cold Pool Lane, Cheltenham GL51 6JA
Wednesday, October 12th GLJC Yom Kippur Services, followed by breaking of Fast & meal. 11.00 a.m. (t.b.c.) – 7.30 p.m. Friends Meeting House, Greyfriars, Gloucester, GL1 1TS

 

High Holyday Appeal 2016 – 5777

Each year HJC supports two charities – one local and one Jewish/Israel charity. This year our two charities are:

Combat Stress which is the leading mental health charity for veterans in the UK. They currently have 6000 veterans registered with them, all affected in some way by their military experiences. They treat a range of mental health conditions including PTSD, depression and anxiety.

www.combatstress.org.uk

 

Charles Clore Centre, Acco, Israel:

Their goal is twofold: to work to administer a wide range of activities for a population for whom there are few informal educational, leisure or community services, and to help bridge the gap between Acre’s Jewish and Arab communities.

ajcenter.org.il

We aim to split our Charity Appeal equally between the two charities, but if you wish to support one specifically, let us know.

HJC High Holyday Appeal Donation

I enclose donation of £…………. towards the HJC High Holyday Appeal 2016. Please make cheques payable to Herefordshire Jewish Community.

I am happy for my donation to be split between the two charities [ ]

Or, my preferred charity is:

Donations can either be put in the donation box at the Rosh Hashanah Evening for those attending,

OR sent by post or bank transfer to Alison Turner, HJC Treasurer, please email hjc@liberaljudaism.org or phone 01594 530721 (after 6pm) for more information. 

Thank you for your support.

HJC Council

Book now for Rosh Hashanah 2016/5777

Rosh Hashanah Gathering and Meal with readings, and music for the New Year

on Sunday 2 October, at 6.30pm at

Burgage Hall 

Ledbury

Herefordshire HR8 1DW

Directions for location and parking are here: http://www.ledburycivicsociety.org/burgage-hall/directions-to-burgage-hall/

Parking in the Bye Street car park is free on Sunday evening, and is only a short walk to Burgage Hall.

Burgage Hall is less than 10 minutes walk from Ledbury railway station.

£10 per head including a vegetarian meal and soft drinks.

Please book by 23 September to join our Jewish New Year celebration,  either by email to hjc@liberaljudaism.org or phone Mark Walton on 01594 530721 after 6pm.

rosh-hashana-flyer

Herefordshire Jewish Community Newsletter August/September 2016

Editorial

The summer is often a quiet time for our community, but certainly not so this year. Several of our members have been attending events both within and outside our local area, within the wider Liberal Jewish community and beyond, and with Interfaith activities.

For this reason, this newsletter is rather longer than usual, as we have had many contributions from members, which is very encouraging. However, readers may find they do not want to read it all in one go, for fear of overload of conference reports! Perhaps we need some alternative entries for next edition – story, article on some other topic, or recipe for example. I have not edited contributions sent in (except in one case), but may need to reconsider this policy in future.

Social Action – refugees. As we are living in a constantly changing political climate both nationally and internationally, we have to do our best to follow our own values and interpret them in the best way we can with regard to social and political action. The Rene Cassin Foundation is the Jewish organisation for Human Rights, and has been doing some very effective work with refugees and also those already in this country but who are detained in detention centres. See article on Limmud day on this topic.

ED

In this edition:

Chair Chat Biennial Reports Birmingham Limmud Reports Ammerdown report Chavurah Supper Interfaith events Charities Hebrew groups Book Review

CHAIR CHAT

ANN FRANK SERVICE

Our service on Saturday June 14 at Saxon Hall was a very special occasion led by Rabbi Andrew Goldstein, President of Liberal Judaism. Representatives of Christian and Buddhist faiths also attended. It was a great honour for us to have Rabbi Goldstein leading our service as he has so many links with present day Jewish communities in Europe and he gave an inspiring sermon on the importance of trees as symbols of renewal after destruction.   He spoke of the Anne Frank tree that had to be cut down, and its daughters – now growing in many locations….and a tree in Terezin that had the same fate.

Andrew also led an interesting study session for us on the Book of Ruth before the service. As an added bonus his wife, Sharon, enriched our service with her beautiful singing. We would also like to thank Peter Cocks, the Chair of the Saxon Hall Trust, for planting and nurturing the Anne Frank tree for us, and we would certainly like to make this an annual occasion.

LIMMUDNIKS

We certainly punched above our weight as a small community and it was wonderful to meet up again with Andrea Berry-Ottaway, who is well on her way to recovery. I had never been to a Limmud before and certainly enjoyed the informal but well organised atmosphere. The venue (Queen Elizabeth Hospital) and the food (lots of it) were both excellent. I was a little bit disappointed that there were no text based sessions – the session on the Psalms that I was going to attend was cancelled at the last moment. I particularly enjoyed the virtual tour of Jewish homes and hospitals in London by the excellent Rachel Kolsky and there was a particularly interesting session on end of life decisions led by a surgeon and our friend, Rabbi Margaret Jacobi. I would certainly go again to Limmud and encourage others to do so – a stimulating and enjoyable day.

THE FLYING LOVERS OF VITEBSK

If you love Chagall as I do, you would have loved this show which previewed at Bristol and went on to the Globe in London. Based very closely on Jackie Wullschlanger’s biography (also very well worth reading), it recounted Chagall’s courtship and marriage to Bella through the tempestuous times in which they lived. The story was told with movement and songs, many in Yiddish, and developed a magical atmosphere. The two actors bore an uncanny physical resemblance to Marc and Bella and recreated many of the scenes we are familiar with in Chagall’s paintings. There was humour but also sadness, in the destruction of Jewish culture in Vitebsk, the ravages of war and the early death of Bella. All in all, a great show.

NEXT SERVICE

Once again, Rabbi Danny Rich has come to our rescue and will be leading our service at Colwall on Saturday September 10. He has also agreed to lead a study session on a subject of our choice – any requests? We hope to have Rabbi Anna back with us after the High Holydays.

Biennial Reports

Alison Turner writes:

Liberal Judaism’s Biennial on 1st – 3rd July, was in Solihull this year, a new venue and thankfully much more compact than the previous one. I attended the whole weekend, Jaci Hannan joined me for the Saturday. Our old friend Rabbi Aaron Goldstein opened our Shabbat service with Rabbi Rachel Benjamin and his guitar and we had a choral service. On Saturday morning by contrast, we had Ma Tovu together, then we had an immersive prayer experience in various rooms. Options ranged from Solomon’s Temple with grain sacrifices, The Rabbinic period of freeform prayers around standard opening and closings, The Spanish Inquisition (chorus no-one expects the Spanish Inquisition), The Western Wall of the 2nd Temple, Chasidic dancing, Liberal Judaism around 1995 and the BuJew, influenced bythe teachings and practices of Buddhism. This was very interesting to be part of, though it did not last long. It reminded us that Judaism has always changed and adapted, and led us to our theme Thinking outside the book.

In the afternoon I attended a session on a strategy for music development. The vision is for our engagement with music to be at the forefront of Judaism and spirituality in the UK. Project aims are:

  1. Reinforcing and challenging our community’s musical traditions.

  2. Empowering music leaders and composers to be more successful and influential in musical practice.

  3. Creating closer ties of community access so we all have the same tunes.

  4. Maintaining a very high level of accessibility to new music and methods of delivery, using the internet and smartphones.

  5. Uphold intergenerational ties of music as a powerful means of engaging with youth.

They advise thinking of the atmosphere we wish to create in our service, then pick the music to enhance the text, engage and elevate our prayers. Cantors do this in the USA but it barely exists here in the UK. More music will go into the Resource Bank at ljresourcebank.org as copyright issues are cleared, and a songbook is planned. Funding will be needed for some of this.

I also went to a session on becoming a Baal Tefillah, a prayer leader for our community, which I hope to start in Jan. 2017. The course is personalised for each community so I will try to learn the things we need, for example there are differing levels of Hebrew used.

Jacquie Hannan writes:

LJ Biennial – July 1st – 3rd July 2016 – St John’s Hotel, Solihull, Birmingham.

Rabbi Charley Baginskey who chaired the Biennial committee was quoted as saying “the Biennial’s success is indicative of the passion that Liberal Judaism deserves.” This is a very apt view of the event in its entirety.

As an attendee for one day, my perspective was greatly limited by time. On my arrival, singers with guitars enlivened corridors as people poured into the hall for the Shabbat Shacharit service. Speakers, including Rabbis from Northwood and Elstree, ensured interest, conviviality, and a sincere time of worship. The service was followed by new graduations from the Ba’alei Tefillah Course. I attended two discussion sessions:

Is God still an Englishman?” – Cole Moreton and Rabbi David Goldberg

The author Cole Moreton is a broadcaster, journalist and feature writer for the Independent and Telegraph newspapers, and a professional speaker with an eclectic understanding of the UK’s contemporary social structures and politics. On receiving his 2016 Press Award, Cole’s reply was “It pays to compliment your audience”. This approach was evidently paying off at the Biennial, as the audience seemed more than duly appreciative, when he conveyed the gist of his book was that more than 75% of English people are developing a new spiritually separate from the mainstream ones to which they no longer feel any affiliation. I question whether true empathy arises without understanding of how a person can hold on to a deep enough faith to be sustainable through trials. Of course Cole is too gracious and socially aware to ever offend, and as in his many faceted book, he stands at edge of a sea of profundities and inference, barely wetting his toe, looking around for people not to offend. However, the issues were too vast to have been explored to any depth in that context.

The wise and erudite Rabbi David Goldberg was paired as his counterpart, perhaps an unenviable position due to their diverse stances.

How do we respond to Brexit and the apparent Division within Society and as a movement?

Ben Rich, Danny Rich, Tanya Sakhnovich, Nottingham Synagogue, and Ilan Baron, Durham University.

I attended this session, eagerly anticipating the imaginative exploration of roads forward following the democratic referendum. Sadly, the time only allowed for airing of frustrations held by most people present, who viewed their opponents who voted for Brexit as being both racists and stupid and uninformed about fiscal matters. Democracy can be surprisingly emotive. I reminded some people that anti-Semitism and related violence has been greatly increasing in Europe in recent years, completely unrelated to Brexit, and has resulted in the increase of numbers fleeing to Israel.

It was an interesting day, with opportunity to socialise with many lovely people from a wide variety of locations. Had I been able to stay longer, I would have chosen to attend many stimulating and very enjoyable sessions from the wide range on offer.

Angela West writes:

Wisdom Literature at the Ammerdown Conference Centre, Somerset, with Rabbi Howard Cooper, July 1st-3rd

The Ammerdown Centre has been the beautiful setting for several interfaith events that I have attended here in the past. The focus this time was on the text of Qohelet/Ecclesiastes, and the Jews in the group tended to be rather thin on the ground. But at least Howard made every one aware that it was a Hebrew text in translation we were considering (which those who think of the Hebrew scriptures as the ‘Old Testament’ occasionally tend to forget). It was good to be reminded that all translations are in fact interpretations.

Actually, in the course of the weekend, we only managed a couple of chapters of the text, as Howard takes an intensive rather extensive approach to bible study. Some would no doubt have preferred to get more of an overview, but I was fortunate in having some sense of the whole text as we had studied it at Bible Week the year before. Qohelet contains some stunningly beautiful poetry (I’m specially haunted by 12:3-8) but it is rather unusual among biblical texts in its uncompromising rejection of meaningfulness in human life: ‘Utter futility – said Qoheleth – all is futile!’ (12:8). Unlike most other texts in the Hebrew Bible, here God does not seem to be in charge of history – not that of Israel or of anyone else’s. Not a very reassuring theme – though some people in the group were clearly determined to derive some moral uplift from the text despite its apparent absence. May be the reasoning was: it’s in the bible so it must be edifying.

A question that often arises for me is: how does the religious/historical context of the reader affect how she reads the text? Just before one of the sessions, a lady sitting next to me remarked during a conversation: “My mother never really forgave Hitler. My father had just invested in a new bowler hat – and it got lost during an air raid!” I’m not sure to what extent she endorsed her mum’s perspective on this matter, as the session started before we had time to continue… But those who, like me, are exercised by this question, might be interested to know of Emil Fackenheim’s response to it in his book: The Jewish Bible After the Holocaust: A Re-reading.

Angela West

Limmud Day Reports

West Midlands Limmud day, Birmingham, Sunday 10 July 2016

On Sunday 10 July, five members of HJC, Mark, Angela, Shirley, Julian & Cherry attended the first Limmud study day to be held in Birmingham, hosted by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Medical Centre. We had a warm welcome from Richard Wharton, chaplain of QEH, who had been very instrumental in helping set up the Limmud day, and from Rabbi Yossi Jacobs of Singers Hill synagogue, who as always, had a pithy story to tell us. We then went off to a wide range of talks, film, and workshops, and between us covered a wide range of topics which included:

  • A holocaust survivor’s journey from Auschwitz to Birmingham
  • What are Jewish communities doing to help refugees in Calais and Dunkirk, and how can we improve the rights of those held in detention centres within the UK (where conditions are in some cases worse than prisons, as there is no knowing how long you may, as a refugee, have to remain there)?
  • The fascinating history of London’s Jewish homes and hospitals from the 18th century until today.
  • Jewish migration – how did we all come to be here, where did we come from, and most importantly why did we come?
  • Jewish music, art, and not least spirituality were part of other sessions engaged in.

All who went felt they gained something positive from the day, and all felt it was worth the effort, especially for the Monmouth contingent who had a long journey to get there. Perhaps next time there may be someone in our community who could present a session, as well as simply drinking in the wisdom of others?

Julian Brown

Shirley Goldstein writes:

One of my choices was listening to Mindu Hornick – From Auschwitz to Birmingham

An inspirational speaker who spoke straight from the heart, taking us through her life journey –  how she survived the horrors of the holocaust as a young girl losing her parents, two brothers and, after the war ended, found herself living in Birmingham and managed to adjust to life living with an Uncle and Aunt.  She went on to marry and had two children.   For many years she was too traumatised to speak about her earlier life and after around 20 years she started to communicate to her close family in the UK what had happened in the past.  She later decided to dedicate herself to sharing her story to schools and adults as an education for future generations.  She was moving, humbling and sincere and it was very touching listening to her.  She had an elegance, dignity and beauty that just shone through.

Great Jewish Lyricists – Mike Levy  

Most interesting workshop exploring words and music and how the two blended together, sharing the genius of the individual Jewish writers and musicians in days gone by.  It was very well presented and gave a fascinating insight into the clever use of words, sheer poetry and unbridled creativity.  We looked at the work of Ira and George Gershwin, Rogers and Hammerstein, Sammy Cahn and others – Many of the songs that we grew up with, loved and enjoyed from the great musicals of the past. 

Saving Forgotten Jews – Richard Rothschild Pearson

A most fascinating documentary showing how 18,000 Jewish people were rescued from Ethiopia and flown to Israel, after Israel received a request asking for help and to be rescued.  These were said to be part of the lost Tribe of 12 Tribes of Israel.  Three men, a Manchester Textile Merchant, a Mossad Spy and a seasoned Diplomat were instrumental in aiding this miraculous escape.  The film shown was very thought provoking on so many levels, especially when we look at what is going on in the world today with so many people being displaced and fleeing war and persecution.  It certainly gave food for thought when we reflect on the huge adjustments ahead once the people had managed to reached safety.  It was a fantastic achievement showing such courage and determination by all the people involved in this huge rescue operation. The film was beautifully made – a labour of love.

In terms of the Limmud day in Birmingham, it didn’t disappoint.  Each of the workshops I attended was an education, and was extremely well presented and was offered to the participants taking part as a pure gift.  Thank you for a wonderful day, I am so glad I came along.  

Shirley Goldstein

 Rene Cassin, Social Action and UK Detention Centres.

What do these three things have in common? A talk given by Sam Grant and Margaret Jacobi, gave us some insight into the current work of the Rene Cassin Foundation which is a Jewish Human Rights organisation. Rene Cassin was a French lawyer who was the driving force for the drawing up of the Universal declaration of Human Rights in 1948.

This organisation has been working in cooperation with many others in order to improve the conditions of asylum seekers kept in detention Centres in the UK. These centres are often far away from population centres, and the detainees are kept without any fixed time limit. Britain is one of only two countries in Europe that do not have a fixed period of detention for asylum seekers. The speakers were able to report some recent changes to the law, as a result of intense lobbying by the coalition of organisations working on this issue. For example, pregnant women and children now have strict limits on how long they can be detained. The situation is still far from ideal, and many people are unaware of what happens to many refugees when they finally reach the UK, thinking that they can now be free, but finding instead that they are kept in prison like conditions for an unknown period of time, which inmates can find very upsetting. That this state of affairs is allowed to continue in a Western democracy is regarded by many as a scandal. We will have to see what the new Home Secretary is prepared to do on this front.

For more information, see: http://www.renecassin.org/

Julian Brown

Chavurah – 15 July 2016

What is a Chavurah?

We had cheesecake and desserts, more than we could eat.

We had 2 guitars and beautiful voices for Friday evening songs and participation.

We had company, 17 of us, all somehow fitting into Cherry & Julian’s kitchen.

We had an experience like no other in HJC – a community gathering, yet also a Friday evening/Erev Shabat at home.

We had reflections on prayer, and learning that the world’s problems can be solved by activity, rather than passivity.

We had a wonderful of choice of tasty dishes and salads for our meal.

We had baby Isaac to delight us with smiles and play, and to test us with cries and squeals.

We learned that together we can become a strong community, acknowledging and respecting each other’s differences.

JB

 

Hebrew Groups

Hebrew groups have been running successfully now in both Monmouth and Malvern, although some learners were not able to attend the last sessions. The July session in Malvern was in part a musical one as we had the benefit of Cherry playing guitar, and we worked together on the Shema – singing, reading, and looking at the meaning. We continue to have interesting discussions and this is one of the highlights of our groups.

Most learners now have their own books, and we even have surplus copies of some books if anyone would like to purchase one. We are finding that the Learn Hebrew Today book (green book) is good for basic reading practice, but looking at meaning and roots of words is also important, and we found the Aleph Isn’t Enough book very informative in the last session. Books can be bought from Janet Elf at the Jewish Book service, or also via the web. If new learners wish to join groups in September, they would be very welcome, but contact Cherry or myself beforehand, so we can assess what level you are at.

Proposed next meeting dates are: Tuesday 20th September, 7.30 p.m. Malvern. Tuesday 27th September 4 p.m. Monmouth.

Julian Brown

Hebrew Reading Group

Jaci Hannan, Isaac and I have been privileged to attend a Hebrew Reading Group at the home of Archdeacon Paddy Benson in Hereford. They are working their way through Exodus, we joined them near the end of chapter 12, and worked our way through chapter 13. Each person reads a verse in Hebrew, then translates it into English, either from their own knowledge or from their Bible.

Isaac did not scream once, nor did he take any notice of the offered toys, preferring to run around and poke his nose in wherever he could: his favourite toy was an empty waste paper basket. We were made very welcome, as I’m sure would any other new members.

Alison Turner

Book Review:Some never see a map: a Talmud for creative community leadership

This is a very interesting piece of Talmud launched at the Biennial. It is “Some never see a map: a Talmud for creative community leadership” by Rabbi Shulamit Ambalu and Claire Helman. This is a new column of Talmud from Kehillah North London, talking about travelling forward, styles of leadership, cycles of the year, values, aloneness, tallit, spiritual space and resolving conflict. It is beautifully illustrated and has diverse voices weaving in and out of each other, our traditions and new ways of looking at things. I would like to recommend everyone to get a copy from rabbi@kehillah.org.uk and hope to lead a study session based on it. It is only 14 pages of A4 size and it gives me the confidence to say this, being aware that people I know can write Talmud and it lifts my spirits to new heights.

Alison Turner

Interfaith Activities

Somme Vigil – 1st July 2016

At 7 a.m., on 1st July, as representatives of HJC, Cherry and I attended the Somme Vigil at Malvern’s War Memorial, organised by Malvern Town Council. The event included readings of contemporary letters, news reports and poetry, as well as prayers for the many who had lost their lives. I was unaware that the Somme battle lasted for some 4 months, and that there were such huge losses on the first day 1st July 1916. Some of the individual accounts of local people who had lost their lives in the Somme were very moving, and the address by the Head of Malvern College, from where so many of the officer class came, was fluent and inspiring (as perhaps you might expect). Not how I would usually spend that hour of the day, but worth attending.

Peace Concert and other activities:

Several members have been involved in other interfaith activities or meetings, so we are quite active. HJC are part of the planning for the Peace Day Concert on 25th September, where we are contributing a Hebrew song to the proceedings. Please keep this date clear if you can, as it was a very worthwhile occasion last year.

 

Forthcoming Events

 

High Holyday services

In addition to our own Erev Rosh Hashanah evening, we are invited to join in with Rosh Hashanah morning service and Yom Kippur services at Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish Community (GLJC). See details below.

Rosh Hashanah Morning Oct 3rd 11.00 am at Friends Meeting House, Greyfriars, Gloucester, GL1 1TS. We will adjourn to a nearby restaurant for a communal Rosh Hashanah Lunch after the service. Please let Jill Rosenheim know in advance if you would like to join us for lunch so she can give appropriate numbers to the restaurant.

Contact:jillrosenheim@btinternet.com or 07771604735.

 Kol Nidre 11th October 7.00pm at Up Hatherley Village Hall (UHVH), Cold Pool Lane, Cheltenham GL51 6JA

 Yom Kippur 12th October 11.00am – 7.30pm approx. at Friends Meeting House, Greyfriars, Gloucester, GL1 1TS. with Morning and Additional Service, Study or walk, Afternoon service, Yizkor and Concluding Service then breaking the fast with a communal chavurah meal.

HJC High Holyday Charity Appeal

As a community HJC aims to raise at least £100 for each of our chosen charities, and this year we are hoping to raise even more, as we have an increasingly active community, and we have very worthwhile causes to support. Our chosen charities are the Charles Clore Centre, and Combat Stress.

Donations can be made at our Rosh Hashanah gathering, but you can also send donations to our Treasurer, Alison Turner. Cheques payable to Herefordshire Jewish Community.

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 September 2016

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 words, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Saturday 10th Sept Study Session led by Rabbi Danny Rich 10 a.m. Colwall Ale House
Saturday 10th Sept Shabbat Service led by Rabbi Danny Rich 11 a.m. Colwall Ale House
Sunday 2nd October Erev Rosh Hashanah Celebration meal and Readings – led by Julian & Cherry 6.30 p.m. Burgage Hall, Church Lane, Ledbury HR8 1DW
Friday Oct 21st/ OR Sat Oct 22nd t.b.c. Simchat Torah Service – led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard t.b.c. t.b.c. Bridges Centre, Drybridge Park, Monmouth, NP25 5AS

Other Events of Interest

Sunday 25th September Hereford Interfaith Group Peace Concert 5.30 p.m. Hereford Cathedral
Monday, Oct 3rd Rosh Hashanah Service – GLJC 11.00 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Greyfriars, Gloucester, GL1 1TS
Tuesday October 11th GLJC Kol Nidre Service 7 p.m. Up Hatherley Village Hall (UHVH), Cold Pool Lane, Cheltenham GL51 6JA
Wednesday, October 12th GLJC Yom Kippur Services, followed by breaking of Fast & meal. 11.00 a.m. (t.b.c.) – 7.30 p.m. Friends Meeting House, Greyfriars, Gloucester, GL1 1TS
Further Services and events
Sunday November 20th Mitzvah Day at Saxon Hall

Working in the garden

t.b.c. Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford

 

 

High Holy Days – September update

We hope to see you at Herefordshire Jewish Community services for the High Holydays, see details below. Note change of venue for Kol Nidrei service. Non-members will be welcome to attend all services.

Yahrzeit – Kol Nidrei

We will be including a short Yizkor (rememberance) service at our Kol Nidrei service. We usually read out names of those to be remembered. If anyone wishes to add names to be read out this year, please let us know in good time.

High Holyday Appeal

As usual we encourage members to donate to our chosen charities for our High Holyday appeal. Appeal form will be sent out to you separately.

Wishing you all Shana Tovah for a peaceful and healthy year.

HJC Council

 

Services will be held as follows:

Sunday 13 September Re-consecration of tombstones, followed by evening Rosh Hashanah service , led by Mark Walton 4.00 p.m. & 5.30 p.m. Hereford Cemetery Westfaling St, Hereford HR4 0JE Then at Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Tuesday 22 September Yom Kippur Kol Nidrei service- led by Julian Brown 7 p.m. Saxon Hall, as above Note change of venue

Friday 2nd October Simchat Torah Service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard 7 p.m. Bridges Centre, Wonastow Road, Monmouth NP25 5AS

Herefordshire Jewish Community Newsletter August/September 2015

Editorial

We will soon be approaching the High Holydays, but before that we have the month of Elul which is traditionally a time of reflection and introspection, in preparation for the New Year and Yom Kippur. As well as reflecting on our own deeds over the past year, this year, we also have a duty to think about others. For the first time, for this month of August, Liberal and Reform Judaism have linked up with the Council for Christians and Jews (CCJ) in a joint initiative entitled ‘If not now, when?’ This encourages us to take action on the persecution of Christian communities in the Middle East, which is sadly currently taking place in dramatic fashion, and which reminds us of the persecution we have similarly have encountered in previous times. I recently read an interview with one Christian refugee fleeing from persecution (and there will surely be others) who was amongst those in the so called migrant camp at Calais, so we need to remember that each person in the camp has a story, and remember also that many of our community are descended from refugees to this country.

Looking ahead to the HJC calendar for the next few months, we have a wide variety of activities to take part in – social, cultural and educational, as well as services. This year we are taking part in the South West small communities Shabbaton in November, which will include a day of workshops, talks, and activities which should have something to suit all members, and we hope to have a contingent attending from HJC. We can also look forward to a performance in Monmouth by London Klezmer Quartet in December, which, while not sponsored by HJC, will surely be an event we might like to attend. Finally, at this time of review, we are always looking for different ideas for activities within our own community, so if you have a particular interest which you think may suit other HJC members, let us know.

Julian Brown

In this edition:

Chair Chat Anne Frank Day Danny Rich Service

Month of Reflection Book Review Hereford Food Bank

Etgar Keret –Israeli Essayist Forthcoming Events

CHAIR CHAT

NEW LJ SIDDUR

There is a regular LJ Chair email forum which I rarely contribute to. However, I did join in this one as there seemed to be a growing feeling that we didn’t really need another siddur, it would be expensive and time consuming to produce and costly for small communities to replace their existing siddurim. Some communities said they actually preferred the Reform siddur and I suggested that if there was to be a new one then it should be a joint progressive undertaking between LJ and the Reform movement so that it could be used by congregations in both organisations, combining the best elements from both traditions. I also personally prefer the Reform siddur with translations and explanations of the rationale and origin of certain prayers on the same page. It was suggested that my proposal would never be accepted as a combined prayer book would be seen as the “thin end of the wedge” in encouraging a merger between the two organisations. What would be the problem with that? Which leads into …..

REFORM MOVEMENT AND PATRILINEALITY

Very encouraging that the Reform rabbis are seriously considering this which is now the only outstanding doctrinal difference between the two movements. See, http://news.reformjudaism.org.uk/press-releases/reform-rabbis-balance-tradition-and-welcome.html

There is also an interesting clip on the subject of patrilineality on the BBC website of a discussion between Reform Rabbi Jonathan Romain and Dr Yaakov Wise representing orthodoxy – no meeting of minds between the two!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b062hn6n

Is there any logical reason now for the two movements not to combine to form one strong and influential Progressive voice?

Mark Walton

Anne Frank Day

Members of Herefordshire Jewish Community were privileged to take part in a joint interfaith celebration/commemoration on the theme of ‘courage’ to mark Anne Frank day on Friday 12th June, in order to remember children who have been killed through war and conflict, as well as to commemorate the courage of all those who have given their service to protect our own rights and freedoms in recent times.

Both Christian and Jewish services contributed to the atmosphere of the occasion, as more than 70 people gathered outside the Community centre to see the garden of remembrance, the tree planted in honour of Anne Frank, and the unveiling of a plaque in honour of Anne Frank and other children. It felt a very unified occasion with both Reverend Philip Brown and Rabbis Danny Rich and Anna Gerrard leading thoughtful and moving prayers to mark the occasion. It was wonderful to see so many representatives of Hereford City, Church, ex-service personnel and community organisations, praying together with members of the Jewish community. Singing by teenagers from a local school as well as bugle playing added to the sense of the occasion.

The services were followed by a magnificent tea in Saxon Hall. This gave everyone an opportunity to socialise as well as to see the photographic exhibition on the life of Anne Frank, and watch a video presentation of the development of the remembrance garden. Presentations were made to members of Hereford College who had worked on the creation of the garden.

The final part of the day was a Friday evening Erev Shabbat service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard of Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish Community and Rabbi Danny Rich, Chief executive of Liberal Judaism. A smaller number of Christian visitors joined in with this service together with members of Hereford Jewish Community. In addition, everyone seemed to be both surprised and impressed by the impromptu question and answer session offered by Rabbi Danny Rich. This covered a wide variety of aspects of Jewish faith, including the different strands of Judaism, the origins of Liberal and progressive Judaism, women Rabbis, our relationship with the Five Books of Moses, and attitudes to Israel.

In all, this was a very worthwhile occasion and shows what can be achieved through cooperation of many disparate groups and interests who have a shared vision and purpose. Hereford Jewish Community are very grateful to Centre Manager, Victoria Craig and Chair of Trustees, Peter Cocks for their commitment and enormous hard work in organising this event.

Julian Brown

Shabbat Service 11 July with Rabbi Danny Rich

Due to illness in Marc Turner’s family, the naming ceremony for baby Isaac had to be postponed. However despite this, Rabbi Danny Rich was still kind enough to lead a service for us in Hereford Scout Hut which around 14 of us attended. The venue was a welcome change in a pleasant setting.

The parasha for the week was Pinchas. As usual Danny had much to say on a range of topics. He began by talking about Pinchas’ zealotry in killing Jews who had been consorting with Midianites, which even some of Pinchas’ compatriots did not necessarily approve of. Danny went on to talk about the need for care over the way we understand the Torah Law. Just because there is a law does not necessarily mean we have to implement it, so while Pinchas was within his legal rights to kill the men who had been with the Midianite women, he did not necessarily need to exercise this right – perhaps there could have been some other form of punishment. He also then alluded to the actions of ISIS in the name of Islam, and pointed out that even if violent punishment is prescribed in the Koran, Muslims today can choose not to exercise that right.

He also spoke about the transfer of leadership from Moses to Joshua which we read in the Torah piece, and from Elijah to Elisha which we read in the Haftarah. In both cases the successor was someone offering more thought and introspection compared with the charismatic and more outgoing figure that preceded him, but this was what was required at the time.

We are all very grateful for Danny making his second visit to HJC within a month. 

Hereford Food Bank

We are still collecting for Hereford and Malvern Food Banks at all services.

Please buy just one extra item from this list and leave it at our collection point.

Items requested by Hereford Food Bank are:

  • Tins: Meat – hot or cold; vegetables; fruit; rice pudding.
  • Dry goods: Smash potato; rice; powdered custard; dried milk; instant coffee; sugar.
  • General: UHT milk; pasta sauce; jam; marmalade; instant/microwave meals.
  • Hygiene: Shampoo; toothpaste; soap; household cleaners e.g. washing up liquid, detergent.

Thank you. Any queries please contact them on 01432 353347

Welfare – Andrea is currently housebound but improving gradually and in receipt of good regular care visits. Rosalie had a fall on the road several weeks ago and is much improved.

BBooook Review – The Dogs and the Wolves by Irène Némirovsky

Book review – Irene Nemirovsky – The Dogs and The Wolves.

Irene Némirovksy’s name may be known as the author of Suite Française, which became a film shown in cinemas earlier this year. However she wrote several other works, and I read The Dogs and The Wolves whilst in France this summer. Irene Némirovksy came from a wealthy Russian Jewish family who settled in Paris in 1920, and wrote her novels in French. The Dogs & The Wolves was published in 1940, only 2 ½ years before her deportation to Auschwitz, where she died from typhus, soon after.

This is a story of Jewish society, in particular the relationships between the lowest ranks and those at the top of the pile. It tells the story of Ada, born amongst the poorest ranks in a ghetto in Ukraine, and her cousin Ben, born amongst the highest ranks. It tells of their lives as children in the city in Ukraine in the early years of the20th century, and the subsequent life in Paris, where Ada becomes an artist, and Ben a businessman. It is a powerful and passionate book, though when I began reading it, there was little hint of how dramatic the story would become. It tells a fascinating tale of life for Jews (though not particularly observant ones) in both Ukraine and as emigrés in Paris. Némirovksy’s writing is vivid and very visual, and I would recommend this as very worthwhile.. To quote from the Jewish Women’s Archive: Irene Nemirovski was a writer….. ‘who could look inside the human soul and make music with words’. JB

Etgar Keret – The Seven Good Years – Comment

Etgar Keret is a 47 year old Israeli novelist who has recently published a collection of essays entitled ‘The Seven Good Years’ coming from the biblical story of Pharaoh’s dream of seven fat-fleshed cows and seven lean and scrawny cows standing by a river. Joseph was called on for an interpretation and explains that seven years of abundance are coming to Egypt followed by seven years of famine.

Keret explains, ‘the seven good years were the years when I was able to be both son to my father and father to my son, when I could look back and see my past and look forward and see my future’. His parents were Holocaust survivors: his father survived by living for almost 600 days in a ‘hole in the ground’ outside a Polish village. His parents wanted their children to have richer lives spiritually rather than materially.

Seven Good Years’ is not published in Israel as it is intended to communicate the Israeli reality to an outside world that sees the Israel-Palestine situation in a very black and white ‘goodies and baddies’ way and resists the idea that the reality might be more complex.

Keret writes opinion pieces on the conflict for both the Israeli and international press. In Israel, as a liberal left wing Israeli writing against the government and the Gaza war people would boycott him saying he was a traitor, and overseas people would boycott him as an Israeli. This shows the dilemma Keret faces in expressing his views.

The Seven Good Years is published by Granta. For further information see Guardian Article at: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/aug/01/etgar-keret-books-interview-israel-the-seven-good-years

Cherry Wolfe

Month of Reflection CCJ – If not now, when?

This initiative aims to encourage the Jewish community to engage in prayer and spiritual reflection on the persecution of Christians in the Middle East, extending the circle of spiritual engagement from the Christian community into the Jewish community and beyond. In conjunction with our Still An Issue initiative raising awareness of antisemitism and encouraging a response within the Christian community, we are bringing the communities closer together through profound engagement with one another’s key issues.

The spiritual engagement on this issue will be centred around the month of August, providing a focal point for the response, but we expect and intend the initiative to continue beyond this with further engagement throughout the year. A nationwide response to the persecution of Christians in the Middle East, the initiative is endorsed by our Presidents from across the Christian and Jewish spectrums.

To provide a springboard for prayer and other forms of spiritual reflection, we have created a general resource with information about Christians in the Middle East and ideas for personal and communal responses. This is supplemented by resources written by individual rabbis that may be more appropriate for use in certain denominations that also provide a more personal response to this issue. All of these resources can be found here.

There are plenty of ways for individuals or communities to engage in the initiative, either separately or coming together. You could:

  • Arrange a reciprocal visit between the local Church and Synagogue

  • Hold a cross-communal vigil, potentially in conjunction with the local CCJ branch

  • Host a joint educational event with a speaker on this issue

For more ideas, please contact cjrelations@ccj.org.uk.

Council for Christians and Jews

Background to Christian Persecution in the Middle East – see next page.

If not now, when?

There are many references in the T’nach and commentaries as to how and why we should treat others (non-Jews) fairly.

  • we are all created b’tselem Elokim – in the image of God. We believe that every person is equally significant before the divine, all human beings are equal, all human beings are unique and most importantly all human beings are of infinite value (Tzelem UK mission statement).

  • Rabbi John Rayner wrote in Siddur Lev Chadash concerning peace, that we are required ‘to denounce injustice, not only when it is committed against us, but also when it is committed against others; to defend human rights, not only our own, but theirs….’

  • Our Rabbis have taught: We support the poor of the Gentiles along with the poor of Israel, and visit the sick of the Gentiles along with the sick of Israel, and bury the poor of the Gentiles along with the dead of Israel, for these are the ways of peace. Babylonian Talmud Gittin 61a

Reform & Liberal Judaism

Forthcoming Events

Limmud in the Woods

Exploring Jewish life… Radical Simplicity. 
August bank holiday weekend 27 – 31 August 2015

Limmud in the Woods is a unique event. We spend 5 days building our own community in the countryside, sleeping under canvas and experiencing top quality Jewish learning, activities in the great outdoors and events late into the night.

Cot £199– 5 days, £100 – 2 days, £60 – one day

South West Regional Shabbaton Swindon, Saturday November 28 2015 including HJC. Communities involved will include Bristol, Gloucestershire, Oxford, Reading, Wessex and Herefordshire.

HJC are actively participating in planning of this event, so we hope that as many members as possible will be able to attend the day. Previous Shabbatons have been thoroughly enjoyed by all who have attended. Further details available soon.

London Klezmer Quartet – Monmouth, Saturday 5th December. This is one of the premier Klezmer groups in the country, and we are lucky that they will be playing relatively locally. This should be a wonderful evening, so do save the date.

 

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Sunday 13 September

Re-consecration of tombstones, followed by evening Rosh Hashanah service , led by Mark Walton

4.00 p.m. &

5.30 p.m.

Hereford Cemetery

Then at Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Tuesday 22 September

Yom Kippur Kol Nidrei service- led by Julian Brown

7 p.m.

Catholic Church Ledbury t.b.c.

Friday 2nd October

Simchat Torah Service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

7 p.m.

Bridges Centre, Monmouth

Saturday 24th October

Shabbat Service, Lech Lecha, led by student Rabbi (t.b.c.)

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

Sat 21st November

Shabbat Service, led by Julian Brown. This will be a service focusing on Hebrew and learning.

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

Saturday 12th December

Chanukah service and party led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

3 p.m.

Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Other Events of Interest

Saturday 28 November

South West Regional Shabbaton

Day event

Swindon

Saturday 5 December

London Klezmer Quarter performance,

evening

Bridges Centre, Monmouth.

Subscriptions

Note that subscriptions for HJC were due by 31 July, so if you have not already sent yours in, please send to HJC Treasurer, Hanna Wine, as soon as possible.

For more information or to join our community please contact our Chair: Mark Walton  mark.walton@bridgescentre.org.uk  Tel: 01594 530721 (eve)

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 September

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 words, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures are also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

Book Review – The Dogs and the Wolves by Irène Némirovsky

High Holy Days services across the county – and in Wales

HJC is holding the following services for the High Holy Days:

Erev Rosh Hashanah

Sunday 13th September at 5.30pm in Hereford, led by our Chair, Mark Walton. Exact venue to be confirmed. We hope this will be preceeded by the rededication of the Jewish part of the Hereford cemetery.

Kol Nidre

Tuesday 22nd September at 7.00pm in Ledbury, led by Julian Brown. Exact venue to be confirmed.

Simchat Torah

Friday 2nd October at 7.00pm in Monmouth at the Bridges Centre, led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard.

 

All members and non-members welcome, please pay your membership subscription promptly to our new Treasurer, Hannah Wine.