HJC Newsletter Aug/Sept 2017

Editorial

Language has always been crucial to Jews as throughout history, Jews lived in and learned languages of such a variety of places and cultures. From Spanish, we have Ladino (see article in previous edition). From German, we have Yiddish, and Jews spoke Russian, Polish and a whole host of other Western and Eastern European languages. Hebrew was always a language for prayer and Festivals but not for everyday use (much like Latin was used in the Roman Church). So we are linguists of a kind, not through academic study, but more from force of circumstances. This edition (and next) include some comments and articles on Yiddish and Hebrew.

Next week, I will be going with Cherry on the Jewish Music Institute (JMI) Yiddish Song summer school, so should have much more knowledge about Yiddish by the time of the next edition of this newsletter.

This is the summer break, as far as HJC activities are concerned, but in September, we will then have our Rosh Hashanah service and meal together, which this year will be in the home of one of our members, Eva Mendelsson. If you want to join us, make sure you send in your booking form in good time. Finally, a reminder that HJC subscriptions are now due, and still perhaps the best value of any LJ community, so please send your forms in as soon as you can.

Julian Brown

In this edition: Chair Chat, A Hebrew Learning journey, Background to Yiddish, LJ Day of Celebration, Baby Fest report , Film Review.

CHAIR CHAT JULY 2017

1. Ann Frank Service at Saxon Hall.

Each year, on or around the 12th June, Anne Frank Day is celebrated all around the world on what would have been her birthday. Herefordshire Jewish Community marked the day on Saturday June 10 with a special service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard. We were delighted to welcome the Mayor of Hereford, Councillor Sharon Michael, and her consort, Mr Paul Needs. The inter faith element was enhanced by the presence of Canon Anna Nugent from Hereford Cathedral and the Venerable Sister (Ani) Choesang , representing the Buddhist faith. The service was particularly memorable as one of our community, Eva Mendelsson, gave a very moving account of her time as a survivor of the holocaust. Brought up in Germany, many members of her family were exterminated by the Nazis and she was herself transported to camps in France before escaping to Switzerland and Italy before eventually arriving safely in England. Eva frequently returns to Germany to talk about her experiences to young people there and all present were privileged to hear her story and inspired by the many people who risked their lives to bring her to safety. After the service, we gathered around the Ann Frank tree, planted three years ago by the Saxon Hall committee, to hear readings from Ann Frank’s diary and to offer prayers for all victims of genocide.

AnnaMarkSaxon

Photograph (from left to right), Eva Mendelsson, Councillor Sharon Michael, Rabbi Anna Gerrard, Mark Walton, Canon Anna Nugent.

We have already decided next year to share this service with Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish Community, as part of our programme to work more closely together.

2. Bread and Cheese Ceremony, St Briavels, Forest of Dean.

We have some strange customs in the village where I live. Every Whitsun the “King of the Hudnalls” (an ancestral title) stands on the wall of the old pound in the centre of the village and distributes a “bread and cheese” dole to the villages (and tourists) waiting below who try to catch the fragments in umbrellas, buckets or other receptacles as they are meant to bring good luck.

There is also a tradition to invite a visiting clergy on the same day to give a sermon for which they are rewarded the princely sum of £1 6s 8d if he or she is cheered by the crowd, as laid down in the 1625 will of William Whittington.

This year’s guest preacher was Rt. Rev Rachel Treweek, the Bishop of Gloucester, who asked the pertinent question, “Where is God?”, after the terrorist attacks in London and Manchester.

Her answer included the following: “God Has given us a choice to choose love or to choose evil. God took the risk of creating each of us to live in perfect relationship to God and one another and with our world.

We can each make choices which lead to destruction or lead to love and life. It’s not about life being perfect in material terms, not about never having pain or struggles but it is about discovering that we can each be free to be the people God has created us to be, to know that even in places of pain and darkness, God’s hope and life will always have the final word.”

Needless to say, the Bishop earned her purse. She struck me as an inspiring religious leader and I was very moved by her words.

3. Jewish Joke of the week – courtesy of (Lord) Danny Finkelstein.

“The dutiful son is by his father’s side as his dad lies dying. And the father says: “Son, is that your mother’s famous cheesecake I can smell baking? I would love just one last piece. Will you get it for me?” Shortly afterwards, the son returns from the kitchen. “Mum says you can’t have any. They’re for the funeral.”

4. AGM

A belated write up. We had our usual Sunday lunch nosh up at the Trumpet Inn, near Ledbury. We addressed the issue of our declining membership and the difficulties of attracting new members to the community, particularly families. The Council has worked hard to try to attract new members (or encourage old ones to rejoin us) but we have not been able to reverse the trend. We feel that the future direction probably lies in greater cooperation with the Gloucestershire community which is vibrant and growing and with whom we share Rabbi Anna. We already attended and were made very welcome at their Shavuot service and they have agreed to come to our Ann Frank service next year (see above). If we want to continue holding our own services and inviting rabbis to join us from London or elsewhere, we really do need to increase the numbers attending – up from the 8 to 10 regulars we can now count upon back to the 15 to 20 we were attracting not so long ago. So please make every effort to attend services in the coming year to give us the encouragement to carry on. And, of course, if there are other events you would like us to put on, please let one of the Council members know.

5. London Klezmer Quartet.

HJCKlez

Advance notice of the return of this very popular group – this time to the Savoy Theatre in Monmouth on Friday October 13 – the night before our Simchat Torah service in Monmouth! The last LKQ concert in Monmouth was a sell-out so make sure you get your tickets if you want to hear this very talented and exciting Klezmer group.

Charities: Note that the Charities adopted by HJC for the coming year are: Hereford Special Needs Baby Unit and the Charles Clore Centre, Acco Israel. We agreed at the AGM that both of these were very worthwhile causes. Further details in our next post re our High Holyday Charity Appeal.

Day of Celebration at Northwood and Pinner Liberal Synagogue

I started with Lessons from Yehudi Menuhin’s Menschlichkeit: Vision, Engagement & Impact by David Dolan, the first time I have had the chance to study this subject in a Liberal Jewish context. I did not know how many recordings of Menuhin were on YouTube and shall be following up the snippets we heard. “A violinist must play every day like a bird must fly every day” was a good opening remark, we heard how he insisted his students played in prisons, hospitals and underprivileged areas long before the Venezuela project showed the value of music for deprived children and adults. Alumni continue to teach, reducing crime by giving children things to do they enjoy, and building community and some fine orchestras and performers, and even instruments.

Menuhin himself went to Bergen-Belsen weeks after liberation with Benjamin Britten to play for displaced persons, German POWs and German people, seeing music as a weapon to fight savagery. He said it was time to start healing and show what Beethoven and Brahms can bring to the world again. Yehudi Menuhin saw Western music bringing harmony whereas Eastern music does wonderful things with rhythm. Classical Indian music is mostly improvised, Ravi Shankar taught him improvisation, Yehudi had been wedded to order after World War One. Www.medici.tv has a lot of these performances. It was a truly unusual and interesting session and a rare privilege to have it presented by David Dolan, himself an international concert pianist and educator, who worked for Yehudi Menuhin’s school in Surrey.

This was followed by Lord Alf Dubs who said he would be back to the new Government to get more refugees into this country and that the young people who helped refugees in Calais were wonderful people. Personally, I feel it is right to help those in need but equally we should be careful about whom we allow in to the UK and should be led by common sense, rather than by emotion.

In the afternoon, I went to a session led by Rabbi Charley Baginsky and James Sorene, Chief Executive of Bicom, which works with the British public and organisations to educate and inform. He warned that if the So-called Islamic State was defeated, trained fighters would disperse all over the world and a new Islamic force will arise from the instability, sooner or later. He took us through some of the power brokers and alliances in the Middle East and what it could mean for Israelis and Palestinians. He contrasted Presidents Obama and Trump, saying the latter is completely unpredictable. Obama was rational and logical, the Arabs could predict and outmanoeuvre him, they could see 10 steps ahead, whereas Trump does not even know himself what he will do next. In the UK we have a lever of power, we send a lot of aid to the Palestinian Authority, so we should try to reduce radicalisation in Palestinian schools by inspecting and making sure the children are not being taught to hate. Schools named after terrorists will not lead to peace. We could invest in dialogue as we did in Northern Ireland. In all, this was a wide-ranging session, with no easy answers but important questions.

Finally, came the LAFTA awards, chedarim had been asked to make a short film about what their community would look like in the Messianic Age, Crouch End were the winners with a short film about repair one step at a time, first self, then community and after that the world.

Alison Turner (edited).

Alison Turner continues:

After the Day of Celebration at Northwood and Pinner Liberal Synagogue, many of us went next door to the Northwood Methodist Church which had an excellent play put on jointly with the synagogue. This was 2067 – Hard New World about a society in which people over 70 were uploaded and only existed online. Naturally Judaism had a ceremony to mark this passing, and a family gathering for this led us on an exploration of whether people really were happy in their new lives, and a rebellion led by the children to restore their grandparents to them. This was an excellent end to an inspiring and very worthwhile day.

JW3 Parent and Baby Fest

This was an all day event at London’s Jewish Community Centre in Finchley, which I had only been to once before. The basement outside area had been transformed into a Tel Aviv beach scene, with a paddling pool for little ones, a sandy beach, and tables and chairs for onlookers and those sipping cocktails, or having food from the bar or kosher restaurant. There were also a few stalls, one from the Nursing and Carers group that sponsored the day. We had interactive puppet theatre for tinies, singing, classical music and cookery. Isaac was in his element of course, in and out of the water and playing in the sand. The

HJCJW3

first thing I had to do was get him a balloon from around the pool and take his shoes and socks off before he went in the water. Lots of Jewish mothers and fathers and security guards helped me keep an eye on him and rescued him when he tried to get in the lift without me. The area was very secure so even if I couldn’t see him I knew he couldn’t get away. PJ Library were also sponsors so we came away with a free book from their excellent collection. This one is about Noah’s wife Naamah singing the animals to sleep on the Ark.

JW3 has a huge range of activities – theatre, cinema, music, talks and discussions, art studio, adult learning classes and courses, food and drink, health and fitness. https://www.jw3.org.uk/ for more information. Worth looking at if you are planning a trip to London, I found the Baby Fest by chance when flicking through the brochure and we had a wonderful time. The beach continues as Hampstead Beach throughout the summer.

Shabbat service with Rabbi Margaret Jacobi

Rabbi Margaret Jacobi from Birmingham BPS, led a service for HJC on 22nd July. As always, she was pleased to come to Colwall, and lead a service for us. Several of us also joined in a study session prior to the service on the topic of Cities of refuge. This raised significant questions of ethic s and morality. How do we distinguish who is a murderer or who has committed manslaughter? What is the appropriate punishment for each of these crimes. It could be said that the Cities of refuge (for those committing manslaughter) were, for their time, an enlightened way of offering protection to those who had committed a lesser crime, and might otherwise be at risk of death from the common populace. We also learned, in passing, that the phrase ‘an eye for an eye’ did not necessarily mean punishment by physically taking out the aggressor’s eye, but more likely meant an appropriate monetary fine.

The following Shabbat service was both moving and thoughtful and we are very grateful to Margaret for continuing to support HJC in this way.

Yiddish

The Yiddish language is said to date from around the 10th century. It became the vernacular language of Ashkenazi Jews in Central and Eastern Europe. It is a Germanic language with a significant Hebrew-Aramaic component, and with vocabulary deriving from Slavic languages. Yiddish literature, incorporating folk culture, was already in evidence in the medieval period in a variety of forms. Modern Yiddish literature developed in the 19th century and by the eve of the Second World War, there existed a huge corpus of poetry, fiction, drama. There were regular performances of song recitals, operas, cabaret and plays in Eastern Europe, the USA and beyond. At this time, Yiddish was spoken by approximately 10-12 million Jews throughout the world.

Courtesy of Jewish Music Institute: https://www.jmi.org.uk/music-genres/yiddish/

The Yiddish-speaking world was seriously diminished by the Holocaust, by Stalinist repressions in the Soviet Union, and by immigration to Israel where Yiddish was actively discouraged. It has always been a stateless language and its speakers have moved around the globe from medieval times until the present.

Yiddish is a rich language with a complex history, a vibrant culture and an extraordinary literature. At present, there are approximately 1-2 million speakers, the majority belonging to the ultra-Orthodox and Hasidic communities. A smaller, separate group are descendants of Yiddish speakers who migrated to Israel, North and South America, Western Europe, South Africa or Australia. New Yiddish speakers are those who develop an interest in the language and its culture, and become speakers as a result of their passion and efforts. ‘ (JMI website as above).

Yiddish is an interesting language. It is written using the Hebrew alphabet, which makes it less accessible to many in its written form, but much of Yiddish vocabulary and grammar derives from German, with a healthy smattering of other East European languages. And of course a good dose of Hebrew thrown in. as many people say Yiddish is the language of the soul as well as that of everyday life. (JB)

My own Hebrew Journey

Like many people who grow up in a particular way, I did not realise that I was anything different from the ordinary, until years later when I moved away and lived in different Jewish communities. Not all communities, I realised, taught modern Hebrew, or used the modern Israeli pronunciation in their services. However, that is how it was in Sheffield, where I grew up, and while the Hebrew books we used, weren’t the most inspiring, they never the less began a grounding in me, which developed and bore fruit in later years.

I grew up with Hebrew and language. My mother was always interested in languages, and like many in the early days of the State of Israel, a keen Zionist. When she discovered that a local Jewish family had an Israeli au pair for their children, she was keen to take advantage of having a native Hebrew speaker in our small community in Sheffield. In those days we had a group of 10 – 15 adults who were all enthusiastic to learn and improve their modern Hebrew. We met in people’s houses, and the group ran for several years, very much depending on the Hebrew newspaper (LaMatchil) for new immigrants. I have to confess to becoming an upstart Hebrew teacher at age 14, though this lasted only for a couple of years.

Now many years later, I find myself as a Hebrew teacher, once again, without any proper credentials. It is true that my Hebrew has developed since I was a teenager, not least because I spent my first ever month in Israel in a kibbutz of 200 people, of whom only 2 spoke English, and most others spoke German, which I had no knowledge of at the time. Hence Hebrew was our only language in common.

I have also learned (modern) Hebrew through my brother in law’s family who live in Jerusalem, and who speak English, but often Hebrew is the preferred language.

However, I am definitely learning more from our Monmouth Hebrew group than I ever expected.

Julian Brown

Monmouth Hebrew Group

Monmouth Hebrew Group have now been running for almost two years, meeting monthly at Bridges Centre Monmouth. Whilst only a small group, we are strong on motivation and interest in the vagaries of Hebrew language – mainly classical but Modern Hebrew also makes itself known in a range of contexts. It’s amazing we keep going with our different background and ranges of ability, but in fact we can all contribute in different ways in our reading and interpretations of Torah texts, and hopefully, we have all gained some confidence in this. We also manage to have some fun, including eating fresh picked cherries at our last meeting (it has been a bumper cherry season this year) and also playing Hebrew bingo. We were joined in the last session by a part-time pastor, Paul Hocking, who is also a biblical scholar, and he has written about his ‘Hebrew Journey’ below

Learning Biblical Hebrew – Paul Hocking

HJCDeadScrolls

נֵר־לְרַגְלִי דְבָרֶךָ

וְאוֹר לִנְתִיבָתִי׃

A lamp to my feet your Word

& A light to my path. Ps 119:105

 

My interest in the Hebrew Scriptures started when I was young. Brought up in a devout Christian home, my father had a passion for the Bible. He came to love the Hebrew scriptures particularly, and their rich and vivid ways of setting out the purposes of God for His people.

This passion and gift ‘rubbed off’ on me, and I began to study the Bible from my teens. Later, in University, then teaching Biology, led me to discover what the Bible actually said, and drove me to delve into the original languages of Hebrew and Greek, at that stage, with the aid of Bibleworks software, interlinear translations and Bible Lexicons. It also gave me a life-long interest in ancient manuscripts, like those discovered in the Dead Sea vicinity.

Then an invite to teach students in a Bible College in Serbia for 2 weeks each year – 15 sessions on Leviticus (Vayyiqra) and 15 on Joshua (Yehoshua)! This meant further exploration of the Hebrew scriptures. People kept telling me I should write a book on the things I was teaching!

During a sabbatical time, I came across an independent Jewish scholar in Jerusalem, called Moshe Kline. He was a US citizen who had lived and been educated in the US, but then had made Aliyah and devoted himself to elucidating the structured nature of the Mishnah and then the Torah. I came across his ideas on his web site (chaver.com) and was absolutely amazed at his insight into the literary structure of the Torah, and Vayyiqra specifically. (If you want to get a flavour, enter The Creation Weave or The Exoteric Decalogue into your search engine). I contacted Moshe and he asked me if I would like to study the text of Vayyiqra with him via Skype. I was delighted to say yes – and that was 9 years ago! In our weekly sessions, we have since studied every unit of text in the whole Torah, and have started once again with Vayyiqra!

As I felt convinced that Moshe’s ideas were valid and, indeed, hugely illuminating, I was called to give up my paid employment, and register for a PhD at Chester University, to seek to evaluate his ideas in the context of the wider scholarly conversation. I felt sure the insights would be of value to Jewish and Christian believers. But, in order to pursue a PhD in Hebrew Bible Studies, I had to have a basic knowledge of the language! I felt the most efficient way to do this would be by self-studying for the OCR GCSE and then an A-level in my spare time. In my 60s, I registered each year, gaining an ‘A’ in GCSE after 2 years, and am now working for an ‘A’ at A-level after another 2 years! Onwards and upwards!

This study of the original language has certainly helped me with my study of the scriptures generally. I can see more clearly the graphic nature of the words and syntax, and have enjoyed many eureka moments when mediating on the poetic form, the parallelisms and the rhetoric that are so different from modern English.

Paul Hocking

Film Review – Left Luggage

This is a more light hearted look at the Chassidic world from the perspective of a young secular woman who gets a job as a Nanny to the children of a Chassidic family in Antwerp. While the film does come across as less than believable at times, it is never the less, a moving, and relevant film exploring especially the role of women in orthodox communities.

Julian Brown

Set in Antwerp, Belgium in the early 70’s, a tale about Chaja, an impetuous, liberal-minded philosophy student, and her complex relationship with her parents who are Holocaust survivors. With the help of a family friend, she secures a job as a nanny for a Hassidic Jewish family, the Kalmans, whose world and lifestyle are alien to her liberated self. Chaja adores the Kalmans’ five-year-old son Simcha and becomes emotionally attached to him. Through her relationship with the family she gains insight into the lives of her own parents, who are survivors of a concentration camp’.(Rotten Tomatoes).

Detailed review can be found here: http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/left-luggage-2001

Forthcoming Events

Rosh Hashanah Service and Meal at home of Eva Mendelsson, Wednesday 20th September, 6.30 p.m. in Ross on Wye. Booking Form attached and full details will be sent out on booking.

Subscriptions

HJC Subscriptions for 2017-18 are now due no later than 30th Sept 2017. Contact Mark Walton for Subscription Form. 

Deadline for next newsletter will be 22nd September 2017

Note that I have changed the deadline to fit with when contributions usually arrive, but note this is a Deadline, and if you miss this date, I cannot guarantee your contribution will be included.

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general, contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 words, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 500KB for newsletter inclusion. All contributions are welcome but depending on format and content, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

Herefordshire Jewish Community Contacts

Membership and Welfare

Chair

Cherry Wolfe

Mark Walton

mark.walton@bridgescentre.org.uk

Tel: 01594 530721

Treasurer

Newsletter Editor /Membership

Alison Turner

 

Julian Brown

 

Learning Circle Coordinator / Web Manager and Archivist

Cultural Coordinator

Alison Turner 

Ann Levy

 

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

High Holyday Dates

Wednesday 20th September

Erev Rosh Hashanah Service and Gathering

6.30 p.m.

Home of Eva Mendelsson, Ross on Wye, Herefordshire

GLJC Services

Thursday 21st Sept

Rosh Hashanah Morning service

1100 – 1400

t.b.a.

Friday 29th Sept

Kol Nidre

1900 – 2030

Up Hatherley Village Hall , Coldpool Lane, Cheltenham

Gloucestershire GL51 6JA

Sat 30th Sept

Yom Kippur Morning Service

1100 – 1430

t.b.a.

Sat 30th Sept

Yom Kippur Walk /Study session

1430 – 1630

t.b.a.

Sat 30th Sept

Yom Kippur Afternnon/Yizkor/Concluding service

1700 – 1930

t.b.a.

Sat 30th Sept

Breaking Fast/Chavurah supper

1930 – 2030

t.b.a.

Future HJC services and other Events

Friday 13th October

London Klezmer Quartet Concert

7.30 p.m.

Savoy Theatre, Church Street
Monmouth, Gwent
NP25 3BU

Saturday 14th October

Simchat Torah Service

11 a.m.

Bridges Centre, Monmouth NP25 5AS

Saturday 4th November t.b.c.

Lech Lecha Shabat Service led by student Rabbi

11 a.m.

Burgage Hall, Ledbury t.b.c.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herefordshire Jewish Community

Erev Rosh Hashanah Booking Form 2017

I/we would like to attend the evening Rosh Hashanah Service and meal on Wednesday 20th September. To be held at home of Eva Mendelsson, Ross on Wye, Herefordshire.

Cost: £7.50 per person.

Name (s)…………………………………………………………….

Number of persons………..

Meal preference (state number required if more than 1)

meat vegetarian

Cheque enclosed (payable to Herefordshire Jewish Community)

£………………….(amount)

Please return booking forms to:

Mark Walton

no later than Wednesday 7th September 2017 to confirm your place(s), as numbers are limited.

For address ring 01594 530721 (after 6pm or at weekends), or email mark.walton@bridgescentre.org.uk

Details of location will be sent on receipt of booking form.

l preference (state number required if more than 1)

meat vegetarian

Cheque enclosed (payable to Herefordshire Jewish Community)

£………………….(amount)

HJC Newsletter Pesach Edition – April/May 2017

Editorial

As we move between Purim and Pesach – two Jewish festivals both, in very different ways, telling stories of persecution and hatred of the Jews, it’s a good time to reflect on past and present. Are we living in a different age now, an age of interfaith understanding and cooperation, or are we in an age of “fear” against “the other” as illustrated by so many examples in the media, such as the recent airline travel ban relating to Muslim countries. This edition explores these themes – reflections on the story of Purim, a very brief look at the Pesach story (blink, or you may miss it) and more thorough look at Interfaith, as exemplified by the recent Gloucester Cathedral exhibition.

Two forthcoming events will give us an opportunity to explore these themes further. In June, we have our annual Anne Frank interfaith service, to be held at Saxon Hall Hereford, to which we will invite members of different faiths. In a different way, we also having our first (for a long time) joint service with Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish community, which will be an opportunity to create or renew relationships with members of another community.

The recent controversial discussions arising from the death of Martin McGuinness show us that there is not necessarily an easy distinction between those who are ‘the other’ and those who can help create peace. The Purim story, however fantastic it may be, tells the story of how an interfaith marriage resulted in the saving of the Jews. We need to remember, as highlighted the recent tributes to the Westminster attacks, that communication with other faiths and those of other views is something we must continue to value. JB

In this edition:

Chair Chat: Comment on LJS Hebrew Day Tu B’Shvat Seder Film review – Denial Gloucester Interfaith exhibition Purim Comment Pesach k’neidlach recipe Book Reviews – Christian and Jewish Women in Britain, 1880-1940; East-West street

CHAIR CHAT

1. “KEEP CALM AND LEARN HEBREW” AT THE LIBERAL JEWISH SYNAGOGUE.

This was a great study day, particularly for those interested in the Hebrew language. There were a variety of different learning tracks, ranging from “Hebrew from scratch” to “Speaking Ivrit”. I chose sessions based on textual analysis, which actually encompassed a lot of grammatical points. I particularly enjoyed Rabbi Alexandra Wright’s session on a portion from Jonah in which she introduced us to the concept of the conversive Vav (as opposed to the conjunctive Vav)! I was constantly surprised by the intricacies (and difficulties) of the Hebrew language and was impressed by the knowledge of those in my group (some of whom were recent converts or were in the process of converting) which put my barmitzvah class Hebrew, based on thrice weekly cheder sessions, to shame. I also enjoyed Rabbi Rachel Benjamin’s session on Psalm 23 and found Rabbi Rene Pferzel’s afternoon sessions on the Mishnah particularly fascinating. We ended up with a communal singing session led by Rachel Benjamin. A fantastic day which I would thoroughly recommend to anyone who wants to brush up their Hebrew. I was also struck by the vibrancy of the LJS community with their excellent educational and cultural programmes, the work they do to support asylum seekers and their wonderful triumvirate of rabbis.

2. TU B’SHVAT AND PURIM

It was a great pleasure for us to have Rabbi Anna lead these two innovative events. The Tu b’ Shvat Seder is an interesting concept and it was fascinating to hear from Anna how it evolved into the form it is today. Many thanks to Cherry for organising the food to help make the event such a meaningful and sociable evening.

Our Purim service was great fun, with the usual cacophony from assorted “gragers.” Thespian talents were displayed in Anna’s own dramatised version of the Purim story, a veritable “Purim spiel.” The story of Esther, Mordechai and Haman is one of the most enigmatic and puzzling narratives in the Old Testament but it makes for a racy story with a rather unpleasant ending. No wonder it was not celebrated during the early years of Liberal Judaism.

3. DENIAL

This film split the critics between those who felt it lacked drama and catharsis and those who felt it gave a very straightforward and clear account of the complexity of an extremely important court case. I am of the latter view and admired the way it tackled the subject without the need to patronise its viewers. The court victory in 2000 over the arch holocaust denier, David Irving, was not easily won and revealed just how labyrinthine and time-consuming the process of legally unpicking these falsehoods was. Even more worrying, was the fact that Irving’s views were believed by so many people. And, of course, although the court case resulted in a complete refutation of his work, holocaust denial has, if anything, become even stronger in recent years with the growth of radical anti-semitism. Clearly there is a warning from history here. An important film and well worth seeing.

4. JEWS AND CATHOLICS ON SKIING

On a lighter note, I was amused by this extract from an article I read recently. “David Aaronovitch has put the Jewish aversion to winter sports down to the fact that his people ‘are particularly uninterested in endangering ourselves for fun’, that Catholics, in comparison, ‘have a steady belief in their entitlement – given some properly observed formalities – to the afterlife and that they might be said to have few natural predators’.”

Esther’s Mission

As Rabbi Anna reminded us at our Purim service, the Book of Esther has the air of oriental extravagance about it. Everything is just a bit over the top, and like Jewish communities all over we celebrated it – with our own bit of dressing up and a jokey retelling of the tale (à la Anna).

So what exactly are we celebrating? Haman, feeling slighted by the king, intends the genocide of the Jews. But as a result of the intervention by the righteous Mordechai and his beautiful niece Esther – the brave but reluctant heroine – the genocide is averted. And Purim, which is the only Jewish festival not mentioned in the Torah, gets its raison d’etre from this tale.

But when we discussed it in our Hebrew class the week before, we began to realize that Esther is rather a strange text in the Hebrew canon. For there is no mention of God in it, only the enigmatic reference by Mordechai that deliverance will come ‘from another place’ (4.14) if Esther does not agree to play the role he proposes for her. The rabbis had somehow to account for the divine absence here, so they interpreted it as an instance of God being ‘hidden from view’ – but not of course actually absent. They made this point by means of a biblical proof text asking: “Where is Esther indicated in the Torah?” Answer: “In Deut.31:18: ‘I will surely hide (Heb: astir) my face’” (astir being a word play on Esther’s name).

In more recent times, some interpreters have found this ‘hiddenness’ of God less reassuring and more problematic. The Jewish philosopher Emil Fackenhenim in his book The Jewish Bible After the Holocaust claims that for the post-Shoah generation of Jews, the Book of Esther now becomes a central text – but with implications that are rather disturbing. Is the Purim story in fact an instance of where Jews achieved victory over their enemies through their own actions rather than through divine assistance? Was their victory just a series of lucky coincidences? What if the king had not been sleepless that night? Or Vashti hadn’t acted like a proto-feminist? Or Mordechai hadn’t overheard the plotters and reported it? All this becomes more poignantly real in the light of that genocide in which no help (or not enough) came from ‘another place’ and thousands of would-be Mordechais and nameless willing Esther’s never got the chance to save their people from extermination.

Yet perhaps we can rediscover the hiddenness of God in this biblical text for our own age. In his book Modernity and the Holocaust Jewish historian Zygmunt Baumann (who died recently) claimed that among the conditions that made the mass extermination of the Jews possible, the most decisive factor was that of modernity itself. For modern civilization, in its inexorable pursuit of economic progress, sets up an order which privileges only certain sections of the population and treats the rest as expendable. In the C20th Europe, the religiously rooted mythology of anti-semitism meant that the ‘expendable’ population became the Jews. Baumann returns to this theme in another book of his which I’m reading now called Wasted Lives: Modernity and its Outcasts. He shows how modernity’s global triumph intensifies the process of creating certain people as superfluous or redundant. Their role then becomes to serve as a focus for new political anxieties and security fears: categories of people, like immigrants, asylum seekers, benefit dependents, or tribal people getting in the way of progress, are treated as a form of human waste.

But this trashing of populations and people which modernity generates can be seen as incompatible the central command of Hebrew scriptures, which enjoins us to treat the life of fellow humans as holy: You shall be holy for I am holy (Lev.11.44). Perhaps Esther’s mission to save a threatened people has in our own time been extended.

Angela West

‘Face to Faith’ Art Exhibition by Russell Haines – Gloucester Cathedral

After seeing a wonderful copy of a painting of Rabbi Anna, in the J.C. announcing an Art Exhibition on Faith by artist Russell Haines, at the Cloisters in Gloucester Cathedral, I went along to view the whole exhibition.

The Cathedral itself is a most beautiful building with a wonderful atmosphere and a lovely service was just finishing as I went through to the Cloisters.  The exhibition consisted of 37 wonderful huge paintings of people who held different beliefs.  Alongside each of the paintings was the text explaining what the person’s faith meant to them. The quality of each painting was exceptional and the artist was truly inspired and gifted, and I found the whole exhibition very moving.

On looking at the background of the artist later, I was amazed that he had only been painting a few years and had taken up art as a therapy to help his recovery after having a severe stroke.  He found he was unable to continue his main work as a builder and electrician and gradually had to start from scratch to rebuild his life and pick up the threads again.

This is an artist to look out for in the future.  I understand that he wishes to take this exhibition around the UK and abroad and hopes to continue the whole project with the theme of ‘Hope’ and then ‘Charity’.

For me it was so uplifting to read of Russell’s own life journey and the courage it must have taken to keep going and face such huge challenges and find what a wonderful creative gift he had to share as he recovered. It is so uplifting that he has found a way to inspire others who are challenged and not give up.

In terms of the exhibition, the message it contains for me is to be respectful of each person’s belief and let’s learn to live in harmony and peace together.  

As for Russell’s work – the perception and heart he put into each painting was truly exceptional and I feel privileged to have had the opportunity to view the whole exhibition.  

Shirley G

Face to Faith Exhibition – further comment

gloucesterpic

Cherry and I went to this exhibition on a grey Saturday afternoon, having been told about it by Shirley Goldstein. It was certainly a stunning exhibition, set up along three sides of the cathedral cloisters and consisting of 37 larger-than-life sized portraits of leaders and members of different faiths. These included everything you could imagine from Rasta to Wicca to Runic to atheist, in addition to all the major world religions, with all of the individuals portrayed, living in or near Gloucester. The painting of Rabbi Anna Gerard, near the start of the exhibition, was very impressive and her writing as always, was moving and inspiring.

The paintings, in acrylic/oils are bold, bright, colourful, in your face with lots of primary colours as well as pieces of text woven into the fabric of the painting. It seems like a very bold step for such a wide-ranging exhibition to be mounted in the cathedral and indeed it has not been without local controversy with vandalism and attacks on the cathedral website resulting from the Islamic call to Prayer being recited at the initial exhibition launch. You can see more details of this at:

http://www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk/organisers-hit-out-at-inappropriate-claims-after-muslim-call-to-prayer-at-gloucester-cathedral/story-30065568-detail/story.html

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/feb/12/vandals-artworks-gloucester-cathedral-religions-death-threats

I hope, that as Shirley Goldstein points out, this exhibition can have a successful tour in other locations, and we are thankful to Gloucester Cathedral and Rev. Ruth Fitter who helped organise the exhibition.

Julian Brown

Book Review

Author: Dr Anne Summers
Title: Christian and Jewish women in Britain, 1880-1940 : living with difference.
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
Cost: hardcover £66.99; ebook £52.99; Chapters available from £23.94

Special offer – 20% discount on printed book or eBook using the token on palgrave.com PM1&TWENTY, valid until 05/06/2017.

HJCSummers

This is a series of vignettes of mainly Christian and Jewish women, their friendships, political campaigning and social works. Lily Montagu and Netta Franklin each have a chapter, so there is much of Liberal Jewish interest. It is very well-researched, each short chapter has pages of references. Miss Lily’s close ties with Margaret McDonald are explored and Netta’ close friendship with Charlotte Mason. Interfaith initiatives in the 1880s and 1890s in Salford and Manchester come from a wish to help poor women in entirely practical ways, such as the provision of soap, nurses and holidays for children. As on the Continent, there was co-operation between Jews and Christians to combat the social evil of prostitution, by appointing a dock agent to meet new arrivals and take them to safe suitable accommodation. Jews were seen as Honorary Protestants in some cases and invited on committees where Catholics were not. Constance Flower was an important bridge between the two groups, as she was born a Rothschild.

Dr Summers reckons it was these good relations that led to so much help from non-Jews for refugees from Nazism, in particular from Quakers, the National Council of Women and Save the Children among many other groups.

This is followed by chapters on Rebecca Sieff on English women and Zionism and finally on the very current topics of refuge and asylum. She concludes that in England there was a culture of decency interwoven with the ambiguities which bedevil all private and public relationships. The culture of wishing for neighbourliness and understanding must be embraced by senior clergy of Christianity, Islam and Judaism, not just a moderate liberal few individuals.
This is a very timely study for today, well written and very widely researched. I recommend this to all synagogue libraries, but the price is unfortunately high for many people. Light is thrown on many small groups, such as the Jewish Peace Society of 1914 and COPEC the Conference on Politics, Economics and Citizenship in 1924. This is an important contribution to our understanding of Britain in the late 19th century and up to the interwar years. Very readable and welcome as a contribution to the history of multiculturalism in Britain.

Alison Turner

Book review – East-West Street

Phillipe Sands, Penguin Random House

HJCeastwest

This is not a book for the faint hearted, dealing as it does with the origins of the crimes of Genocide, and Crimes against Humanity which were first established at the Nuremburg trials in 1945. However, it is also not too difficult a read, as it is also the personal story of the family history of the author, himself an expert in International Law. It traces the personal histories of the two eminent Law experts who first drafted the definition of these crimes, Hersche Lauterpacht and Raphael Lemkin, and also follows that of Hans Frank, the German Governor of Occupied Poland, and Hitler’s legal expert, who was one of those tried in Nuremburg, and whose son came to be a friend of the author while he was researching this book. This a very well researched account of middle Europe in the years leading up to 1939 and subsequent events during the war and in its immediate aftermath. I found this book fascinating, but at the same time, it is very much a factual narrative, as you may expect from a lawyer, but for me, it was sometimes lacking in emotion.

For more information, See: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/may/22/east-west-street-origin-genocide-crimes-against-humanity-philippe-sands-review

JB

KlezNorth 2017

HJCKleznorth

This is an opportunity to indulge yourself in Klezmer music, dance, and song. Only for Klezmer fanatics but a lot of fun, especially if it coincides with Purim, as this year. The event is held in the attractive village of Youlgrave in Derbyshire, with main activities taking place in the village hall, and workshops held in other locations throughout the village. You don’t have to be an instrumentalist, or even a singer to attend KlezNorth, but you do need to be prepared to participate, including helping with some of the practical/domestic tasks needing to be done over the weekend. Workshops on Yiddish Song, late night klezmer dancing and a wonderful Yiddish workshop/Purimspiel, at which we did yet another ludicrous re- enactment of the Purim story, were some of the highlights of the event. Catering was excellent, and accommodation is in the local Youth Hostel or local B&B’s. Recommended.

Julian & Cherry

Pesach K’neidlach Recipe (matzo balls)

I have tried various kneidle recipes and generally not got the nice fluffy texture that I was aiming for. However, this recipe I have found to be foolproof and comes from Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi’s Jerusalem cookbook.

HJCKneidlach

Perfect Kneidlach (makes 12-15)

2 large eggs

40g margarine or chicken fat, melted and allowed to cool a bit

2 tbsp finely chopped parsley

75g matzo meal

4 tbsp soda water

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Whisk the eggs until frothy then whisk in the melted fat. Add ½ a teaspoon of salt, some black pepper and the parsley. Gradually stir in the matzo meal followed by the soda water and stir to a uniform paste. Cover the bowl and chill until cold and firm, at least an hour or two and up to a day ahead.

Line a baking sheet with cling film. Using your wet hands and a spoon, shape the batter into balls the size of small walnuts and place on the baking sheet

Drop the matzo balls into a large pot of boiling salted water. Cover partially with a lid and reduce the heat to low. Simmer gently until tender, about 30 minutes.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the kneidlach to a clean baking sheet to cool and then be chilled for up to a day, or they can go straight into the soup. Another option is to freeze them.

Cherry Wolfe

Members Welfare

Judith Labelter:

Some of you will have seen Judith Labelter at the last service and know that she is much improved, and now back at home, but still needs to improve further, and build up her strength. We wish her well for the future.

Pre-Pesach Story

Herschele Ostropolye is a Jewish wise guy who lived in the 18th Century near Mezhbizh in Southern Ukraine.

Here is a sample story relating to Pesach.

Herschele had a stall in the market where he was selling bric a brac including one item which was a large blank canvas. A passer-by came up and asked Herschele what sort of a painting it was. Herschele replied ‘If you give me a shekel, I’ll tell you all about it’. The curious punter paid over his shekel, and Herschele told him it was a famous painting of the Jews being chased by the Egyptians across the Red Sea.

So’, says the punter, ‘Where are the Jews?’

Oh, they’ve crossed already’

And where are the Egyptians?’

Oh, they haven’t come yet’.

The punter, now feeling really exasperated continues:

Nu, and where is the Red Sea?’

It’s parted.’

Courtesy of Wikipedia

Forthcoming Events
Our next HJC community meeting will be the Pesach Seder at Saxon Hall, Hereford on 13th April. Bookings are now closed, but contact Cherry Wolfe for any queries about this event.

AGM As last year, this will be a social event where we can relax in more comfortable surroundings and take the opportunity to review the community activities of the past year, and look at where we are going as a community.

AGM Sunday 7th May, Trumpet Inn, Ledbury, 1130 – 1230 followed by Social lunch. Please give in your menu choices on arrival.

Anne Frank Interfaith Service – Saturday 10th June 2017, Saxon Hall Hereford. We are hoping to have representatives of other faiths and local organisations present at this service which will be led this year by Rabbi Anna Gerrard.

Friday 28th April Interfaith Coffee morning, cakes, plant sale, raffle 10 – 12 Forbury Chapel , Leominster HR6 8NH

Herefordshire Interfaith Group

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 May 2017

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general, contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 words, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 500KB for newsletter inclusion. All contributions are welcome but depending on format and content, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Wed 12th April Passover Seder meal 6.30 p.m. Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford, HR2 6HE
Sunday 7th May AGM at Trumpet Inn, followed by Social lunch 11.30 a.m. Trumpet Inn, Ledbury, Ledbury Rd, Trumpet HR8 2RA
Saturday 27th May Shavuoth Shared Service with GLJC 11 a.m. Up Hatherley Village Hall Shiloh, Swindon Lane, Cheltenham GL51 9QG
Saturday 10th June Ann Frank service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard – open to other faiths 11 a.m. Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford, HR2 6HE
Sunday 18th June Film Session – Ushpezin, and Tea 4 p.m. Belmont Community Centre, Eastholme Avenue, Hereford HR2 7UQ
Friday 28th April HIFG Interfaith Coffee morning, cakes, plant sale, raffle 10 – 12 Forbury Chapel , Leominster HR6 8NH

 

Herefordshire Jewish Community Contacts

Email hjc@liberaljudaism.org Mark Walton

Tel: 01594 530721 (after 6pm or at weekends)

 

   
   
 

Interfaith event Leominster

Herefordshire Interfaith Forum is having a Face to Faith event on Tue 5 July 7-9pm at Leominster Methodist Church, Green Lane, Leominister HR6 8QJ

You are warmly invited to an informal evening to celebrate the different faith communities in Herefordshire. Learn about our different faiths through friendship, conversation, readings and music. Light refreshments.

For further details contact Frances Biseker 01568 612406

HJC should have a table with artefacts and prayer shawls to show people what sorts of things we do. Yes, we have been invited to bring fruit or vegetarian finger food to share and of course we will, eating together is an important part of what HJC does.

Liberal Judaism South West Regional Shabbaton

A relaxing day of Jewish learning, Shabbat services,
interesting workshops, youth activities and great food. An opportunity to meet, pray, learn, study and eat together with friends and teachers old and new.

On: Saturday 28th November 2015, 10am to 6pm
At:  Jury’s Inn, Swindon, Fleming Way, SN1 2NG

Cost: £20 for adults, £5 for children (Includes lunch & refreshments)

Book online: www.tunyurl.com/southwestshabbaton

Or call Aaron Abraham at Liberal Judaism on 0207 631 9830

This is a Liberal Judaism event, kindly sponsored by the NLPS Trust.

Subjects of the day will include:

Torah
Liturgy
Havdallah
Music
Youth
Identity
Debate

Shabbat
Food
Meditation
Siddur
Refugees
Craft
Discussion

This is a joint event by Liberal Jewish communities in:

Bristol & West
Wessex
Oxford
Reading
Herefordshire
Gloucestershire

 

Herefordshire Jewish Community Newsletter August/September 2015

Editorial

We will soon be approaching the High Holydays, but before that we have the month of Elul which is traditionally a time of reflection and introspection, in preparation for the New Year and Yom Kippur. As well as reflecting on our own deeds over the past year, this year, we also have a duty to think about others. For the first time, for this month of August, Liberal and Reform Judaism have linked up with the Council for Christians and Jews (CCJ) in a joint initiative entitled ‘If not now, when?’ This encourages us to take action on the persecution of Christian communities in the Middle East, which is sadly currently taking place in dramatic fashion, and which reminds us of the persecution we have similarly have encountered in previous times. I recently read an interview with one Christian refugee fleeing from persecution (and there will surely be others) who was amongst those in the so called migrant camp at Calais, so we need to remember that each person in the camp has a story, and remember also that many of our community are descended from refugees to this country.

Looking ahead to the HJC calendar for the next few months, we have a wide variety of activities to take part in – social, cultural and educational, as well as services. This year we are taking part in the South West small communities Shabbaton in November, which will include a day of workshops, talks, and activities which should have something to suit all members, and we hope to have a contingent attending from HJC. We can also look forward to a performance in Monmouth by London Klezmer Quartet in December, which, while not sponsored by HJC, will surely be an event we might like to attend. Finally, at this time of review, we are always looking for different ideas for activities within our own community, so if you have a particular interest which you think may suit other HJC members, let us know.

Julian Brown

In this edition:

Chair Chat Anne Frank Day Danny Rich Service

Month of Reflection Book Review Hereford Food Bank

Etgar Keret –Israeli Essayist Forthcoming Events

CHAIR CHAT

NEW LJ SIDDUR

There is a regular LJ Chair email forum which I rarely contribute to. However, I did join in this one as there seemed to be a growing feeling that we didn’t really need another siddur, it would be expensive and time consuming to produce and costly for small communities to replace their existing siddurim. Some communities said they actually preferred the Reform siddur and I suggested that if there was to be a new one then it should be a joint progressive undertaking between LJ and the Reform movement so that it could be used by congregations in both organisations, combining the best elements from both traditions. I also personally prefer the Reform siddur with translations and explanations of the rationale and origin of certain prayers on the same page. It was suggested that my proposal would never be accepted as a combined prayer book would be seen as the “thin end of the wedge” in encouraging a merger between the two organisations. What would be the problem with that? Which leads into …..

REFORM MOVEMENT AND PATRILINEALITY

Very encouraging that the Reform rabbis are seriously considering this which is now the only outstanding doctrinal difference between the two movements. See, http://news.reformjudaism.org.uk/press-releases/reform-rabbis-balance-tradition-and-welcome.html

There is also an interesting clip on the subject of patrilineality on the BBC website of a discussion between Reform Rabbi Jonathan Romain and Dr Yaakov Wise representing orthodoxy – no meeting of minds between the two!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b062hn6n

Is there any logical reason now for the two movements not to combine to form one strong and influential Progressive voice?

Mark Walton

Anne Frank Day

Members of Herefordshire Jewish Community were privileged to take part in a joint interfaith celebration/commemoration on the theme of ‘courage’ to mark Anne Frank day on Friday 12th June, in order to remember children who have been killed through war and conflict, as well as to commemorate the courage of all those who have given their service to protect our own rights and freedoms in recent times.

Both Christian and Jewish services contributed to the atmosphere of the occasion, as more than 70 people gathered outside the Community centre to see the garden of remembrance, the tree planted in honour of Anne Frank, and the unveiling of a plaque in honour of Anne Frank and other children. It felt a very unified occasion with both Reverend Philip Brown and Rabbis Danny Rich and Anna Gerrard leading thoughtful and moving prayers to mark the occasion. It was wonderful to see so many representatives of Hereford City, Church, ex-service personnel and community organisations, praying together with members of the Jewish community. Singing by teenagers from a local school as well as bugle playing added to the sense of the occasion.

The services were followed by a magnificent tea in Saxon Hall. This gave everyone an opportunity to socialise as well as to see the photographic exhibition on the life of Anne Frank, and watch a video presentation of the development of the remembrance garden. Presentations were made to members of Hereford College who had worked on the creation of the garden.

The final part of the day was a Friday evening Erev Shabbat service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard of Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish Community and Rabbi Danny Rich, Chief executive of Liberal Judaism. A smaller number of Christian visitors joined in with this service together with members of Hereford Jewish Community. In addition, everyone seemed to be both surprised and impressed by the impromptu question and answer session offered by Rabbi Danny Rich. This covered a wide variety of aspects of Jewish faith, including the different strands of Judaism, the origins of Liberal and progressive Judaism, women Rabbis, our relationship with the Five Books of Moses, and attitudes to Israel.

In all, this was a very worthwhile occasion and shows what can be achieved through cooperation of many disparate groups and interests who have a shared vision and purpose. Hereford Jewish Community are very grateful to Centre Manager, Victoria Craig and Chair of Trustees, Peter Cocks for their commitment and enormous hard work in organising this event.

Julian Brown

Shabbat Service 11 July with Rabbi Danny Rich

Due to illness in Marc Turner’s family, the naming ceremony for baby Isaac had to be postponed. However despite this, Rabbi Danny Rich was still kind enough to lead a service for us in Hereford Scout Hut which around 14 of us attended. The venue was a welcome change in a pleasant setting.

The parasha for the week was Pinchas. As usual Danny had much to say on a range of topics. He began by talking about Pinchas’ zealotry in killing Jews who had been consorting with Midianites, which even some of Pinchas’ compatriots did not necessarily approve of. Danny went on to talk about the need for care over the way we understand the Torah Law. Just because there is a law does not necessarily mean we have to implement it, so while Pinchas was within his legal rights to kill the men who had been with the Midianite women, he did not necessarily need to exercise this right – perhaps there could have been some other form of punishment. He also then alluded to the actions of ISIS in the name of Islam, and pointed out that even if violent punishment is prescribed in the Koran, Muslims today can choose not to exercise that right.

He also spoke about the transfer of leadership from Moses to Joshua which we read in the Torah piece, and from Elijah to Elisha which we read in the Haftarah. In both cases the successor was someone offering more thought and introspection compared with the charismatic and more outgoing figure that preceded him, but this was what was required at the time.

We are all very grateful for Danny making his second visit to HJC within a month. 

Hereford Food Bank

We are still collecting for Hereford and Malvern Food Banks at all services.

Please buy just one extra item from this list and leave it at our collection point.

Items requested by Hereford Food Bank are:

  • Tins: Meat – hot or cold; vegetables; fruit; rice pudding.
  • Dry goods: Smash potato; rice; powdered custard; dried milk; instant coffee; sugar.
  • General: UHT milk; pasta sauce; jam; marmalade; instant/microwave meals.
  • Hygiene: Shampoo; toothpaste; soap; household cleaners e.g. washing up liquid, detergent.

Thank you. Any queries please contact them on 01432 353347

Welfare – Andrea is currently housebound but improving gradually and in receipt of good regular care visits. Rosalie had a fall on the road several weeks ago and is much improved.

BBooook Review – The Dogs and the Wolves by Irène Némirovsky

Book review – Irene Nemirovsky – The Dogs and The Wolves.

Irene Némirovksy’s name may be known as the author of Suite Française, which became a film shown in cinemas earlier this year. However she wrote several other works, and I read The Dogs and The Wolves whilst in France this summer. Irene Némirovksy came from a wealthy Russian Jewish family who settled in Paris in 1920, and wrote her novels in French. The Dogs & The Wolves was published in 1940, only 2 ½ years before her deportation to Auschwitz, where she died from typhus, soon after.

This is a story of Jewish society, in particular the relationships between the lowest ranks and those at the top of the pile. It tells the story of Ada, born amongst the poorest ranks in a ghetto in Ukraine, and her cousin Ben, born amongst the highest ranks. It tells of their lives as children in the city in Ukraine in the early years of the20th century, and the subsequent life in Paris, where Ada becomes an artist, and Ben a businessman. It is a powerful and passionate book, though when I began reading it, there was little hint of how dramatic the story would become. It tells a fascinating tale of life for Jews (though not particularly observant ones) in both Ukraine and as emigrés in Paris. Némirovksy’s writing is vivid and very visual, and I would recommend this as very worthwhile.. To quote from the Jewish Women’s Archive: Irene Nemirovski was a writer….. ‘who could look inside the human soul and make music with words’. JB

Etgar Keret – The Seven Good Years – Comment

Etgar Keret is a 47 year old Israeli novelist who has recently published a collection of essays entitled ‘The Seven Good Years’ coming from the biblical story of Pharaoh’s dream of seven fat-fleshed cows and seven lean and scrawny cows standing by a river. Joseph was called on for an interpretation and explains that seven years of abundance are coming to Egypt followed by seven years of famine.

Keret explains, ‘the seven good years were the years when I was able to be both son to my father and father to my son, when I could look back and see my past and look forward and see my future’. His parents were Holocaust survivors: his father survived by living for almost 600 days in a ‘hole in the ground’ outside a Polish village. His parents wanted their children to have richer lives spiritually rather than materially.

Seven Good Years’ is not published in Israel as it is intended to communicate the Israeli reality to an outside world that sees the Israel-Palestine situation in a very black and white ‘goodies and baddies’ way and resists the idea that the reality might be more complex.

Keret writes opinion pieces on the conflict for both the Israeli and international press. In Israel, as a liberal left wing Israeli writing against the government and the Gaza war people would boycott him saying he was a traitor, and overseas people would boycott him as an Israeli. This shows the dilemma Keret faces in expressing his views.

The Seven Good Years is published by Granta. For further information see Guardian Article at: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/aug/01/etgar-keret-books-interview-israel-the-seven-good-years

Cherry Wolfe

Month of Reflection CCJ – If not now, when?

This initiative aims to encourage the Jewish community to engage in prayer and spiritual reflection on the persecution of Christians in the Middle East, extending the circle of spiritual engagement from the Christian community into the Jewish community and beyond. In conjunction with our Still An Issue initiative raising awareness of antisemitism and encouraging a response within the Christian community, we are bringing the communities closer together through profound engagement with one another’s key issues.

The spiritual engagement on this issue will be centred around the month of August, providing a focal point for the response, but we expect and intend the initiative to continue beyond this with further engagement throughout the year. A nationwide response to the persecution of Christians in the Middle East, the initiative is endorsed by our Presidents from across the Christian and Jewish spectrums.

To provide a springboard for prayer and other forms of spiritual reflection, we have created a general resource with information about Christians in the Middle East and ideas for personal and communal responses. This is supplemented by resources written by individual rabbis that may be more appropriate for use in certain denominations that also provide a more personal response to this issue. All of these resources can be found here.

There are plenty of ways for individuals or communities to engage in the initiative, either separately or coming together. You could:

  • Arrange a reciprocal visit between the local Church and Synagogue

  • Hold a cross-communal vigil, potentially in conjunction with the local CCJ branch

  • Host a joint educational event with a speaker on this issue

For more ideas, please contact cjrelations@ccj.org.uk.

Council for Christians and Jews

Background to Christian Persecution in the Middle East – see next page.

If not now, when?

There are many references in the T’nach and commentaries as to how and why we should treat others (non-Jews) fairly.

  • we are all created b’tselem Elokim – in the image of God. We believe that every person is equally significant before the divine, all human beings are equal, all human beings are unique and most importantly all human beings are of infinite value (Tzelem UK mission statement).

  • Rabbi John Rayner wrote in Siddur Lev Chadash concerning peace, that we are required ‘to denounce injustice, not only when it is committed against us, but also when it is committed against others; to defend human rights, not only our own, but theirs….’

  • Our Rabbis have taught: We support the poor of the Gentiles along with the poor of Israel, and visit the sick of the Gentiles along with the sick of Israel, and bury the poor of the Gentiles along with the dead of Israel, for these are the ways of peace. Babylonian Talmud Gittin 61a

Reform & Liberal Judaism

Forthcoming Events

Limmud in the Woods

Exploring Jewish life… Radical Simplicity. 
August bank holiday weekend 27 – 31 August 2015

Limmud in the Woods is a unique event. We spend 5 days building our own community in the countryside, sleeping under canvas and experiencing top quality Jewish learning, activities in the great outdoors and events late into the night.

Cot £199– 5 days, £100 – 2 days, £60 – one day

South West Regional Shabbaton Swindon, Saturday November 28 2015 including HJC. Communities involved will include Bristol, Gloucestershire, Oxford, Reading, Wessex and Herefordshire.

HJC are actively participating in planning of this event, so we hope that as many members as possible will be able to attend the day. Previous Shabbatons have been thoroughly enjoyed by all who have attended. Further details available soon.

London Klezmer Quartet – Monmouth, Saturday 5th December. This is one of the premier Klezmer groups in the country, and we are lucky that they will be playing relatively locally. This should be a wonderful evening, so do save the date.

 

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Sunday 13 September

Re-consecration of tombstones, followed by evening Rosh Hashanah service , led by Mark Walton

4.00 p.m. &

5.30 p.m.

Hereford Cemetery

Then at Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Tuesday 22 September

Yom Kippur Kol Nidrei service- led by Julian Brown

7 p.m.

Catholic Church Ledbury t.b.c.

Friday 2nd October

Simchat Torah Service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

7 p.m.

Bridges Centre, Monmouth

Saturday 24th October

Shabbat Service, Lech Lecha, led by student Rabbi (t.b.c.)

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

Sat 21st November

Shabbat Service, led by Julian Brown. This will be a service focusing on Hebrew and learning.

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

Saturday 12th December

Chanukah service and party led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

3 p.m.

Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Other Events of Interest

Saturday 28 November

South West Regional Shabbaton

Day event

Swindon

Saturday 5 December

London Klezmer Quarter performance,

evening

Bridges Centre, Monmouth.

Subscriptions

Note that subscriptions for HJC were due by 31 July, so if you have not already sent yours in, please send to HJC Treasurer, Hanna Wine, as soon as possible.

For more information or to join our community please contact our Chair: Mark Walton  mark.walton@bridgescentre.org.uk  Tel: 01594 530721 (eve)

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 September

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 words, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures are also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

Book Review – The Dogs and the Wolves by Irène Némirovsky

Hereford Food Bank

We are still collecting for Hereford and Malvern Food Banks at all services.

Please buy just one extra item from this list and leave it at our collection point.

Items requested by Hereford Food Bank are:

Tins: Meat – hot or cold; vegetables; fruit; rice pudding.

Dry goods: Smash potato; rice; powdered custard; dried milk; instant coffee; sugar.

General: UHT milk; pasta sauce; jam; marmalade; instant/microwave meals.

Hygiene: Shampoo; toothpaste; soap; household cleaners eg washing up liquid, detergent.

Thank you.

Any queries please contact them on 01432 353347