HJC Newsletter Pesach Edition – April/May 2017

Editorial

As we move between Purim and Pesach – two Jewish festivals both, in very different ways, telling stories of persecution and hatred of the Jews, it’s a good time to reflect on past and present. Are we living in a different age now, an age of interfaith understanding and cooperation, or are we in an age of “fear” against “the other” as illustrated by so many examples in the media, such as the recent airline travel ban relating to Muslim countries. This edition explores these themes – reflections on the story of Purim, a very brief look at the Pesach story (blink, or you may miss it) and more thorough look at Interfaith, as exemplified by the recent Gloucester Cathedral exhibition.

Two forthcoming events will give us an opportunity to explore these themes further. In June, we have our annual Anne Frank interfaith service, to be held at Saxon Hall Hereford, to which we will invite members of different faiths. In a different way, we also having our first (for a long time) joint service with Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish community, which will be an opportunity to create or renew relationships with members of another community.

The recent controversial discussions arising from the death of Martin McGuinness show us that there is not necessarily an easy distinction between those who are ‘the other’ and those who can help create peace. The Purim story, however fantastic it may be, tells the story of how an interfaith marriage resulted in the saving of the Jews. We need to remember, as highlighted the recent tributes to the Westminster attacks, that communication with other faiths and those of other views is something we must continue to value. JB

In this edition:

Chair Chat: Comment on LJS Hebrew Day Tu B’Shvat Seder Film review – Denial Gloucester Interfaith exhibition Purim Comment Pesach k’neidlach recipe Book Reviews – Christian and Jewish Women in Britain, 1880-1940; East-West street

CHAIR CHAT

1. “KEEP CALM AND LEARN HEBREW” AT THE LIBERAL JEWISH SYNAGOGUE.

This was a great study day, particularly for those interested in the Hebrew language. There were a variety of different learning tracks, ranging from “Hebrew from scratch” to “Speaking Ivrit”. I chose sessions based on textual analysis, which actually encompassed a lot of grammatical points. I particularly enjoyed Rabbi Alexandra Wright’s session on a portion from Jonah in which she introduced us to the concept of the conversive Vav (as opposed to the conjunctive Vav)! I was constantly surprised by the intricacies (and difficulties) of the Hebrew language and was impressed by the knowledge of those in my group (some of whom were recent converts or were in the process of converting) which put my barmitzvah class Hebrew, based on thrice weekly cheder sessions, to shame. I also enjoyed Rabbi Rachel Benjamin’s session on Psalm 23 and found Rabbi Rene Pferzel’s afternoon sessions on the Mishnah particularly fascinating. We ended up with a communal singing session led by Rachel Benjamin. A fantastic day which I would thoroughly recommend to anyone who wants to brush up their Hebrew. I was also struck by the vibrancy of the LJS community with their excellent educational and cultural programmes, the work they do to support asylum seekers and their wonderful triumvirate of rabbis.

2. TU B’SHVAT AND PURIM

It was a great pleasure for us to have Rabbi Anna lead these two innovative events. The Tu b’ Shvat Seder is an interesting concept and it was fascinating to hear from Anna how it evolved into the form it is today. Many thanks to Cherry for organising the food to help make the event such a meaningful and sociable evening.

Our Purim service was great fun, with the usual cacophony from assorted “gragers.” Thespian talents were displayed in Anna’s own dramatised version of the Purim story, a veritable “Purim spiel.” The story of Esther, Mordechai and Haman is one of the most enigmatic and puzzling narratives in the Old Testament but it makes for a racy story with a rather unpleasant ending. No wonder it was not celebrated during the early years of Liberal Judaism.

3. DENIAL

This film split the critics between those who felt it lacked drama and catharsis and those who felt it gave a very straightforward and clear account of the complexity of an extremely important court case. I am of the latter view and admired the way it tackled the subject without the need to patronise its viewers. The court victory in 2000 over the arch holocaust denier, David Irving, was not easily won and revealed just how labyrinthine and time-consuming the process of legally unpicking these falsehoods was. Even more worrying, was the fact that Irving’s views were believed by so many people. And, of course, although the court case resulted in a complete refutation of his work, holocaust denial has, if anything, become even stronger in recent years with the growth of radical anti-semitism. Clearly there is a warning from history here. An important film and well worth seeing.

4. JEWS AND CATHOLICS ON SKIING

On a lighter note, I was amused by this extract from an article I read recently. “David Aaronovitch has put the Jewish aversion to winter sports down to the fact that his people ‘are particularly uninterested in endangering ourselves for fun’, that Catholics, in comparison, ‘have a steady belief in their entitlement – given some properly observed formalities – to the afterlife and that they might be said to have few natural predators’.”

Esther’s Mission

As Rabbi Anna reminded us at our Purim service, the Book of Esther has the air of oriental extravagance about it. Everything is just a bit over the top, and like Jewish communities all over we celebrated it – with our own bit of dressing up and a jokey retelling of the tale (à la Anna).

So what exactly are we celebrating? Haman, feeling slighted by the king, intends the genocide of the Jews. But as a result of the intervention by the righteous Mordechai and his beautiful niece Esther – the brave but reluctant heroine – the genocide is averted. And Purim, which is the only Jewish festival not mentioned in the Torah, gets its raison d’etre from this tale.

But when we discussed it in our Hebrew class the week before, we began to realize that Esther is rather a strange text in the Hebrew canon. For there is no mention of God in it, only the enigmatic reference by Mordechai that deliverance will come ‘from another place’ (4.14) if Esther does not agree to play the role he proposes for her. The rabbis had somehow to account for the divine absence here, so they interpreted it as an instance of God being ‘hidden from view’ – but not of course actually absent. They made this point by means of a biblical proof text asking: “Where is Esther indicated in the Torah?” Answer: “In Deut.31:18: ‘I will surely hide (Heb: astir) my face’” (astir being a word play on Esther’s name).

In more recent times, some interpreters have found this ‘hiddenness’ of God less reassuring and more problematic. The Jewish philosopher Emil Fackenhenim in his book The Jewish Bible After the Holocaust claims that for the post-Shoah generation of Jews, the Book of Esther now becomes a central text – but with implications that are rather disturbing. Is the Purim story in fact an instance of where Jews achieved victory over their enemies through their own actions rather than through divine assistance? Was their victory just a series of lucky coincidences? What if the king had not been sleepless that night? Or Vashti hadn’t acted like a proto-feminist? Or Mordechai hadn’t overheard the plotters and reported it? All this becomes more poignantly real in the light of that genocide in which no help (or not enough) came from ‘another place’ and thousands of would-be Mordechais and nameless willing Esther’s never got the chance to save their people from extermination.

Yet perhaps we can rediscover the hiddenness of God in this biblical text for our own age. In his book Modernity and the Holocaust Jewish historian Zygmunt Baumann (who died recently) claimed that among the conditions that made the mass extermination of the Jews possible, the most decisive factor was that of modernity itself. For modern civilization, in its inexorable pursuit of economic progress, sets up an order which privileges only certain sections of the population and treats the rest as expendable. In the C20th Europe, the religiously rooted mythology of anti-semitism meant that the ‘expendable’ population became the Jews. Baumann returns to this theme in another book of his which I’m reading now called Wasted Lives: Modernity and its Outcasts. He shows how modernity’s global triumph intensifies the process of creating certain people as superfluous or redundant. Their role then becomes to serve as a focus for new political anxieties and security fears: categories of people, like immigrants, asylum seekers, benefit dependents, or tribal people getting in the way of progress, are treated as a form of human waste.

But this trashing of populations and people which modernity generates can be seen as incompatible the central command of Hebrew scriptures, which enjoins us to treat the life of fellow humans as holy: You shall be holy for I am holy (Lev.11.44). Perhaps Esther’s mission to save a threatened people has in our own time been extended.

Angela West

‘Face to Faith’ Art Exhibition by Russell Haines – Gloucester Cathedral

After seeing a wonderful copy of a painting of Rabbi Anna, in the J.C. announcing an Art Exhibition on Faith by artist Russell Haines, at the Cloisters in Gloucester Cathedral, I went along to view the whole exhibition.

The Cathedral itself is a most beautiful building with a wonderful atmosphere and a lovely service was just finishing as I went through to the Cloisters.  The exhibition consisted of 37 wonderful huge paintings of people who held different beliefs.  Alongside each of the paintings was the text explaining what the person’s faith meant to them. The quality of each painting was exceptional and the artist was truly inspired and gifted, and I found the whole exhibition very moving.

On looking at the background of the artist later, I was amazed that he had only been painting a few years and had taken up art as a therapy to help his recovery after having a severe stroke.  He found he was unable to continue his main work as a builder and electrician and gradually had to start from scratch to rebuild his life and pick up the threads again.

This is an artist to look out for in the future.  I understand that he wishes to take this exhibition around the UK and abroad and hopes to continue the whole project with the theme of ‘Hope’ and then ‘Charity’.

For me it was so uplifting to read of Russell’s own life journey and the courage it must have taken to keep going and face such huge challenges and find what a wonderful creative gift he had to share as he recovered. It is so uplifting that he has found a way to inspire others who are challenged and not give up.

In terms of the exhibition, the message it contains for me is to be respectful of each person’s belief and let’s learn to live in harmony and peace together.  

As for Russell’s work – the perception and heart he put into each painting was truly exceptional and I feel privileged to have had the opportunity to view the whole exhibition.  

Shirley G

Face to Faith Exhibition – further comment

gloucesterpic

Cherry and I went to this exhibition on a grey Saturday afternoon, having been told about it by Shirley Goldstein. It was certainly a stunning exhibition, set up along three sides of the cathedral cloisters and consisting of 37 larger-than-life sized portraits of leaders and members of different faiths. These included everything you could imagine from Rasta to Wicca to Runic to atheist, in addition to all the major world religions, with all of the individuals portrayed, living in or near Gloucester. The painting of Rabbi Anna Gerard, near the start of the exhibition, was very impressive and her writing as always, was moving and inspiring.

The paintings, in acrylic/oils are bold, bright, colourful, in your face with lots of primary colours as well as pieces of text woven into the fabric of the painting. It seems like a very bold step for such a wide-ranging exhibition to be mounted in the cathedral and indeed it has not been without local controversy with vandalism and attacks on the cathedral website resulting from the Islamic call to Prayer being recited at the initial exhibition launch. You can see more details of this at:

http://www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk/organisers-hit-out-at-inappropriate-claims-after-muslim-call-to-prayer-at-gloucester-cathedral/story-30065568-detail/story.html

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/feb/12/vandals-artworks-gloucester-cathedral-religions-death-threats

I hope, that as Shirley Goldstein points out, this exhibition can have a successful tour in other locations, and we are thankful to Gloucester Cathedral and Rev. Ruth Fitter who helped organise the exhibition.

Julian Brown

Book Review

Author: Dr Anne Summers
Title: Christian and Jewish women in Britain, 1880-1940 : living with difference.
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
Cost: hardcover £66.99; ebook £52.99; Chapters available from £23.94

Special offer – 20% discount on printed book or eBook using the token on palgrave.com PM1&TWENTY, valid until 05/06/2017.

HJCSummers

This is a series of vignettes of mainly Christian and Jewish women, their friendships, political campaigning and social works. Lily Montagu and Netta Franklin each have a chapter, so there is much of Liberal Jewish interest. It is very well-researched, each short chapter has pages of references. Miss Lily’s close ties with Margaret McDonald are explored and Netta’ close friendship with Charlotte Mason. Interfaith initiatives in the 1880s and 1890s in Salford and Manchester come from a wish to help poor women in entirely practical ways, such as the provision of soap, nurses and holidays for children. As on the Continent, there was co-operation between Jews and Christians to combat the social evil of prostitution, by appointing a dock agent to meet new arrivals and take them to safe suitable accommodation. Jews were seen as Honorary Protestants in some cases and invited on committees where Catholics were not. Constance Flower was an important bridge between the two groups, as she was born a Rothschild.

Dr Summers reckons it was these good relations that led to so much help from non-Jews for refugees from Nazism, in particular from Quakers, the National Council of Women and Save the Children among many other groups.

This is followed by chapters on Rebecca Sieff on English women and Zionism and finally on the very current topics of refuge and asylum. She concludes that in England there was a culture of decency interwoven with the ambiguities which bedevil all private and public relationships. The culture of wishing for neighbourliness and understanding must be embraced by senior clergy of Christianity, Islam and Judaism, not just a moderate liberal few individuals.
This is a very timely study for today, well written and very widely researched. I recommend this to all synagogue libraries, but the price is unfortunately high for many people. Light is thrown on many small groups, such as the Jewish Peace Society of 1914 and COPEC the Conference on Politics, Economics and Citizenship in 1924. This is an important contribution to our understanding of Britain in the late 19th century and up to the interwar years. Very readable and welcome as a contribution to the history of multiculturalism in Britain.

Alison Turner

Book review – East-West Street

Phillipe Sands, Penguin Random House

HJCeastwest

This is not a book for the faint hearted, dealing as it does with the origins of the crimes of Genocide, and Crimes against Humanity which were first established at the Nuremburg trials in 1945. However, it is also not too difficult a read, as it is also the personal story of the family history of the author, himself an expert in International Law. It traces the personal histories of the two eminent Law experts who first drafted the definition of these crimes, Hersche Lauterpacht and Raphael Lemkin, and also follows that of Hans Frank, the German Governor of Occupied Poland, and Hitler’s legal expert, who was one of those tried in Nuremburg, and whose son came to be a friend of the author while he was researching this book. This a very well researched account of middle Europe in the years leading up to 1939 and subsequent events during the war and in its immediate aftermath. I found this book fascinating, but at the same time, it is very much a factual narrative, as you may expect from a lawyer, but for me, it was sometimes lacking in emotion.

For more information, See: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/may/22/east-west-street-origin-genocide-crimes-against-humanity-philippe-sands-review

JB

KlezNorth 2017

HJCKleznorth

This is an opportunity to indulge yourself in Klezmer music, dance, and song. Only for Klezmer fanatics but a lot of fun, especially if it coincides with Purim, as this year. The event is held in the attractive village of Youlgrave in Derbyshire, with main activities taking place in the village hall, and workshops held in other locations throughout the village. You don’t have to be an instrumentalist, or even a singer to attend KlezNorth, but you do need to be prepared to participate, including helping with some of the practical/domestic tasks needing to be done over the weekend. Workshops on Yiddish Song, late night klezmer dancing and a wonderful Yiddish workshop/Purimspiel, at which we did yet another ludicrous re- enactment of the Purim story, were some of the highlights of the event. Catering was excellent, and accommodation is in the local Youth Hostel or local B&B’s. Recommended.

Julian & Cherry

Pesach K’neidlach Recipe (matzo balls)

I have tried various kneidle recipes and generally not got the nice fluffy texture that I was aiming for. However, this recipe I have found to be foolproof and comes from Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi’s Jerusalem cookbook.

HJCKneidlach

Perfect Kneidlach (makes 12-15)

2 large eggs

40g margarine or chicken fat, melted and allowed to cool a bit

2 tbsp finely chopped parsley

75g matzo meal

4 tbsp soda water

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Whisk the eggs until frothy then whisk in the melted fat. Add ½ a teaspoon of salt, some black pepper and the parsley. Gradually stir in the matzo meal followed by the soda water and stir to a uniform paste. Cover the bowl and chill until cold and firm, at least an hour or two and up to a day ahead.

Line a baking sheet with cling film. Using your wet hands and a spoon, shape the batter into balls the size of small walnuts and place on the baking sheet

Drop the matzo balls into a large pot of boiling salted water. Cover partially with a lid and reduce the heat to low. Simmer gently until tender, about 30 minutes.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the kneidlach to a clean baking sheet to cool and then be chilled for up to a day, or they can go straight into the soup. Another option is to freeze them.

Cherry Wolfe

Members Welfare

Judith Labelter:

Some of you will have seen Judith Labelter at the last service and know that she is much improved, and now back at home, but still needs to improve further, and build up her strength. We wish her well for the future.

Pre-Pesach Story

Herschele Ostropolye is a Jewish wise guy who lived in the 18th Century near Mezhbizh in Southern Ukraine.

Here is a sample story relating to Pesach.

Herschele had a stall in the market where he was selling bric a brac including one item which was a large blank canvas. A passer-by came up and asked Herschele what sort of a painting it was. Herschele replied ‘If you give me a shekel, I’ll tell you all about it’. The curious punter paid over his shekel, and Herschele told him it was a famous painting of the Jews being chased by the Egyptians across the Red Sea.

So’, says the punter, ‘Where are the Jews?’

Oh, they’ve crossed already’

And where are the Egyptians?’

Oh, they haven’t come yet’.

The punter, now feeling really exasperated continues:

Nu, and where is the Red Sea?’

It’s parted.’

Courtesy of Wikipedia

Forthcoming Events
Our next HJC community meeting will be the Pesach Seder at Saxon Hall, Hereford on 13th April. Bookings are now closed, but contact Cherry Wolfe for any queries about this event.

AGM As last year, this will be a social event where we can relax in more comfortable surroundings and take the opportunity to review the community activities of the past year, and look at where we are going as a community.

AGM Sunday 7th May, Trumpet Inn, Ledbury, 1130 – 1230 followed by Social lunch. Please give in your menu choices on arrival.

Anne Frank Interfaith Service – Saturday 10th June 2017, Saxon Hall Hereford. We are hoping to have representatives of other faiths and local organisations present at this service which will be led this year by Rabbi Anna Gerrard.

Friday 28th April Interfaith Coffee morning, cakes, plant sale, raffle 10 – 12 Forbury Chapel , Leominster HR6 8NH

Herefordshire Interfaith Group

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 May 2017

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general, contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 words, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 500KB for newsletter inclusion. All contributions are welcome but depending on format and content, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Wed 12th April Passover Seder meal 6.30 p.m. Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford, HR2 6HE
Sunday 7th May AGM at Trumpet Inn, followed by Social lunch 11.30 a.m. Trumpet Inn, Ledbury, Ledbury Rd, Trumpet HR8 2RA
Saturday 27th May Shavuoth Shared Service with GLJC 11 a.m. Up Hatherley Village Hall Shiloh, Swindon Lane, Cheltenham GL51 9QG
Saturday 10th June Ann Frank service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard – open to other faiths 11 a.m. Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford, HR2 6HE
Sunday 18th June Film Session – Ushpezin, and Tea 4 p.m. Belmont Community Centre, Eastholme Avenue, Hereford HR2 7UQ
Friday 28th April HIFG Interfaith Coffee morning, cakes, plant sale, raffle 10 – 12 Forbury Chapel , Leominster HR6 8NH

 

Herefordshire Jewish Community Contacts

Email hjc@liberaljudaism.org Mark Walton

Tel: 01594 530721 (after 6pm or at weekends)

 

   
   
 

Denial – the film in Hereford and Alone in Berlin in Hereford and Malvern

denial001-web-badged

Borderlines film festival runs from Friday 24 February to Saturday 12 March and has more than one film of Jewish interest. The first one that captured our attention is Denial which will be at the Courtyard in Hereford. Directed by Mick Jackson and starring Rachel Weisz, Timothy Spall, Andrew Scott, Tom Wilkinson, it was made in the UK and USA in 2016, and is 1 hour 50 minutes long, with a 12A film certificate.

Jewish American historian Deborah Lipstadt’s compelling story of the 1996 libel case against her brought by notorious Holocaust denier David Irving is adapted by David Hare. Denial is powered by performance; Spall’s Irving is a poisonous mix of insecurity and bravado, a man blinded by his own prejudice and amplified by bluster, while Weisz gives a nuanced turn as the impassioned Lipstadt, who finds herself representing an entire people in her quest to prove the truth. It’s an essential tale for our ‘post-fact’ times – with parallels to Brexit politics and Donald Trump’s mendacious presidential campaign – documenting a necessary triumph of truth, reason and forensic fact over ignorance and prejudice.

Fri 24 February 11:00am
Sat 25 February 2:15pm
Sun 26 February 5:00pm
Mon 27 February 11:00am
Tue 28 February 5:15pm

Another film that caught my attention is Alone in Berlin, directed by  Vincent Perez and starring: Emma Thompson, Brendan Gleeson, Daniel Brühl

Germany/France/UK, 2016, 1 hour 43 minutes

aloneinBerlin001_web_badged

Emma Thompson and Brendan Gleeson give committed, insightful performances in Vincent Perez’s (Once Upon an Angel) adaptation of Hans Fallada’s 1947 novel, based on the true story of a husband and wife who became part of the German Resistance during WWII. Thompson and Gleeson are Anna and Otto Quangel, living in 1940s Berlin. Their grief and despair at a war tragedy turns them into unlikely agitators, denouncing Hitler in a series of subversive postcards strewn across the city. Hotly pursued by Gestapo detective Escherich (Daniel Brühl) and under threat from anyone who sees them, they live out a bleak and terrifying existence. Fallada’s chilling masterpiece was one of the first anti-Nazi novels published by a German after the war and shows how ordinary citizens subsumed the reign of the Third Reich – with its intimate terror, violence, treachery and censorship – into their everyday consciousness; ideas well served by Perez’s handsome and very moving adaptation.

Fri 24 February 5:00pm
Sun 26 February 11:30am
Thu 2 March 7:45pm

The screening on Sunday 26 February has SOLD OUT, just a few tickets remaining for Friday 24 screening at The Courtyard Hereford.

HJC Newsletter October/November 2016

Editorial

I had planned to have this newsletter ready for Rosh Hashanah, but planning for Rosh Hashanah evening took over, so we are now in the period of reflection between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Certainly there is plenty to reflect on, within ourselves, within our own community, and with the wider world in which we live. Our readings on Rosh Hashanah also made us think there are many different perspectives on how we do this, so each of us has to find the way that suits us.

Some of us also attended the Rosh Hashanah morning service in Gloucester, which was Rabbi Anna Gerard’s first official duty following her period of leave. She spoke again about the Binding of Isaac – a challenge of all challenges, so I guess we all have to think how far we are prepared to go for our beliefs and principles.

Wishing everyone in the community G’mar Chatimah Tovah – Happy New Year.

In this edition:

Chair Chat Hereford Peace Service JMI Yiddish Summer school. Ladies who lunch. Charity Update. New year message from Charles Clore Centre. Hebrew groups.

CHAIR CHAT

Saturday September 10

We were very grateful to Rabbi Michael Standfield for leading our service on September 10.   He was very interesting, particularly about his time as a rabbi in Johannesburg and Durban, and it was also nice for him to meet up with Rosalie and Michelle, his former congregants from Middlesex New.    Many thanks also to Rabbi Danny Rich for arranging his “stand in” at very short notice.   Another new venue for us at Ledbury Community Centre – quite convenient but too big for our current needs.

 

Preparation for Rosh Hashanah

 As Rabbi Michael reminded us, the period before Rosh Hashanah is a time to seek reconciliation.   I am not sure that Joey Barton, the controversial and outspoken footballer and part time philosopher, has entirely got the message about apologies.   After withdrawing an unreserved apology to one of his team mates for an altercation, he tweeted, Apologising doesn’t always mean that you’re wrong and the other person is right. It means you value your relationship more than your ego.”

Rosh Hashanah Supper

The answer to encouraging people to come out on Erev Rosh Hashanah is obviously food.  We had a record attendance of 25 people at the Burgage Hall in Ledbury.  Julian and Cherry led an evening of readings, stories and songs to welcome the New Year and to explore its meaning.  This was a very thoughtful, innovative and inclusive approach, the highlight of which was the traditional blowing of the shofar.   The wonderful buffet laid on by Cherry with her team of willing helpers was a magnificent spread with a particularly impressive array of cakes.  As a community, we are extremely fortunate to have people like Julian and Cherry in our midst.  They worked tirelessly to make the evening such a success, ensuring that everyone was involved, well fed and included.

Peace Day Service – Herefordshire Interfaith group – 25th of September 2016

The second Interfaith Peace Day service to be held in Hereford Cathedral, was a moving event at which a large number of faiths were represented, including Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, Baha’i, Quaker, and Christian. After an introduction by the Chancellor of Hereford Cathedral, there was a candle lighting ceremony for all the faiths, and we were then honoured to be the first event in the programme. Six members of HJC – Mark, Rosalie, Eva, Alison, Cherry and Julian joined in with singing Od Yavo Shalom Aleynu, which was led by Cherry Wolfe, and accompanied by guitar. We received very positive feedback from other participants in the service, so we must have been doing something right. One of the other very powerful contributions to the service was a ‘Qirat’, a Muslim chanting of a passage from the Koran, which had a style and tone not so different from that of a traditional Chazzan. There was also some fine singing and chants by the Interfaith choir, as well as a rather unexpected song from a Christian musical which had been performed in Belfast. Mark and Julian also read Psalm 23 in Hebrew which was then sung together in English by the congregation.

After the service we were served with local apple juice, and had chance to meet with other participants and those attending the service, which was very enjoyable, as we always find we have more in common than differences on these occasions.

This is a worthwhile event which I hope can be more widely supported in future and also include those not necessarily so directly involved in faith groups.

We are very grateful to Vanessa Pomeroy who took photographs of the service, two of which are included here.

Julian Brown

Ot Azoy Yiddish Course

In August, Cherry Wolfe attended a Yiddish summer schools at SOAS in London, run by JMI (Jewish music Institute). We recorded an interview with her about the course.

Why did you decide to go on a Yiddish course?

When I was growing up my parents sometimes spoke Yiddish, or bits of Yiddish at times when they didn’t want I or my brother to understand what they said. The sense of that Yiddish around me is still with me, and I want to explore my connection with it and with my ancestors and their stories and where they come from.

When did the course run and how was organised how long did it last?

It’s a summer course which is like a crash course for one week. It happens every summer in London and there were also Yiddish courses in other cities around the world but the one in London runs at SOAS, the school of African and Oriental studies near King’s Cross.

What was your overall experience of the course?

The students were diverse and came from a variety of different backgrounds. They weren‘t all Jewish: there were some who came from a mainly academic background, or those who had other kinds of interest, for example there was a young Polish woman I met, a young woman who originally came from Latvia and lived in the States, and an academic woman whose area was Slavic languages, and felt that Yiddish had an important place in that. The teaching was excellent, and I enjoyed the classes thoroughly.

Would you say you need to have a background in Hebrew or that having a background in Hebrew helps with learning Yiddish?

It would help but is not essential, though it is harder when you start without any background in the Hebrew alphabet which is what Yiddish is written in.

Was it primarily language or did you do music or other aspects of Yiddish culture?

It‘s a very intense week and very full. We do language in the morning: written language, spoken language, and we did homework and conversation in the afternoon. We have two music sessions for those who want to join those: song repertoire session after lunch for an hour, and then later in the afternoon there‘s Yiddish choir. There were film sessions about Yiddish film although I didn‘t go to any of these, as I chose to go to Yiddish choir. There are evening talks which are also very interesting, about different aspects of Yiddish culture and its historical context, covering the last 150 years approximately.

I‘m told you went on a walk in the East End?

That wasn‘t strictly a part of the course but it was connected, and it was an antifascist tour of the East End street, along Cable Street and parts of the East End where Mosley had tried to march in 1936.

Can you say anything about the way the course was organised and put together?

I thought it was very well put together. I felt I learnt a lot in the week, and I could have done with a month really, and all the staff were very helpful. It was very busy and quite tiring, but very well organised.

Would you recommend the course to others?

Absolutely I enjoyed it thoroughly, and I know many people who go year after year, and there is also the song school which is happening at the same time, which we join in some sessions with, but they are studying song repertoire for the whole week.

What did you do about accommodation the course?

One of the possible options for accommodation is that there are some SOAS halls of residence very near to where the course is taking place, and I stayed there for the course of the week.

Thank you very much telling us about JMI‘s Yiddish Course.

Ot Azoy: Details from JMI: https://www.jmi.org.uk/event/ot-azoy-2016/

Obituary – Ralph Eskinazi

Ralph Eskinazi, who died at the beginning of September, and his wife Val, have long supported Herefordshire Jewish community and attended several of our services and events over the years. Since their move to Malvern some years back, Ralph and Val have also been welcome visitors at many of our Malvern Seders, either at our house or at the Grandi family house. Ralph has always had some interesting anecdote or contribution to make to the proceedings.

Ralph was a fascinating character. Born in Cairo, and brought up in Egypt, where he had a French Lycee education, he came to Britain at the age of 18. He began work as a draughtsman and subsequently had a career as a planning engineer.

He had an enthusiasm for many aspects of life, from being an expert backgammon player, to regular swimmer at Malvern Splash, to being a member of a Greek culture club. He was interested in many aspects of Judaism and Jewish life and culture. Ralph and Val were lifelong members and regular attenders of Birmingham Progressive synagogue after their marriage. Barry Roseman of Birmingham Progressive synagogue said of Ralph: “It was clear from the attendance at the funeral and the evening prayers, that in life Ralph touched many people as the two gatherings cut across any boundaries in our community as well as those from outside.”

In the last five years, Ralph was lucky enough to be able to spend time with his grandson.

We wish a long life to Ralph’s widow Val Eskinazi, his two sons, Simon and David and his two sisters.

Julian Brown

Angela West writes:

Ladies who lunch…in this case at the Estero Lounge in Monmouth, where we discussed the Daughters of Zelophehad, 

(Num.27,1-11) – five remarkable sisters who petitioned Moses concerning their inheritance rights, and got a change in the law from Sinai! We were considering this (and other stories of bible women) as possible topics for discussion at the Jewish Cultural Group that meets in Monmouth.

Hanna’s sister Gail was also with us and took the photo.   

Angela West

Hebrew Groups

Hebrew groups in Malvern and Monmouth are again up and running after the summer break. As well as preparing for Rosh Hashanah with prayers and songs, the Monmouth group also took on the task of translating some of the Torah text of the binding of Isaac. There’s a lot of knowledge in the group once we all share what we know.

JB

HJC High Holyday Charity Appeal

As a community HJC aims to raise at least £100 for each of our chosen charities, and this year we are hoping to raise even more, as we have an increasingly active community, and we have very worthwhile causes to support. Our chosen charities are the Charles Clore Centre, and Combat Stress.

Many of you have already given donations but if anyone else would like to contribute, please send donations to our Treasurer, Alison Turner. Cheques payable to Herefordshire Jewish Community.

We are delighted to say that, following our Rosh Hashanah evening, we have already raised £300, a record for our Community, so thank you to everyone for your generosity.

Members Welfare

We wish health and recovery to Judith Labelter who is currently housebound with mobility problems.

 Picture Quiz

No picture quiz this month, but if you would like to feature in the next edition let us know. Last edition pictures were of course of Rosalie Tobe.

New Year message from Mohamed Fahili, Charles Clore Community Centre

What brings us hope in this upcoming year? 

      25 youths gaining life-skills for their national service
32 children enhancing their focus through Karate
35 women empowered to find employment
42 ballet dancers synchronising their steps
43 children expressing themselves through art
54 young musicians connecting through notes not words
60 pre-schoolers transitioning with confidence into school
60 new learners discovering the power of English words
68 children playing and laughing at our 3 daycare facilities

Hundreds of visitors celebrating Shared Society in action.

This is The Meeting Place

Our Meeting Place. Your Meeting Place.
 A place for all – Christian, Jew and Muslim.
A place to find hope and cherish it.

      We thank you for your ongoing support which has helped us become what we are today. Our Centre is doing so much for so many beautiful Arab and Jewish children in and around Akko. And the vision doesn’t end here. There is still so much more we can do together.
Stand up and be counted.

We at The Sir Charles Clore Jewish Arab Community Centre all join in wishing you and all your friends and family a sweet New Year filled with hopes for a better world.

Mohammad Fahili – Director
Clare King Lassman

Sir Charles Clore Jewish-Arab Community Centre http://www.ajcenter.org.il

 

 

Forthcoming Events

UK International Jewish Film Festival, 5 – 20 November 2016

There is an exciting programme of films for this festival. Most showings are in a range of venues in London with occasional events in Manchester, Nottingham, Leeds and Glasgow. If you happen to be in London during this period, do try and catch something. Always well worthwhile.

Details at: http://ukjewishfilm.org/

High Holyday services

Yom Kippur services at Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish Community (GLJC). See details below.

 Kol Nidre 11th October 7.00pm at Up Hatherley Village Hall (UHVH), Cold Pool Lane, Cheltenham GL51 6JA

 Yom Kippur 12th October 11.00am – 7.30pm approx. at Friends Meeting House, Greyfriars, Gloucester, GL1 1TS. with Morning and Additional Service, Study or walk, Afternoon service,
Yizkor and Concluding Service then breaking the fast with a communal chavurah meal.

HJC Services

Our next service is the Simchat Torah service on Saturday 22nd October at Bridges Centre, led by Rabbi Anan Gerrard. This is always a most enjoyable and informative event, so please try to come along. Children especially welcome.

We are still waiting to hear of date and student Rabbi for our annual Lech Lecha service in November, but this is usually a most interesting service, so we hope you can join us. We will post information on Rabbi and location as soon as we know.

Hebrew groups

Monmouth – Tuesday 1st November 4 p.m. Bridges Centre.

Malvern – t.b.c.

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 November 2016

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 wds, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

Herefordshire Jewish Community Contacts

For all enquiries please email hjc@liberaljudaism.org  Or phone our Chair, Mark Walton 

on 01594 530721 after 6pm. 

 

 

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Saturday Oct 22nd Simchat Torah Service – led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard 11.00 a.m. Bridges Centre, Drybridge Park, Monmouth, NP25 5AS
Saturday 12th (5th/19th) November Lech Lecha Shabbat service led by student Rabbi 11.00 a.m. Colwall/Ledbury t.b.c.
Sunday 20th November Mitzvah Day t.b.c.

Other Events of Interest

Tuesday October 11th GLJC Kol Nidre Service 7 p.m. Up Hatherley Village Hall (UHVH), Cold Pool Lane, Cheltenham GL51 6JA
Wednesday, October 12th GLJC Yom Kippur Services, followed by breaking of Fast & meal. 11.00 a.m. (t.b.c.) – 7.30 p.m. Friends Meeting House, Greyfriars, Gloucester, GL1 1TS