HJC Newsletter February/March 2016 – Purim Edition

Editorial

Firstly, apologies for the lateness of this newsletter. Cherry and I both returned from a visit to Israel in January with a ‘flu bug which has taken us some time to recover from. The weather in Israel at this time of the year is not altogether Mediterranean! We include some comments on our trip in this newsletter, and it sounds as if we missed an interesting Shabbat service while we were away.

This edition contains a combination of more local news but also some from France and Israel. In Israel, while there are always negative actions by the Government, this past week sees the decision to create an egalitarian prayer space at the Western Wall, which is a brave move by Israel’s Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, and must be applauded. While this may not directly affect many of us here, it is a significant step forward in inclusiveness, which has not been without its strong critics within the Israeli Government. As Liberal Jews we need to support any moves to more openness and acceptance of different perspectives, both religious and cultural, in the Middle East and also here in Herefordshire with our interfaith work – See details of events in calendar.

Julian Brown

In this edition: Chair Chat        Jerusalem Round up          Burns night in Jerusalem

                         Interfaith story          Community Matters                 Hebrew Learning

CHAIR CHAT JANUARY 2016

1. RABBI ANNA

As usual, Anna came up with something different and entertaining for our Chanukah party. This time it was a competition to construct a menorah from the materials provided. Quite a challenge for the butter fingered but great fun. 

Our last service with Anna before she begins her adoption leave was on January 23 at Colwall. We had a good attendance on a cold day and an interesting discussion on the nature of prayer, particularly in the light of the proposed new LJ prayer book. Anna told us that she is shortly to adopt Josh (5 years old) and we look forward to welcoming him to our services in the future. We wish her all the best of luck with this exciting challenge and look forward to welcoming her back in September.

2. FUTURE SERVICES

While Anna is on leave, we have arranged for some visiting Rabbis to take our services. On Saturday February 27, our old friend, Rabbi Margaret Jacobi from Birmingham, will be leading the service at Colwall. On Friday March 11, Rabbi Alexandra Wright, the senior Rabbi at the Liberal Jewish Synagogue in London, will take our Friday night service at Saxon Hall in Hereford. Many thanks to Gloucestershire Jewish Community and the LJS for facilitating this. Apparently, Alexandra is going to cycle between Hereford and Gloucester to take the Saturday morning service there – we shall see! Finally, we are honoured that the President of Liberal Judaism, Rabbi Andrew Goldstein, will take our service at Saxon Hall on Saturday June 11, to mark Anne Frank Day and a year since we planted the tree in front of the centre. It will also be erev Shavuot and Andrew has offered an additional study session.

3. SHUL CRAWL – YORK

I have a strong affinity with York, having spent over 6 years as a student there where I met Mary and got married, and my mother in law and brother in law have now settled there. I noted the recent growth of a new liberal Jewish group there with interest and on my last visit to the city managed to attend a service. They meet in the Friends Meeting House in the shadow of Cliffords Tower, notorious for the massacre of Jews in 1190. I was immediately struck by the vitality and inclusivity of the community. There were over 30 people at the service but I was told there are normally more than 50. The service was led by a very lively and charismatic student Rabbi, Daniel Lichman, who obviously had a great rapport with the community. With many children in the community, they are able to run a cheder and also have regular Hebrew lessons before the service (a model for us?). It was a great pleasure for me to meet there Josephine Woolfson, one of our founder members, who frequently comes over from Leeds to support her York based daughter. I can’t comment on the quality of the kiddush or the chavurah lunch they were having after the service as I had no time to stay but it looked and smelt good! I will certainly go again next time I am in York.

4. TEA ROTA

As our Council is now severely depleted, offers to make (and wash up) tea and coffee at services would be gratefully received. This would include bringing fresh milk to the service. Please let Julian, Cherry, Alison or myself know if you are willing to help on a rota basis. It will be one less thing we have to worry about!

5. IS SANTA JEWISH?

Totally unseasonal, I know, but glancing through December copies of the JC (courtesy of David L.). I chanced on the following.
Given the JC’s penchant for trying to establish Jewish lineage for celebrities such as Kate Middleton, David Beckham, Ben Cohen (rugby player) or George Cohen (footballer),  a letter offered 10 reasons why Santa is really Jewish.
“He wears a funny beard and hat.  Is always overdressed. Like traditions.  Is the centre of attention.  Loves kids.  Is his own boss – and has a lot of personnel.
Has a great sense of humour.  Is a regular at Brent Cross.  A self made career.  Always prefers reindeers over a car on Shabbat.  Obviously this can only mean one thing …Le’chaim Santa.”

Mark Walton

Jerusalem Round up

Whenever I return from a visit to Jerusalem, I feel that the sheer variety of backgrounds – cultural, architectural, social and religious, is probably unique in such a small city. In how many cities can you go from a narrow streeted world of Charedi Jews living in such a cloistered environment, where even normal Western dress feels very out of place, and then within no more than 10 minutes’ walk in another direction, you find yourself almost in another country, where women are dressed in black from head to toe, yet go about their business perfectly normally, where Palestinian men drink Turkish coffee, and Arabic instead of Yiddish is the norm? Here, over what was once the Green line between East and West Jerusalem, there is an educational bookshop crammed full of scholarly works, all exploring the Israeli-Palestinian situation, from the Palestinian side. Back in the Bokharan quarter (one of many ultra-religious areas of the city) even any references to modern day society or culture feels out of place, as everything turns around religious law, ritual and custom.

On a fairly sunny morning on our first day in Jerusalem, we sat in a café in the main Machaneh Yehudah market (shuk) talking to a young man in his mid thirties. He had grown up in the Charedi community in B’nei Barak, but from his mid-teens somehow felt this was not right for him, and eventually he left the community, which is no small step to take if you are Charedi.. Amazingly, he is still on good terms with his parents, telling us they are more open and tolerant than many Charedi. While he is still religious, his wife, who also grew up Charedi, has given up all her religious beliefs, and is now a campaigning photographer and film maker, and has made a powerful film called the Black Bus about the religious segregation in Jerusalem, for which you can see trailer on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CeIcuOuxQoI

Machaneh Yehudah is always an amazingly positive experience, with its myriad smells, colours, and stalls piled high with every fruit and, vegetable, cheeses and olives, fish, meat and breads of every shape and size. Only here can you meet a man who runs a small stall selling Etrog juice which he claims is the health drink par excellence.

A Jerusalem Burns night

Being only Yorkshire born, although having lived two years in Scotland, and been married for twenty-five years to a Glasgow born Scot, I felt privileged to be invited to participate in a Jerusalem Burns night, organised by Cherry’s brother. For anyone who does not know, Burns night is an annual occasion to celebrate the life and poetry of Rabbie Burns who wrote much of his verse in Lallans (lowland Scots). Being in Jerusalem, this Burns night had to cater for a range of ethnic backgrounds (although with a strong Scottish bias), and also included a multitude of languages. Lallans was translated into both Hebrew and Arabic. Auld Lang Syne was translated into Yiddish, and also bagpipes were very professionally played by an Israeli born member of the Embassy staff.

Cherry’s father was a Burns lover and to that end, her brother Lenny began hosting Burns’ nights, which he has now done for about 15 years, continuing the tradition after her father died in 2006. This Burns night was a great opportunity, although also slightly nerve wracking, for both Cherry and I to perform in front of 60 people. Cherry sang ‘Ye Banks and Braes, and I told a traditional Scottish story, with both being very well received. The evening also included Ode to a Haggis (vegetarian, of course), Glasgow street songs, and an address to the Lassies and the Laddies.

Living in Jerusalem, the atmosphere can be quite tough, especially as now, when there is an intifada in place, so a Burns night is an opportunity to drink deeply of the spirit of Rabbie Burns and also of the liquid spirits which hail from the peaty Highlands and Islands of Scotland.

Hebrew Survey

We have had a fair amount of interest in learning Hebrew within the community (though we would be grateful if any more members wish to return their surveys). It looks as if we may need to set up small groups in both Monmouth and Malvern areas, but as always it is the geographical logistics which is going to be the determining factor to making this all happen. We have a range of possible resources, and the next step is to set up initial meetings, where we can gauge more accurately the level of Hebrew knowledge of those members interested, and explore next steps for learning.

Community Matters – Farewell to Andrea

Andrea Berry-Ottaway, who has been such a constant member, and for many years the mainstay of our community, is finally leaving Herefordshire for Banbury on 7 March to be closer to her family. So our last chance to see her before her move will be at our next service on 27 February. I am sure we all wish her the best of health and many happy years to come in her new home.

 

Interfaith News – Rabbi meets Rapper

A story in the I newspaper on Saturday reported on the unusual pairing of a Rabbi and a black Muslim rapper teaming up to create a youTube music video against anti-semitism. Rabbi Michel Serfaty, from the southern suburbs of Paris, a founder of the Muslim –Jewish friendship association, visited the rapper, Coco Tkt, (pronounced t’inquiete) in prison, where he was serving a sentence for armed robbery. Whilst in prison, Coco Tkt had had a change of heart from his previous links with the anti-Semitic comedian, Dieudonne, and decided he wished to do something to try to combat anti semitic sentiment in Paris.

 

Book Review – Hebrew Talk

Whilst at the South West Regional Shabbaton in November, we bought a book on behalf of HJC, which hopefully can be loaned out to those members most interested.

This is a very accessible, fascinating and readable book, subtitled 101 Hebrew Roots and the Stories they tell, written by Joseph Lowin. Each short chapter gives a lightning tour of words and meanings, associated with the simple three letter root, not only in Hebrew, but with occasional shifts into other cultures and languages. The root (gimmel, daled, lamed) for example (Gadol) has a whole range of meanings associated with being big, great, strong and the stories told link with Biblical sources, Jewish history and modern Israeli society. Reading this book is a relatively painless way of absorbing the finer detail of Hebrew etymology, and gaining a basic knowledge of many of the key roots and words in the Hebrew language.

 

Hereford & Malvern Foodbanks

Please bring your donations to the next HJC Service. For details see below.

Malvern Foodbank provide emergency food for local people in crisis.

They are collecting donations of the following to help local people in crisis. If you can help, one or more items from the list will make a real difference.

They particularly need:

Coffee, tinned fish, tinned fruit, instant mash potato, jam, marmalade, tinned meat, UHT milk, pasta sauces, tinned sponge puddings, 500g bags of sugar, tinned tomatoes, treats, tinned vegetables.

Please note they cannot accept frozen, chilled or perishable items.

They also need the following non-food items:

Bleach, cleaning cloths, deodorant, shower gel, toilet rolls, washing powder.

Thank you for any help you can give the foodbank.

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 March 2016

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 words, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Saturday 27th February

Shabbat service led by Rabbi Margaret Jacobi

11.a.m.

Ale House Colwall

Friday 11th March

Friday Evening Service led by Rabbi Alexandra Wright

7 p.m. 

Burgage Hall, Ledbury

Sunday 24 April

HJC Communal Seder

6.30 p.m.

Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford, HR2 6HE

Saturday 11th June

Anne Frank Day Service led by Rabbi Andrew Goldstein

t.b.c.

Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford, HR2 6HE

Other Events of Interest

Saturday 5th March

Herefordshire Interfaith Women’s Day

9.30 – 4.00

Kindle Centre Belmont Road, Hereford HR2 7JE

Thursday 10th March

Herefordshire Interfaith Group AGM

7p.m. –

9 p.m.

Kindle Centre Belmont Road, Hereford HR2 7JE

 

Other Events of Interest
Yachad and New Israel Fund UK are hosting a
Security Conference next month to look at the current position n Israel..
Security might be the most used term in Israeli political life – and in our conversations about Israel in the community. As two organisations committed to building a safe and secure Israel, we have invited an outstanding team of experts to help us unpack what security really means today.
We will be tackling the burning questions of how to approach Israel’s security in 2016, including: What are the greatest strategic threats currently facing the State of Israel? Is there a dichotomy between peace and security? Who are the potential Palestinian partners for peace?
When: Sunday 6th March, 09:15-16:45
Where: Cavendish Conference Rooms, 22 Duchess Mews, London W1G 9DT
Tickets: £20 adults/£10 students

Herefordshire Interfaith Group

are launching a Faith to Faith Women to Women’s project.

To be held on March 5th, celebrating International Women’s Day.

You are invited to an informal relaxed day, sharing food and interests, through the medium of Art, Craft, Music and Dance. Individual cards and gifts will be made to send to ‘friends and loved ones’ to maintain and create bonds among women of Faith including those who live their lives in friendship and openness. (Crafting packets provided)

The Group wish to reach out to women of Faith and Spirituality from around the World who have made their homes in Herefordshire and surrounding Borders. The intention is to provide a platform for a better understanding of different cultures in order to enable women of diverse Faiths to help, support, guide and encourage other women, leading to friendships and minimising the feelings of isolation that may be felt when settling into a New Country.

Through these links we plan to make contact with their relatives and friends left behind in their home countries, in order that we may start to understand their cultures and what forms the basis of their understanding of faith, spirituality and friendships.

It is envisaged that in this way a web will spread out to many cultures throughout the world where we, in the main have little understanding, such as Afghanistan and Syria regarding Islam and Baha’i faiths, across Eastern Europe and into Bulgaria, regarding forms of Islam and Catholicism and pockets across the Himalayas and into Myanmar regarding different forms of Buddhism.

The Idea was born from the passion of the Chairman, The Venerable Tenzin Choesang a Buddhist Nun. Venerable’s vast experience of travel, as a Business Woman and Nun have taken her to many places. She believes that friendships and understanding can be created using the Universal language of Art, Craft, Dance and Music thus crossing all barriers. Along her journey, she has made many friends and treasures gifts given to her that now adorn her Meditation Room.

Smiles, actions, kind words and good deeds

STRANGERS ARE FRIENDS THAT WE HAVE YET TO MEET

Come and MAKE IT HAPPEN

HJC Newsletter December 2015/January 2016 – Chanukah Edition

Editorial

We are in the middle of an exciting period for HJC with 4 different events taking place over 4 weeks that members of HJC are involved in, so we are definitely alive, well, and kicking. We began with the ‘educational’ service on 21st November led by Cherry and myself, which was followed by the South West Regional Shabbaton for small communities on 28th November and on 5th December, HJC had a good sized table at the LKQ concert in Monmouth. Finally we are looking forward to seeing members, both old and new at our Chanukah service and party on 12 December in Hereford, to be led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard. Hence this newsletter is slightly later than usual, as so much has been going on. We hope we can plan further events cultural, educational and social as well as services, and also show we are a community that cares about others around us through social action in whatever way we can.

This issue has a variety of reports from the recent South West Communities Shabbaton which was help in Swindon on 28th November. We are also looking forward to running some Hebrew learning sessions in the new year, and there is also information on how we might help refugees.

Julian Brown

In this edition: Chair Chat Shabbaton Report London Klezmer Quartet Concert Community Matters Refugee Matters Hebrew Learning

CHAIR CHAT

Shabbat Services

We were delighted to welcome student Rabbi Igor Zinkov to lead our service on Shabbat Lech Lecha on Saturday October 24.   Igor had obviously put a lot of thought into the service and gave us a lot to think about as well.   It was also good to learn some new tunes, including a lively Yiddish version of “Adon Alom”.   We were all fascinated  to hear Igor talk about Jewish life in Russia during our communal lunch.    It’s always a pleasure to meet new student Rabbis and a great opportunity for us to have someone new to lead our service.   Many thanks to Igor for making the effort to come up from London and to Liberal Judaism for its support.

Many thanks, too, to Julian and Cherry for leading our service on Saturday November 21. This was designed to be a learning service and, as such, Julian explained the different aspects of the service. We also took time to exploring the Torah portion in more detail than usual, giving us chance to look at the Hebrew and intricacies of sentences. We were also introduced to some new melodies by Cherry, and the service included additional prayers for International Understanding.

Jewish Chronicle

I always enjoy reading the past copies of the JC that Judith and David kindly bring to the services. There were a couple of items in the copy of November 6 that caught my attention. On the front page was a story about a daring rescue mission to save the last Jewish family in war torn Aleppo who were smuggled out of their home earlier this year. After a 36 hour terrifying journey, during which they had to negotiate many armed checkpoints, they managed to reach the relatively safe haven of Turkey. The Jewish Agency then took responsibility for the family. The 88 year old mother, Mariam, and her daughter, Sara, were given safe haven in Israel. However, the Agency officials decided that another daughter, Gilda, her Muslim husband, Khaled, and their three children could not make Aliyah under the law of return and had no alternative but to go back to Syria where they remain. Apparently this is not an uncommon situation. A Syrian Jewish community leader living in America commented, that “Daesh would kill women if they found out they were born Jewish – regardless of whether they converted to marry Muslims.” Surely the Jewish Agency should reconsider and offer sanctuary to these unfortunate refugees?

On a more positive note, I was very impressed by the sterling work that Israeli aid agencies are doing in the Greek islands, helping to rescue refugees who have made the dangerous crossing by sea. They are very much in the front line there, taking part in regular patrols along the beaches and often plucking desperate men, women and children from the water.

I was also interested in a letter written by Rabbi Jonathan Romain (who always is worth reading) who stresses the importance of mixed faith schools, in particular the “only Jew in a non Jewish school” syndrome.

We have found there that there are four benefits:

  • first, to have a real live Jew in the class who looks and acts ordinary is the best way of preventing or countering any anti-Jewish stereotypes amongst their peers.

  • Second, each Jewish child automatically becomes an ambassador for Judaism, has to answer questions about Jewish life and is impelled to find answers.

  • Third, it reinforces their identity as Jews, they learn to live in two worlds and effortlessly move between them on a daily basis.

  • Fourth, it prepares them well for when they go off to university and find the ‘outside world’ easy to navigate rather than challenging or overwhelming.

A model both for a society at ease with minorities and for being a Jew within it.”

A powerful counterblast to the growing movement for faith schools which I feel is a very dangerous and regressive step for those of all religions and civil society.

Mark Walton

Update on Peace Day Service Sunday 20th September 2015, Hereford Cathedral

A full account of this service (which was reported in the last HJC newsletter) can be found at : https://phulme.wordpress.com/2015/09/21/peace-day-service-in-hereford-cathedral/

This has been written by Peter Hulme, the Baha’i representative.

An extract is given here:

Yesterday Hereford Cathedral hosted its first Peace Day Service to observe today’s International Day of Peace. The service was organised by the newly formed Herefordshire Interfaith Group.

The United Nations’ (UN) International Day of Peace is celebrated on September 21 each year to recognize the efforts of those who have worked hard to end conflict and promote peace. The International Day of Peace is also a day of ceasefire – personal or political. On this day, also known as Peace Day, people around the world take part in various activities and organize events centred on the theme “peace.” This was Hereford’s offering.

The Canon Chancellor of Hereford Cathedral & Venerable Tenzin Choesang welcomed everyone to the peace day service.

Peter Hulme

South West Shabbaton on November 28th 2015

at Jurys Inn, Swindon

Several HJC members went to this event, and some of their reports are included here. Feel free to read as much or as little as you wish.

It was the first time I’d been to a meeting like this – and I certainly found it most rewarding.

Amazing to see so many different groups represented – Gloucester, Swindon, Oxford, Wessex, Reading, Kent, Hereford , Bristol & West, Kingston, Crouch End – oh, and the six of us from Hereford ( plus Rabbi Anna who I suppose is partly ours!)

The first session I attended – guided chevrutah text study was somewhat different from my expectations – but nicely so! The focus was on Jewish identity – a theme reflected in a selection of texts, which we discussed with a partner. It was led by Rabbi Sandra Kviat and she took the opportunity to tell us how her own Danish Liberal-Jewish identity and rabbinic calling had come about – rather interesting to me, as I’ve lived in Denmark and am particularly aware of the unique role Denmark played in relation to its Jewish population during the Shoah.

After lunch, I was in Julian’s story-telling group, ‘From Chelm to Chasid’. I hadn’t realised till then that he has a whole alternative career as a story-teller! I have always deeply appreciated the Jewish midrash tradition of biblical interpretation, and no doubt the richness of Jewish story telling grows out of this – or perhaps it’s the other way round! When I got back, I shared the ‘Prophetic Squire’ Chasidic story with Roger – and he was very tickled by it.

The last session, where Rita Adler, R.Lea Muehlstein, Tony Samuel & Danny Rich spoke movingly of their experiences of working with refugee communities, impressed me very much. Danny referred more than once to what a small group of committed people can achieve and the testimony of this team certainly bore that out. Having worked with a colleague for many years with refugee and migrant women in Newport, I am also keenly aware of the obstacles and possibilities for discouragement, so I felt their achievement was all the more remarkable. It helps, I think, to be part of a religious tradition which bids its adherents: ‘Remember that you were strangers in Egypt..’ as Rita reminded us.

Several of us from HJC were at various times clustered round the book table, inspecting the literary wares that were temptingly displayed. And out of conversations arising in this context, Julian has agreed (I think!) to lay on some Hebrew study days for those of us who are interested – for which b’racha to come, I give thanks!

Angela West

Alison Turner writes:

It was amazing to be part of the South West Regional Shabbaton in Swindon and find that we had people from 9 different Liberal communities as part of our Shabbat service. I was honoured to be called up on behalf of Herefordshire Jewish Community, for the reading from our very own Torah scroll by Rabbi Danny Rich. He pointed out that the name of Esau in our portion Vayishlach was written with dots around it, not as a pronunciation guide but as a warning that here was a man who was not good. He told us that Esau had been seen to have many negative traits by commentators, though Jacob had reason to be worried meeting him for the first time in 34 years, after stealing his blessing.   The exchange between them in Hebrew carries connotations that a simple translation would miss, so it is important to look at the original. It was very special to be part of a large congregation of Liberal Jews, praying together, and the earlier session I went to prepared me for it well.

This was taken by Alexander Massey and it was a meditation on Elohai N’shamah for which he has written music and devised physical movements. We discussed the nature of the soul, where and what it is, now and after the death of the body, which was a very deep way to start the day. I found it allowed me to move from worrying about the mechanics of my travel to Swindon and properly get into a Shabbat state of mind, literally take a breath and stop mundane worries and enter into the day of rest, ready for the prayer service. His work is available on www.alexandermassey.com which has the music as well as the words in Hebrew and English and transliteration, source readings and reflections. 

In the afternoon I went to an interesting conversation between Rabbi Danny Rich and Gary Webber on different Jewish denominations. Their experiences were mirror images of each other, Rabbi Danny did not discover Jewish Orthodoxy until he went to University, he had a traditional Liberal upbringing in South London, going to Friday evening and Saturday morning services every week, so to him normative Judaism is Liberal and he rejects any notion that it is less worthy than Orthodoxy. He sees Liberal Judaism as a prophetic form of Judaism, founded by ideologues, in contrast to Reform Judaism which he sees as similar in theology but different in history and culture. On the other hand, Gary grew up with Orthodoxy and knew little about Progressive Judaism until he was an adult. Now he goes to Liberal, Reform and Masorti congregations and Limmud twice a year with his family. They agreed that all the Rabbis are trained at the same college for all these movements, and we discussed some of the reasons for the failure of previous attempts to create one Progressive movement and the situation across Europe.

I finished the day making dreidl decorations for Chanukah under the expert guidance of Sue Naydorf, and came away with many ideas for future craft sessions. I explained that at 10 months my son was about to have his first Chanukah, so the time has not yet come when he can light his own candles, even cardboard ones.  In all, it was a most interesting chance to meet, pray, have lunch, make and discuss with other Liberal Jews in our part of the world, and it was good to have a whole day to do it.  

Alison Turner

Jacqui Hannan writes:

Coming into Liberal Judaism comparatively recently, there may be a simplistic element from my point of view of the SW Shabbaton, as I still tend to regard myself as a”freshman” and everything is seen for the first time. This is by no means a reflection on LJ hospitality that has always been superlatively warm with the Shabbaton being no exception. After a straightforward journey via Gloucester from Hereford, we were immersed into the friendly relaxed atmosphere at the ideal hotel venue. From the good selection of sessions the first was appropriate for my learning situation and interests “Beit Midrash: Identity” which was led by Rabbi Sandra Kviat, in a lively manner. We looked at different aspects of Jewish identity, Biblical quotes and profound statements. Particularly notable is the paragraph by Lev Chadash that begins “Who is a Jew?” followed by (paraphrasing) Jews feel conscious of a connection as though they have met before…”..It may have been at Sinai, where according to tradition, all the unborn souls of the Children of Israel were assembled.” Rabbi Sandra spoke about Jacob’s struggle (Gen. 32.39), which was part of this week’s Torah study. It was interesting to have the opportunity to split into couples and groups to explore our personal perspectives, history and experiences in our walks, and in the case of conversion participants like myself, review our expectations. I had the opportunity to talk with a man who completed his conversion course this summer, who like me, had not come into Judaism from an uninformed platform, but rather as a chosen pathway as the result of wider experience and study as a mature person. I realise I am not alone in being “led by my heart” and “seeking truth” in this direction, in respect for our Creator. It was a reassuring and prophylactic experience to meet some of the wide range of other SW Liberal Jewish members.

After this we participated in the Shabbat Service and beautiful singing.

Following Kiddush and a light lunch the two sessions I attended were “In conversation: Why do we need denominations”, led by Danny Rich and a “Panel discussion: Experiences of working with refugee communities”, which revealed a glimpse of some of the large number of LJ initiatives in this area. There is not space here to expand and to do the day and sessions true justice.

It was on the whole an interesting, enjoyable and useful day. Everybody I spoke had something positive to say, and I felt privileged to be there. It was good to have had the opportunity to spend more time with other HLJ members, especially Alison Turner and Angela West with whom I shared some travelling time.

However, apologies for a more negative note there was one down side – we stepped out into heavy rain! I hope the organizers can improve on that aspect next year.

Jacqui Hannan

John Davies, for whom this was the first such cross communal event he had attended says he would give it 11/10.

He says he feels there is hope for the future, but that there are lots of truths that need to be addressed by both by Judaism and other religions, and we will need both spiritual and physical courage to address these. He attended the session with Danny Rich and Gary Webber and felt that Liberal Judaism has a particular role to play.

Refugees

Following on from the Refugee workshop at the Shabbaton day, we need to ask the question ‘What can HJC do directly to help refugees? We have already made a specific donation re our High Holiday appeal and no doubt some individual members have made donations in kind to local refugee collection points. We know HJC cannot do anything on the scale of LJS or Northwood and Pinner, but perhaps we can have a collective focus – for example, on the financial front, individuals could make a regular donation to a specific charity. One of the points raised in the Shabbaton refugee session was that we must be conscious of the needs of refugees who do arrive in Britain (it was also pointed out that only a minority of these are Syrian). The process of seeking asylum is fraught with issues – social, educational, legal, health which refugees are often unsure how to deal with. Perhaps we could pool ideas on this at the next opportunity – as this an issue which is not going to go away. JB

Hebrew

At our ‘teaching’ service on 21st November, we gave out copies of the Hebrew alphabet and spent more than the usual time on looking at some of the Hebrew words in the Torah verses for the week. The Hebrew alphabet seems to feature strongly in Jewish tradition, having more character to it than the more prosaic English alphabet. In addition, Hebrew letters are also used as numbers in Israel. Following on from the service, some of us at the Shabbaton looked at books available to help those who want to participate more fully in services, and learn some simple Hebrew for familiar prayers.

This felt like a starting point which a number of members of our community have expressed an interest in. ‘If only I could just read the blessing for the reading from the Torah’ for example. There seems to be current interest in having a Hebrew learning day, or perhaps evening, when we could look at resources available (including some in the Liberal Judaism Resource Bank) which could then be used for further individual study at home. As always, time and venue will need to be decided, but anyone interested in this please contact myself or Cherry, as we will be leading the sessions.

Short article on the alphabet to follow for anyone interested.

JB

Hebrew Alphabet

Early Hebrew alphabet was used by the Jews in the period before the Babylonian Exile–i.e., prior to the 6th century BC. As is usual in early alphabets, it has many local variants and also shows development over time. The Early Hebrew alphabet, like the modern Hebrew variety, had 22 letters, with only consonants represented, and was written from right to left; but the early alphabet is more closely related in letter form to the Phoenician than to the modern Hebrew.

Between the 6th and 2nd century BC, Classical, or Square, Hebrew gradually displaced the Aramaic alphabet, which had replaced Early Hebrew in Palestine. Square Hebrew became established in the 2nd and 1st centuries BC and developed into the modern Hebrew alphabet over the next 1,500 years. Though obviously derived from the Aramaic alphabet rather than from Early Hebrew it was nonetheless strongly influenced by the Early Hebrew script. Classical Hebrew showed three distinct forms by the 10th century AD: Square Hebrew, a formal or book hand; rabbinical or “Rashi-writing,” employed by medieval Jewish scholars; and various local cursive scripts, of which the Polish-German type became the modern cursive form.

The Square Hebrew Alphabet 

From: http://www.orbilat.com/General_References/Alphabets/The_Hebrew_Alphabet.html

Hereford & Malvern Foodbanks

We are still collecting for Hereford and Malvern Food Banks at all services.

Please buy just one extra item from this list and leave it at our collection point.

Items requested by Hereford Food Bank are:

  • Tins: Meat – hot or cold; vegetables; fruit; rice pudding.
  • Dry goods: Smash potato; rice; powdered custard; dried milk; instant coffee; sugar

  • General: UHT milk; pasta sauce; jam; marmalade; instant/microwave meals.
  • Hygiene: Shampoo; toothpaste; soap; household cleaners e.g. washing up liquid, detergent.

Thank you. Any queries please contact them on 01432 353347

Malvern Food Bank has sent a letter of thanks or our recent donations.

 

London Klezmer Quartet – Bridges Centre, Monmouth 5 December

This was a sell out success and a wonderful evening, so a big thank you to Mark for setting this up with Wye Valley Music Society.

London Klezmer Quartet are not only the leading Klezmer music group in the UK, running workshops and playing at events, they are also delightful to watch and listen to, with their effortless, but endlessly creative variations on both traditional and contemporary melodies. They also have a great deal of humour, for example, their story of how when travelling in Australia, they found themselves short of a (double) bass player, so looked up ‘Lonely Australian klezmer bass players.com’ and found one brilliant bass player (only one of course, as she was lonely), who had Latvian heritage and is now playing with them in the UK. This bass player also sings in Yiddish so we had three or four vocal numbers, varying in theme from potatoes (bulbas) to borscht to lost love and the Czar’s army.

All the players were very talented and each with their particular strengths, from the astonishing clarinet playing to the sensitive and emotional accordion playing to the dancing violin sounds of their leader Ilana Kravitz. Everyone seemed to enjoy the evening immensely and it is such a thrill to have real live Klezmer music in Monmouth, giving an opportunity for HJC member as well as local residents to experience some Jewish culture.

Forthcoming Events

Limmud Conference – Birmingham, 27 – 31 December 2015

When? Limmud Conference will be taking place from Sunday 27 to Thursday 31 December 2015. It will be preceded by Limmud Shabbat from Friday 25 to Saturday 26 December. We look forward to you joining us there!

Where? The hotels surrounding Pendigo Lake, just outside Birmingham, UK. More detailed information on our exciting new site can be found by visiting the frequently asked questions page. See: http://limmud.org/conference/

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 January 2016

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 wds, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Saturday 12th December

Chanukah service and party, led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

3 p.m.

Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford, HR2 6HE

Saturday 23rd January

Shabbat Service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

11 a.m.

Ale House Colwall

Saturday 27th February

Shabbat service led by Rabbi Margaret Jacobi

11.a.m.

Ale House Colwall 

Other Events of Interest

27th Dec – 31st Dec 2015

Limmud Winter Conference – residential or day places available.

Birmingham

 

Programme for South West Regional Shabbaton announced

The Regional Shabbaton  will be in Swindon on Saturday 28 November, 10am-6pm.  It will be at Jury’s Inn, Swindon, Fleming Way SN1 2NG

This is a joint venture brought to you by Liberal Judaism’s communities in Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Oxford, Reading, Wessex, and Bristol & West. It is a Liberal Judaism event, kindly sponsored by the NLPS Trust.

A relaxing day of Jewish learning, services and community.

Book online at www.tinyurl.com/southwestshabbaton or call Aaron Abraham at Liberal Judaism on 0207 631 9830

Cost is £20 for adults, £5 for children (includes lunch and refreshments)

10:00 – 10:20
Registration in Foyer

10:20 – 11:20
Morning Session 1: Beit Midrash: Identity
Guided chevrutah text study on the week’s themed reading.
Rabbi Sandra Kviat
Room 4

Morning Session 2: Prayer Before Prayer
Preparation for prayer through music and meditation.
Alexander Massey
Room 5

Youth Session: Who are we? (ages 5-9)
Games and activities to explore what makes us who we are.
LJY-Netzer
Room 6

Youth Session: What makes us Jewish? (ages 10-15)
Games and a chance to consider what makes a Jew.
LJY-Netzer
Room 7

11:30 – 13:00
Shabbat Service
Musical service, with sermon from Rabbi Danny Rich.
Rabbi Monique Meyer
Room 4

Youth Shabbat Service
Creative service for 5-15 year-olds – LJY Netzer Style!
Rabbi Sandra Kviat
Room 6

13:00 – 14:30
Kiddush & Lunch in Foyer & Restaurant

14:30 – 15:45
Early Afternoon Session 1: Why are we Liberal?
In Conversation: Do we still need Jewish denominations?
Rabbi Danny Rich & Gary Webber
Room 4

Early Afternoon Session 2: From Chelm to Chasid
Enjoy and learn how to use storytelling in your community.
Julian Brown
Room 5

Early Afternoon Session 3: Sustaining Community
Practical workshop and sharing about outreach and continuity.
Rabbi Anna Gerrard
Room 6

Youth Session 1: Leaving Home (ages 5-9)
Creative activities and learning about refugees.
LJY-Netzer
Room 7

Youth Session 2: In a Strange Land (ages 10-15)
A session about Judaism, the refugee crisis and peer leadership.
LJY-Netzer
Room 8

15:45 – 16:15
Afternoon Tea in Foyer

16:15 – 17:30
Late Afternoon Session 1: Refugee Matters
Panel Discussion: Experiences of working with refugee communities – chaired by Rabbi Danny Rich.
Tony Samuel, Rita Adler & Rabbi Lea Muehlstein
Room 4

Late Afternoon Session 2: Tomorrow’s Siddur
Share your views about the possibility of a new Liberal siddur.
Nicky Spencer-Hutchings
Room 5

Late Afternoon Session 3: Chanukah Crafts (ages 0-99)
Have fun making Chanukah decorations for your home.
Sue Naydorf
Rooms 6 & 7

17:30-18:00
Havdallah in Foyer

Liberal Judaism South West Regional Shabbaton

A relaxing day of Jewish learning, Shabbat services,
interesting workshops, youth activities and great food. An opportunity to meet, pray, learn, study and eat together with friends and teachers old and new.

On: Saturday 28th November 2015, 10am to 6pm
At:  Jury’s Inn, Swindon, Fleming Way, SN1 2NG

Cost: £20 for adults, £5 for children (Includes lunch & refreshments)

Book online: www.tunyurl.com/southwestshabbaton

Or call Aaron Abraham at Liberal Judaism on 0207 631 9830

This is a Liberal Judaism event, kindly sponsored by the NLPS Trust.

Subjects of the day will include:

Torah
Liturgy
Havdallah
Music
Youth
Identity
Debate

Shabbat
Food
Meditation
Siddur
Refugees
Craft
Discussion

This is a joint event by Liberal Jewish communities in:

Bristol & West
Wessex
Oxford
Reading
Herefordshire
Gloucestershire

 

Herefordshire Jewish Community Newsletter October/November 2015

Editorial

Now we have passed the end of the High Holydays, we embark on a new phase in the year. We have been reviewing and re-focussing ourselves, especially our inner selves as we have been through the intense period between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, and the ‘Day of Atonement’ itself. We start the New Year with new clarity and new intentions. Now we come to Succoth, where one of our tasks is to sit in a Succah, or temporary dwelling, to remind ourselves how we were once tent dwellers and wanderers. In present times, we cannot but also think of the many refugees who have no option but to live in tents, and so our lives turn to social action and our contributions to the communities in which we live.

One of the messages from Yom Kippur this year has been that we have to live both these parts of our lives to the best of our ability: reflecting on our actions as individuals, but also taking action out in the world to do what we can to create the world in which we want to live, both for ourselves and others.

Julian Brown

In this edition:

Bible week Limmud in the Woods

Community events: Rededication ceremony High Holyday services

Peace Day Event London Klezmer Quartet visit

CHAIR CHAT

CEMETERY REDEDICATION, SUNDAY SPTEMBER

It was good to see all the stones back in their rightful position and it was wonderful to have Susan Moore (formerly Kirkhope, one of the founder members of HJC) who could tell us more about the people who were buried there. We were surprised to find one unmarked grave there and we have already made enquiries to the cemetery authorities to see what we can do to rectify this. Julian led prayers for us at the cemetery before we all went back to Saxon Hall for a cup of tea before our Erev Rosh Hashanah service.

HIGH HOLYDAY SERVICES.

We held both of these this year at Saxon Hall in Hereford, which will probably now become our new base in Hereford, as it has excellent facilities. We can also keep an eye on how the “Anne Frank” tree is doing. Many thanks to Julian for leading the Kol Nidrei service and for some effective shofar blowing.

SIMCHAT TORAH SERVICE.

My favourite of the year and a welcome return to Rabbi Anna. We had a great service last year and I’m sure this year will be no different. Please make every effort to come along to the Bridges Centre in Monmouth at 7 p.m. (Post code of Bridges for those who haven’t been there before is NP25 5AS).

HJC COUNCIL

I have to say that it has been a bit of a struggle to keep going! We are all very much missing Andrea who knew where everything was and was very much the lynchpin of the community. We’re delighted to hear that her health has improved and look forward to welcoming her back to our services shortly. Meanwhile, we are soon going to have to say good bye to Steve Lavender who is moving to Cardiff and would like to thank him for all the help he has given us. We wish a speedy recovery to Hanna Wine who is convalescing in London. Alison Turner has kindly agreed to take on the role of interim treasurer. So our Council is now very thin on the ground. If anyone would like to join us, please let me know!

Mark Walton

Peace Day Service Sunday 20th September 2015, Hereford Cathedral

On Sunday 20th September, as an observance of The international Day of Peace (on Monday 21st September), the Herefordshire interfaith Group held a Peace service at Hereford Cathedral. The service started with candle lighting by representatives of the different faith groups gathered. The service included music and readings from 8 faiths or more, also including a Jewish contribution (reading on Peace from Rabbi John Rayner, and singing of Lo Yisa Goy – Nation shall not lift up sword against nation) led by Julian and myself. In all, this was a lovely event, which felt open and inclusive, and the Interfaith group are hoping to hold more events over the coming year.

Cherry Wolfe

Summer Events

A Report on Jewish Christian Bible Week 2015

In August this year, I attended the 47th International Jewish Christian Bible Week at Haus Ohrbeck near Osnabrueck in Germany. My first experience of this rather unique gathering was in 2006 – and since then I have returned to it six times. Bible Week is the sort of thing that people go back to – sometimes year after year. What is so special about it?

It was founded in 1968 by Rabbi Jonathan Magonet, then a young rabbinic student, together with some older Catholic sisters. They were no doubt inspired by that huge shift in the Church’s attitude to Jews, marked by the publication of Vatican encyclical Nostra Aestate. From then onwards, for more than 40 years, Jews and Christians from Germany, England, the Netherlands, Israel, the USA and other countries have been coming together each summer to study biblical texts against the background of the two traditions. Rabbi Magonet later became the Principal of Leo Baeck College, and among those who come from UK, there is always a contingent who have connections of one sort or other with Leo Baeck. Rabbi Jonathan, now retired and a grandfather, continues to play a key role in Bible Week. From the playful exercise on the first evening to accustom us to the theme (and each other), through his sermon at the Sabbath liturgy, to the singing on the last night of three special songs fiercely prescribed by custom, his is a presiding presence.

However, the day to day running and leadership of the event is managed by a highly competent team which is also representative of the diverse participants. Each year, one particular book from the Hebrew scriptures is taken as the subject of study in the groups that take place every morning for five days. This year there were 11 of such groups, and each participant is attached to one of them. The tasks of the groups range from ‘Intensive study of the Hebrew Text’, through to a ‘Creative response to the text through Visual (or other) arts’. And then there’s also the Children’s group.

A Children’s group? Why on earth would there be one of those in a gathering apparently devoted to such studious pursuits? The fact is that Bible Week is not quite what it seems from the label. In many ways, it’s more like a huge house party where you meet up each year with friends – people active in their professions and communities, older people including some of the very old, younger ones including young families (and even some teenagers) to discuss, argue, play and celebrate together in a well established way – also remembering those who have passed on, and welcoming those who have joined us for the first time. In fact, there are always newcomers. This year more people applied than ever before. 136 people attended, with ages ranging from 4 months to 80 years, but still there was a waiting list, and someone who had to drop out at the last minute could straight away be replaced.

But what of the text? This year our text was Qohelet (Ecclesiastes), one of the five Megillot and a book which in many ways sits oddly in the Hebrew canon. Its writer seems not at all to engage with the God of Abraham and Isaac, who delivered Israel from Egypt, and is zealous for the keeping of his covenant. Was Qohelet then a world-weary sage for whom ‘everything is vanity/futility’ and ‘there is nothing new under the sun’ ? For whom God is a distant and passive ‘elohim’ unconcerned with any human affairs? Or is he someone who is subtly mocking the worldly wisdom and popular philosophy of the early Hellenistic age, and at last affirms that, although God’s purpose for us is ultimately unknowable, ‘the sum of the matter, when all is said and done, is to revere God and keep his commandments’?

These were the kind of questions that we discussed in our groups, and they were also addressed in the three main lectures, one by a Jewish scholar, one by a Christian scholar, and one who is chosen only in relation to their special expertise in the text of this year. The opinions of the scholars at these three lectures are always respectfully listened to, but it is by no means only they who have a chance to speak. Most afternoons and some evenings, anyone is free to offer a ‘Speaker’s Corner’ topic or some ‘Fringe’ entertainment, and many do so. Nor is it only those with intellectual or scholarly contributions who get a chance to shine. Musical, artistic or comic talents are much in demand – specially at the Apodosis (concluding concert & talent show) on the last night.

This aim of making everyone feel included seems to be the hallmark of Bible Week, whether it’s keeping a balance between Jewish or Christian, German or English speaking, women and men, Catholic and Protestant, young and old. With all these to include, the weekends are liturgically rich, and sometimes a trifle overwhelming! But there is also a beauty about the harmonious interfaith cooperation and mutual respect, which I have rarely seen elsewhere. The majority of Jews present are from the progressive wings of Judaism, but those with a more Orthodox orientation are also catered for. All food for the week is vegetarian, but at least one family has stricter requirements in respect of food – and the kitchen is well able to cope with special diets, whether kosher or lactose free!

There is no doubt that Bible Week has been in some sense constructed around Rabbi Jonathan, his unique vision and teaching capacity. Yet, in one of the songs he composed – and is never allowed not to sing every year at the Apodosis – he affectionately honours the memory of those Catholic sisters who were his fellow founders. ‘Who is bound and who is free?’ goes its poignant refrain, gently suggesting that those who chose to live a ‘restricted’ life of religious commitment, may have something important to teach about the nature of real freedom.

But when all is said and done (to borrow a phrase from Qohelet) it is somehow, by an unspoken consensus, the Jews who are the hosts at this unique event, even in (perhaps specially in) its distinctive inclusivity. Here on German soil, where Jews were brutally driven out to their deaths more than 50 years ago, descendants of the survivors now offer a very particular kind of hospitality to those who come in order to learn, to understand the lessons of that history, and to share with each other the search for wisdom in our traditions.

Angela West

Limmud in the Woods

Over August Bank holiday weekend, myself, my wife Cherry, and our daughter Maya attended Limmud in the Woods, which is the only event of the many organised by the Limmud Jewish Education movement, which is held under canvas, and for that reason also creates a stronger community of it’ s members, than perhaps other larger Limmud events. For four days we camped in a lovely setting – a large open space, which indeed was surrounded by woods, which also played a part in some of the events that took place over the period. Each member of the impromptu Limmud community was also asked to contribute 4 hours of their time over the 4 days towards maintaining the camp and doing necessary chores from putting up fences, or setting up floodlights in the woods, to chopping spring onions for salad for 120 people.

The programme is as varied as you could imagine, from sessions on the environment, Jewish meditation, and T’ai Chi, to study of biblical Text, kashrut, wild and edible plants, and of course debate on the Middle East and Israel. So there is always something to suit all tastes and levels of Jewish interest and orthodoxy. This is one of the wonderful things about Limmud in that it can hold within its format a wide range of Jewish practice, as well as cater for all ages and backgrounds.

Workshops run all day from early morning running or yoga sessions at 8 a.m., through to 6 p.m. when there is dinner, and, although it is tempting to go for a walk in the woods, or just spend time reading by your tent, I found that most days I was keen to attend my full complement of sessions. As usual, the only difficulty with Limmud is being sure you’ve made the right choice of session when each one has something of particular interest. Do I go to a workshop on a novel Israeli approach to developing communication in communities , or a session on Literature and poetry? Feeling what is right for you at any moment of the day is an important task.

One of the most inspiring workshops, for all of us in my family was one which ran over two sessions given by a young woman, Sara Moon, who had cycled from the UK (Sheffield) to the West Bank (admittedly, taking boats for two parts of the journey), which was a particular mission of hers, socially , environmentally and politically. It was clear from her talk that she was very keen to develop her knowledge, experience and engagement both with the Palestinians who lived on the West Bank, and with whom she picked olives, and with the Israelis, where she wanted to find out more about her Jewish roots and history. The cycle journey, from which she showed us some wonderful photos, was very much a journey of discovery for her, and one in which she received such kindness and support from people along the way, that it was also a story of humanity.

To return to the picture of Limmud, two further elements need to be mentioned. The evening entertainment was also a novel experience in many ways. From bonfires, to a Ceilidh, to an impromptu discussion café, and a late night ’silent disco’ as well as further talks and films, there was always a choice. One of the least expected and yet most enjoyable for me was the silent disco, DJ’d by the ‘Rebbetsen’ , where you listened to music through a set of headphones, and could dance to the music if you wished, but if you took the headphones off there was blissful silence, and you could sip a drink from the bar either in musical or quiet mood.

Finally, no report of Limmud event such as this would be complete without reference to the unique Shabbat experience. From the alternative musical progressive evening service held in a stepped mini amphitheatre in the woods, to the first ever Limmud attempt to combine liberal/reform and orthodox services into one, for the Shabbat morning service, this was definitely something different. Before Havdalah many of sat out under the darkening skies singing niggunim (wordless melodies) until it was time for the ceremony. Shabbat gave you a chance to socialise more with others, when the pace of the day was less, but only slightly less frantic than other days in the camp.

If you can cope with the camping, and would like a Limmud where the numbers are much smaller than Limmud conference or even one day events, I would recommend this as a true learning experience, after which you may never quite see the associations of being Jewish in the same way as before.

Julian Brown

Hereford Cemetery Stones

Following our rededication of gravestones at Hereford Cemetery pre-Rosh Hashanah, Susan Moore has kindly sent in information she gave us during the ceremony re past members of the community. Perhaps we can build on this to create a community history archive. There will be more on this in the next edition of HJC newsletter.

:

1 HJC members at rededication ceremony

Markers and gravestones in Jewish section, Hereford Cemetery

Rabbi Bernard Hooker

When we started The Herefordshire Jewish Community, Rabbi Hooker and his wife Eileen had retired to Ledbury. He was born in London in 1922 and trained at Jews’ college. He was the youngest Chaplain to be appointed to the Armed Forces serving on the Rhine and in the Middle East. He later served as Minister to the Birmingham Progressive Synagogue and the Wembley Liberal Synagogue until in 1965 he was invited to become the Spiritual Leader of the Jewish Community in Jamaica. Whilst there, he wrote many books, serving the community for 10 years.

On his return to London he became Minister of the North London Progressive Synagogue and was a Vice President of the ULPS for many years.

He was a marvellous support for us giving much advice on starting and running the group and leading services ourselves. He conducted many of our High Holy Day, and Seder Services.

Marion and Gerald Weisbloom

Marion and Gerald lived in Malvern and joined the group shortly after it started. They were friendly and enthusiastic members, working on the Committee and often offering the use of their home for meetings and services. They both had a love of music and also for walking. A small group of us had many an enjoyable “Sunday Ramble” usually ending at a Public House for lunch! After Marion’s death Gerry served as Chairman of the Community.

Max and Ilsa Conu

Max and Ilsa joined the Group from the first meeting. They were both older members and retired – I believe Max had had and Engineering Business in Hereford. Ilsa came to many of the services and they were both particularly pleased and enthusiastic for the provision of the Cemetery area!

Ilsa enjoyed playing Bridge and had been a member of the Bowls Club. She also enjoyed Horse Racing and indeed her “wake” was held at the Racecourse.

Joseph Collard

I know little about him, as his wife Miriam was the member of the Community and would come with their daughter Yudit. Miriam once appeared on Mastermind! The funeral service was conducted by (then Student Rabbi) Janet Burden who many of us knew, with the ashes later interred at Hereford.

Josephine and George Waldren

Again they were very early members and supporters of the Community, but already well on in years by the time it started. I don’t think they had any children.

Irvine Rose

Irvine Rose had lived for many years in Hereford and although retired when I met him, he had had a hairdressing salon in the city. He did remember a much earlier Orthodox Jewish group in Hereford which died out because of lack of members. He helped us a lot with the Hebrew prayers, and he was survived by his son (Michael I think).

David Springer

Many of you will remember David who served as our Chairman for many years from the beginning of the Community. He was a wonderful and friendly person with a huge enthusiasm for the Group. He had lived in Hereford since 1969 and was one of the first people to respond to Josephine’s advertisement in 1991, coming with his cousin to the first meeting in December. David used his particular strengths to work for the Community, not least being in obtaining all the items needing for our Passover celebrations, travelling to London and Birmingham as necessary. His wife Mary did and still does all the cooking for these wonderful evenings. David had a Music Shop in Hereford and used his considerable keyboard skills in making cassettes of the traditional Jewish melodies so that we could learn them and sing them in our services. He also took upon himself the compiling and reading out of the names of loved ones in the memorial service on Kol Nidre. Committee meetings with David were great fun with lots of jokes. He came to rest in the Jewish Cemetery far too early.

Marcelle Greenbaum

We were contacted by Social Services when Marcelle was placed in a small self managed group home near Malvern. She was Jewish by birth but following a road accident in London had suffered a brain injury and had been placed by her family in a Mental Institution, which was then closed. She loved coming to our meetings, especially ones held in our homes, and hearing songs remembered from her youth. She was a sweet person but we never met any of her family. It is a shame that her grave is not marked in any way, and perhaps a small subscription could be raised by the Community to pay for a simple marker.

Contributed by Susan Moore (formerly Kirkhope)

Hereford Food Bank

We are still collecting for Hereford and Malvern Food Banks at all services.

Please buy just one extra item from this list and leave it at our collection point.

Items requested by Hereford Food Bank are:

  • Tins: Meat – hot or cold; vegetables; fruit; rice pudding.
  • Dry goods: Smash potato; rice; powdered custard; dried milk; instant coffee; sugar.
  • General: UHT milk; pasta sauce; jam; marmalade; instant/microwave meals.
  • Hygiene: Shampoo; toothpaste; soap; household cleaners e.g. washing up liquid, detergent.

Thank you. Any queries please contact them on 01432 353347

 

Welfare

We wish Alan Toffel a good recovery. Alan came to our Rosh Hashanah service, and has been staying in Hereford since then, through a period of illness.

There’s still chance to donate to our

HJC Charity High Holyday Appeal

Our two charities for this year are:

St Michael’s Hospice, Hereford (http://www.st-michaels-hospice.org.uk/)

and Children of Peace (charity for Israel & Middle East https://www.childrenofpeace.org.uk/)

We are also making additional donations this year in aid of refugees to Medecins sans Frontieres.

Please send your donations for this to our interim Treasurer – Alison Turner

Forthcoming Events

Limmud Conference – Birmingham, 27 – 31 December 2015

When? Limmud Conference will be taking place from Sunday 27 to Thursday 31 December 2015. It will be preceded by Limmud Shabbat from Friday 25 to Saturday 26 December. We look forward to you joining us there!

Where? The hotels surrounding Pendigo Lake, just outside Birmingham, UK. More detailed information on our exciting new site can be found by visiting the frequently asked questions page. See: http://limmud.org/conference/

South West Regional Shabbaton Communities involved will include Bristol, Gloucestershire, Oxford, Reading, Wessex and Herefordshire.

LIBERAL JUDAISM SOUTH WEST REGIONAL SHABBATON A relaxing day of Jewish learning, services and community Saturday 28th November 2015, 10am to 6pm Jury’s Inn, Swindon, Fleming Way, SN1 2NG. For full details see poster attached to your email. Early booking if possible and no later than 20 November, please. We will try to coordinate travel for HJC members wishing to attend.

HJC are actively participating in planning of this event, so we hope that as many members as possible will be able to attend the day. Previous Shabbatons have been thoroughly enjoyed by all who have attended.

Book online: www.tunyurl.com/southwestshabbaton

Or call Aaron Abraham at Liberal Judaism on 0207 631 9830

London Klezmer Quartet –Bridges Centre, Monmouth, Saturday 5th December@7.30 p.m. This is one of the premier Klezmer groups in the country, and we are lucky that they will be playing relatively locally. This should be a wonderful evening, so do save the date.

Tickets (£15) from Mark Walton or available online (see below):

 http://www.wyevalleymusic.org.uk/tckts_online.html

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 November

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 wds, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Friday 2nd October

Simchat Torah Service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

7 p.m.

Bridges Centre, Monmouth NP25 5AS

Saturday 24th October

Shabbat Service, Lech Lecha, led by Student Rabbi Igor Zinkov

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall WR13 6HJ

Sat 21st November

Shabbat Service, led by Julian Brown. This will be a service focussing on Hebrew and learning.

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

WR13 6HJ

Saturday 12th December

Chanukah service and party, led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

3 p.m.

Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Other Events of Interest

Saturday 28 November

South West Regional Shabbaton

www.tunyurl.com/southwestshabbaton

10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Jury’s Inn, Swindon

SN1 2NG

Saturday 5 December

London Klezmer Quarter performance,

7.30 p.m.

Bridges Centre, Monmouth. NP25 5AS

Herefordshire Jewish Community Newsletter August/September 2015

Editorial

We will soon be approaching the High Holydays, but before that we have the month of Elul which is traditionally a time of reflection and introspection, in preparation for the New Year and Yom Kippur. As well as reflecting on our own deeds over the past year, this year, we also have a duty to think about others. For the first time, for this month of August, Liberal and Reform Judaism have linked up with the Council for Christians and Jews (CCJ) in a joint initiative entitled ‘If not now, when?’ This encourages us to take action on the persecution of Christian communities in the Middle East, which is sadly currently taking place in dramatic fashion, and which reminds us of the persecution we have similarly have encountered in previous times. I recently read an interview with one Christian refugee fleeing from persecution (and there will surely be others) who was amongst those in the so called migrant camp at Calais, so we need to remember that each person in the camp has a story, and remember also that many of our community are descended from refugees to this country.

Looking ahead to the HJC calendar for the next few months, we have a wide variety of activities to take part in – social, cultural and educational, as well as services. This year we are taking part in the South West small communities Shabbaton in November, which will include a day of workshops, talks, and activities which should have something to suit all members, and we hope to have a contingent attending from HJC. We can also look forward to a performance in Monmouth by London Klezmer Quartet in December, which, while not sponsored by HJC, will surely be an event we might like to attend. Finally, at this time of review, we are always looking for different ideas for activities within our own community, so if you have a particular interest which you think may suit other HJC members, let us know.

Julian Brown

In this edition:

Chair Chat Anne Frank Day Danny Rich Service

Month of Reflection Book Review Hereford Food Bank

Etgar Keret –Israeli Essayist Forthcoming Events

CHAIR CHAT

NEW LJ SIDDUR

There is a regular LJ Chair email forum which I rarely contribute to. However, I did join in this one as there seemed to be a growing feeling that we didn’t really need another siddur, it would be expensive and time consuming to produce and costly for small communities to replace their existing siddurim. Some communities said they actually preferred the Reform siddur and I suggested that if there was to be a new one then it should be a joint progressive undertaking between LJ and the Reform movement so that it could be used by congregations in both organisations, combining the best elements from both traditions. I also personally prefer the Reform siddur with translations and explanations of the rationale and origin of certain prayers on the same page. It was suggested that my proposal would never be accepted as a combined prayer book would be seen as the “thin end of the wedge” in encouraging a merger between the two organisations. What would be the problem with that? Which leads into …..

REFORM MOVEMENT AND PATRILINEALITY

Very encouraging that the Reform rabbis are seriously considering this which is now the only outstanding doctrinal difference between the two movements. See, http://news.reformjudaism.org.uk/press-releases/reform-rabbis-balance-tradition-and-welcome.html

There is also an interesting clip on the subject of patrilineality on the BBC website of a discussion between Reform Rabbi Jonathan Romain and Dr Yaakov Wise representing orthodoxy – no meeting of minds between the two!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b062hn6n

Is there any logical reason now for the two movements not to combine to form one strong and influential Progressive voice?

Mark Walton

Anne Frank Day

Members of Herefordshire Jewish Community were privileged to take part in a joint interfaith celebration/commemoration on the theme of ‘courage’ to mark Anne Frank day on Friday 12th June, in order to remember children who have been killed through war and conflict, as well as to commemorate the courage of all those who have given their service to protect our own rights and freedoms in recent times.

Both Christian and Jewish services contributed to the atmosphere of the occasion, as more than 70 people gathered outside the Community centre to see the garden of remembrance, the tree planted in honour of Anne Frank, and the unveiling of a plaque in honour of Anne Frank and other children. It felt a very unified occasion with both Reverend Philip Brown and Rabbis Danny Rich and Anna Gerrard leading thoughtful and moving prayers to mark the occasion. It was wonderful to see so many representatives of Hereford City, Church, ex-service personnel and community organisations, praying together with members of the Jewish community. Singing by teenagers from a local school as well as bugle playing added to the sense of the occasion.

The services were followed by a magnificent tea in Saxon Hall. This gave everyone an opportunity to socialise as well as to see the photographic exhibition on the life of Anne Frank, and watch a video presentation of the development of the remembrance garden. Presentations were made to members of Hereford College who had worked on the creation of the garden.

The final part of the day was a Friday evening Erev Shabbat service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard of Gloucestershire Liberal Jewish Community and Rabbi Danny Rich, Chief executive of Liberal Judaism. A smaller number of Christian visitors joined in with this service together with members of Hereford Jewish Community. In addition, everyone seemed to be both surprised and impressed by the impromptu question and answer session offered by Rabbi Danny Rich. This covered a wide variety of aspects of Jewish faith, including the different strands of Judaism, the origins of Liberal and progressive Judaism, women Rabbis, our relationship with the Five Books of Moses, and attitudes to Israel.

In all, this was a very worthwhile occasion and shows what can be achieved through cooperation of many disparate groups and interests who have a shared vision and purpose. Hereford Jewish Community are very grateful to Centre Manager, Victoria Craig and Chair of Trustees, Peter Cocks for their commitment and enormous hard work in organising this event.

Julian Brown

Shabbat Service 11 July with Rabbi Danny Rich

Due to illness in Marc Turner’s family, the naming ceremony for baby Isaac had to be postponed. However despite this, Rabbi Danny Rich was still kind enough to lead a service for us in Hereford Scout Hut which around 14 of us attended. The venue was a welcome change in a pleasant setting.

The parasha for the week was Pinchas. As usual Danny had much to say on a range of topics. He began by talking about Pinchas’ zealotry in killing Jews who had been consorting with Midianites, which even some of Pinchas’ compatriots did not necessarily approve of. Danny went on to talk about the need for care over the way we understand the Torah Law. Just because there is a law does not necessarily mean we have to implement it, so while Pinchas was within his legal rights to kill the men who had been with the Midianite women, he did not necessarily need to exercise this right – perhaps there could have been some other form of punishment. He also then alluded to the actions of ISIS in the name of Islam, and pointed out that even if violent punishment is prescribed in the Koran, Muslims today can choose not to exercise that right.

He also spoke about the transfer of leadership from Moses to Joshua which we read in the Torah piece, and from Elijah to Elisha which we read in the Haftarah. In both cases the successor was someone offering more thought and introspection compared with the charismatic and more outgoing figure that preceded him, but this was what was required at the time.

We are all very grateful for Danny making his second visit to HJC within a month. 

Hereford Food Bank

We are still collecting for Hereford and Malvern Food Banks at all services.

Please buy just one extra item from this list and leave it at our collection point.

Items requested by Hereford Food Bank are:

  • Tins: Meat – hot or cold; vegetables; fruit; rice pudding.
  • Dry goods: Smash potato; rice; powdered custard; dried milk; instant coffee; sugar.
  • General: UHT milk; pasta sauce; jam; marmalade; instant/microwave meals.
  • Hygiene: Shampoo; toothpaste; soap; household cleaners e.g. washing up liquid, detergent.

Thank you. Any queries please contact them on 01432 353347

Welfare – Andrea is currently housebound but improving gradually and in receipt of good regular care visits. Rosalie had a fall on the road several weeks ago and is much improved.

BBooook Review – The Dogs and the Wolves by Irène Némirovsky

Book review – Irene Nemirovsky – The Dogs and The Wolves.

Irene Némirovksy’s name may be known as the author of Suite Française, which became a film shown in cinemas earlier this year. However she wrote several other works, and I read The Dogs and The Wolves whilst in France this summer. Irene Némirovksy came from a wealthy Russian Jewish family who settled in Paris in 1920, and wrote her novels in French. The Dogs & The Wolves was published in 1940, only 2 ½ years before her deportation to Auschwitz, where she died from typhus, soon after.

This is a story of Jewish society, in particular the relationships between the lowest ranks and those at the top of the pile. It tells the story of Ada, born amongst the poorest ranks in a ghetto in Ukraine, and her cousin Ben, born amongst the highest ranks. It tells of their lives as children in the city in Ukraine in the early years of the20th century, and the subsequent life in Paris, where Ada becomes an artist, and Ben a businessman. It is a powerful and passionate book, though when I began reading it, there was little hint of how dramatic the story would become. It tells a fascinating tale of life for Jews (though not particularly observant ones) in both Ukraine and as emigrés in Paris. Némirovksy’s writing is vivid and very visual, and I would recommend this as very worthwhile.. To quote from the Jewish Women’s Archive: Irene Nemirovski was a writer….. ‘who could look inside the human soul and make music with words’. JB

Etgar Keret – The Seven Good Years – Comment

Etgar Keret is a 47 year old Israeli novelist who has recently published a collection of essays entitled ‘The Seven Good Years’ coming from the biblical story of Pharaoh’s dream of seven fat-fleshed cows and seven lean and scrawny cows standing by a river. Joseph was called on for an interpretation and explains that seven years of abundance are coming to Egypt followed by seven years of famine.

Keret explains, ‘the seven good years were the years when I was able to be both son to my father and father to my son, when I could look back and see my past and look forward and see my future’. His parents were Holocaust survivors: his father survived by living for almost 600 days in a ‘hole in the ground’ outside a Polish village. His parents wanted their children to have richer lives spiritually rather than materially.

Seven Good Years’ is not published in Israel as it is intended to communicate the Israeli reality to an outside world that sees the Israel-Palestine situation in a very black and white ‘goodies and baddies’ way and resists the idea that the reality might be more complex.

Keret writes opinion pieces on the conflict for both the Israeli and international press. In Israel, as a liberal left wing Israeli writing against the government and the Gaza war people would boycott him saying he was a traitor, and overseas people would boycott him as an Israeli. This shows the dilemma Keret faces in expressing his views.

The Seven Good Years is published by Granta. For further information see Guardian Article at: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/aug/01/etgar-keret-books-interview-israel-the-seven-good-years

Cherry Wolfe

Month of Reflection CCJ – If not now, when?

This initiative aims to encourage the Jewish community to engage in prayer and spiritual reflection on the persecution of Christians in the Middle East, extending the circle of spiritual engagement from the Christian community into the Jewish community and beyond. In conjunction with our Still An Issue initiative raising awareness of antisemitism and encouraging a response within the Christian community, we are bringing the communities closer together through profound engagement with one another’s key issues.

The spiritual engagement on this issue will be centred around the month of August, providing a focal point for the response, but we expect and intend the initiative to continue beyond this with further engagement throughout the year. A nationwide response to the persecution of Christians in the Middle East, the initiative is endorsed by our Presidents from across the Christian and Jewish spectrums.

To provide a springboard for prayer and other forms of spiritual reflection, we have created a general resource with information about Christians in the Middle East and ideas for personal and communal responses. This is supplemented by resources written by individual rabbis that may be more appropriate for use in certain denominations that also provide a more personal response to this issue. All of these resources can be found here.

There are plenty of ways for individuals or communities to engage in the initiative, either separately or coming together. You could:

  • Arrange a reciprocal visit between the local Church and Synagogue

  • Hold a cross-communal vigil, potentially in conjunction with the local CCJ branch

  • Host a joint educational event with a speaker on this issue

For more ideas, please contact cjrelations@ccj.org.uk.

Council for Christians and Jews

Background to Christian Persecution in the Middle East – see next page.

If not now, when?

There are many references in the T’nach and commentaries as to how and why we should treat others (non-Jews) fairly.

  • we are all created b’tselem Elokim – in the image of God. We believe that every person is equally significant before the divine, all human beings are equal, all human beings are unique and most importantly all human beings are of infinite value (Tzelem UK mission statement).

  • Rabbi John Rayner wrote in Siddur Lev Chadash concerning peace, that we are required ‘to denounce injustice, not only when it is committed against us, but also when it is committed against others; to defend human rights, not only our own, but theirs….’

  • Our Rabbis have taught: We support the poor of the Gentiles along with the poor of Israel, and visit the sick of the Gentiles along with the sick of Israel, and bury the poor of the Gentiles along with the dead of Israel, for these are the ways of peace. Babylonian Talmud Gittin 61a

Reform & Liberal Judaism

Forthcoming Events

Limmud in the Woods

Exploring Jewish life… Radical Simplicity. 
August bank holiday weekend 27 – 31 August 2015

Limmud in the Woods is a unique event. We spend 5 days building our own community in the countryside, sleeping under canvas and experiencing top quality Jewish learning, activities in the great outdoors and events late into the night.

Cot £199– 5 days, £100 – 2 days, £60 – one day

South West Regional Shabbaton Swindon, Saturday November 28 2015 including HJC. Communities involved will include Bristol, Gloucestershire, Oxford, Reading, Wessex and Herefordshire.

HJC are actively participating in planning of this event, so we hope that as many members as possible will be able to attend the day. Previous Shabbatons have been thoroughly enjoyed by all who have attended. Further details available soon.

London Klezmer Quartet – Monmouth, Saturday 5th December. This is one of the premier Klezmer groups in the country, and we are lucky that they will be playing relatively locally. This should be a wonderful evening, so do save the date.

 

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Sunday 13 September

Re-consecration of tombstones, followed by evening Rosh Hashanah service , led by Mark Walton

4.00 p.m. &

5.30 p.m.

Hereford Cemetery

Then at Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Tuesday 22 September

Yom Kippur Kol Nidrei service- led by Julian Brown

7 p.m.

Catholic Church Ledbury t.b.c.

Friday 2nd October

Simchat Torah Service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

7 p.m.

Bridges Centre, Monmouth

Saturday 24th October

Shabbat Service, Lech Lecha, led by student Rabbi (t.b.c.)

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

Sat 21st November

Shabbat Service, led by Julian Brown. This will be a service focusing on Hebrew and learning.

11 a.m.

Ale House, Colwall

Saturday 12th December

Chanukah service and party led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard

3 p.m.

Saxon Hall, Hoarwithy Road, Hereford HR2 6HE

Other Events of Interest

Saturday 28 November

South West Regional Shabbaton

Day event

Swindon

Saturday 5 December

London Klezmer Quarter performance,

evening

Bridges Centre, Monmouth.

Subscriptions

Note that subscriptions for HJC were due by 31 July, so if you have not already sent yours in, please send to HJC Treasurer, Hanna Wine, as soon as possible.

For more information or to join our community please contact our Chair: Mark Walton  mark.walton@bridgescentre.org.uk  Tel: 01594 530721 (eve)

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 September

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 words, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures are also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

Book Review – The Dogs and the Wolves by Irène Némirovsky

Hereford Food Bank

We are still collecting for Hereford and Malvern Food Banks at all services.

Please buy just one extra item from this list and leave it at our collection point.

Items requested by Hereford Food Bank are:

Tins: Meat – hot or cold; vegetables; fruit; rice pudding.

Dry goods: Smash potato; rice; powdered custard; dried milk; instant coffee; sugar.

General: UHT milk; pasta sauce; jam; marmalade; instant/microwave meals.

Hygiene: Shampoo; toothpaste; soap; household cleaners eg washing up liquid, detergent.

Thank you.

Any queries please contact them on 01432 353347

June/July 2015 – Shavuot Edition Newsletter HJC

Editorial

The theme of Liberal Judaism’s Day of Celebration on 7 June this year is Liberal Judaism’s ‘contemplation and celebration’ of its relationship with Israel. There is a fascinating programme, so I’m glad that Alison and Marc will be representing HJC there. The theme of our forthcoming interfaith event to mark Anne Frank day is ‘courage’ as embodied by Anne Frank as a young person, but is also to recognise those who have fought to defend human rights in recent times with the dedication of a Remembrance garden.

The themes of youth and relationships with Israel are also coincidentally covered in this issue with two separate but in many ways similar initiatives in Israel linking Israeli young people, both Arab and Jewish, one in Acco and one in Jaffa. While there are many difficult issues about how we see Israel and how Israel is seen in the diaspora, these initiatives show what can be done to sow the seeds of friendship for future generations, and we encourage HJC members to support an initiative one of these projects run by the Charles Clore Centre, who we have supported in the past.

Julian Brown

CHAIR CHAT

AGM

Many thanks to all who came to the AGM. We had a fantastic turnout (22 out of 28 members!) which was unprecedented for one of our AGMs. We were able to make some important changes to our constitution: regularising the status of non Jewish members and enabling non Jewish partners to be buried in the Jewish section of the Hereford cemetery. We were delighted that Hannah Wine agreed to join the Council. The AGM was followed by an excellent and very convivial Sunday lunch. We have decided that the Trumpet Inn is the epicentre of our community!

ANDREA BERRY-OTTAWAY

The AGM also marked the resignation of Andrea as Treasurer. As I said in my Chair’s Report, “Unfortunately, Andrea has decided to resign from the Council after 20 selfless years of service due to ill health. Andrea has been the beating heart of the community, the fount of all knowledge, the chief organiser of events and the person who has kept in touch with all our members. We will miss her tremendously and would like to thank her for the great contribution she has made to the continuity of HJC and obviously wish her a speedy return to full health.”

SHUL CRAWL

To continue my irregular series. I visited Bristol Progressive on April 11. I always feel very welcome here. It is a cosmopolitan and erudite community, probably as a result of the university presence. Rabbi Monique Mayer is obviously very popular and has an excellent rapport with congregation.

There were about 30 people at the service which contained a lot more singing than we are used to. It included a very Interesting text study on parashat “shemeini” – with the two sons of Aaron consumed by fire (or “getting zapped”, to use Monique’s term) for not doing the temple sacrifices correctly.

The shul is currently being refurbished and was thus somewhat bare although it is usually very comfortable. It is not in the most salubrious area of Bristol and difficult to find if you don’t know where you’re going.

It has a very strong cheder, apparently attracting families from as far away as Cardiff, and an excellent monthly magazine, “Alonim”.

Last, but by no means least, they normally have a good kiddush but it was much reduced when I went because of the refurbishment

EVA KOR

I was very moved by the testimony of Eva Kor who gave evidence at the recent trial of Oskar Groning, who was known as the “bookkeeper of Auschwitz”. She embraced and forgave him – an act that she was heavily criticised for by other survivors. Her parents, two older sisters and many other relatives were murdered in Auschwitz. Eva and her twin sister, Miriam, suffered terribly at the hands of the infamous Dr Josef Mengele – her sister subsequently dying, almost certainly as a result of the poisons that had been injected into her, while Eva miraculously survived. She wrote in an article in “The Times”:

“Forgiveness is different from reconciliation. Forgiveness is an act of self healing, self liberation and self empowerment. I do not need anybody’s approval or acceptance. Reconciliation takes two people, this is why it is so difficult.

I also call forgiveness the best revenge against the perpetrator. And everyone can afford it. It is free. If you do not like it, you can take back your pain. No one will stop you.

Some Holocaust survivors do not like this and some call me a traitor. I have been told that in Jewish tradition, the perpetrator must repent and ask forgiveness. Do you think that Hitler, Himmler and Mengele would have repented and asked for forgiveness? What would that do for my freedom? Should I remain a victim for the rest of my life? ………..

It is not only Jews who tend to nurture victimhood. It is an international problem. The world is filled with victims because nobody is making the right effort to help people heal.

That is why I am so passionate about forgiveness. I realised that Hitler was an angry man who considered himself a victim. Anger is a seed for war. Forgiveness is a seed for peace. I forgave the Nazis, not because they deserve it but because I deserve it.”

RABBI ANNA

We were very sorry to hear about her recent illness and wish her a speedy recovery back to full health. We were very grateful to Julian and Cherry for stepping in at short notice to lead the service on May 16.

Mark Walton

Seder 2015

Though not as large as previous years, we had an enjoyable Pesach Seder at Belmont Parish Hall this year. 

Continuing our series of interviews with community members –

Meet Your Community – Alison Turner

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in North-West London on the outskirts near Pinner, going to secondary school in Harrow, grammar, not the public school!

Was there a Jewish community there?

There was a Jewish community in Pinner, but it was much smaller than it is now.

Was your family observant/kasher etc.?

My mother and father were observant and kept a kosher home, they were members of Harrow United Synagogue I think, which has since closed. Sadly my mother died when I was only 2 years old. Then I was looked after by my father’s mother, who was from Latvia and had come from there to Belgium with her family, then gone back to Russia, escaped  after the Russian Revolution to Antwerp, married and settled in Paris, then escaped from there during the Second World War and settled in London. She thought it would be safer for me not to be Jewish, so she didn’t keep kosher or observe Judaism at all. Then my father remarried and suddenly my sister and I were in a kosher observant home, where we were members of Pinner United Synagogue. I discovered Progressive Judaism later on my own.

Have you visited Israel?

Yes I have been 4 times, first with my boyfriend for a month, then with 2 Liberal Jewish tours, then on my honeymoon.

Do you have any knowledge of Hebrew?

Not much, some prayerbook Hebrew but very little modern Hebrew.

What is your favourite Jewish food?

Smoked salmon and cream cheese bagels.

What do you value most about your Jewish connection?

Being rooted in Jewish history, family, language, food, approach to the Divine.

How has being a member of HJC influenced your Jewish identity/connection?

It has kept me part of the Liberal Jewish community even though I am now far from London and mainstream Jewish life. I think there were more Jewish people in our street when we last lived in London, then in the whole county we now live in. HJC is my lifeline to Judaism in Herefordshire.

What do you value in particular about Liberal Judaism?

Women Rabbis and the ability to question and to relate religion to 21st century modernity. I felt excluded from United Synagogue services, like an outsider watching the men pray. In Liberal services I feel included, I know my contribution counts as part of the community and women can take any role they like, whether housewife or Rabbi.

What would you say is the Jewish highlight of your life? 

My wedding to Marc at Northwood and Pinner Liberal Synagogue, conducted by Rabbis Shulamit Ambalu and Rabbi Aaron Goldstein and surrounded by family and friends, including Orthodox family and non-Jewish friends.

If you have children, are any of them involved in Jewish activities?

Too young to say, we still count his age in weeks, not months or years. He has been to Purim and Shabbat services and to a community Seder as well as Shabbat and Pesach at home. He’s booked into the creche at the Liberal Judaism Day of Celebration. We hope he will want to continue to be involved when he is older. 

Charities

Foodbank Contributions

We have made donations to both Hereford and Malvern foodbanks over the past few months, and many members of HJC have made generous contributions, which have been much appreciated by the foodbank organisers. The next opportunity to bring donations will be at the Shabbat service on 11 July. A big thanks to everyone who has supported this initiative.

Martha Trust

We have received the following letter from Martha Trust on behalf of HJC donation.

Dear Mr Brown

Thank you for your kind donation of £100.00 which will be used towards the purchase of books for our residents. We have two homes caring for people aged between 16 and 45 all of whom have complex physical and intellectual difficulties so the money will be divided between both homes.

Due to the nature of their disabilities our residents are unable to read themselves however the staff read stories to the residents on a daily basis. We also have a story sack containing various pros relating to the specific story. The carers act out the stories which the residents love and although they would not admit it I think the carers have great fun playing the various characters in the book.

I hope this is acceptable to you. Please pass on our thanks to everyone who contributed to this generous donation and for agreeing to support Martha trust.

Kind regards,

Yours sincerely,

Sue Mc Bride

Trust Director

Charles Clore Centre Summer Camp

We also thought it would be good if as a community we could support Charles Clore centre (who we have supported in the past) for a specific project – the summer Camp – see below. If you would like to support this, we will be having a collection at the Anne Frank Day service to try to raise the £100 needed to send a child to summer camp. You can also make an individual donation online (but let us know if you do this).

My Dear Friends

We are getting excited planning our Arab-Jewish Summer Camp for at-risk children in July and wish to ask if you would like to sponsor child to attend this year. 

You may remember that we wrote of the children’s huge disappointment at the cancellation of last year’s camp because of the war which made their security impossible to guarantee.  We are hoping to give them a wonderful time this year to make up for this and the more money we raise, the more children we can take.

It has been a hard year for those of us working towards a shared society.  The mistrust during the Gaza war last summer was compounded during the violence that followed within Israel and left many of us feeling hopeless.  Communities have become even more polarised and the general election here has resulted in a government whose position towards full equality is quite clear.  And yet, and because of all of this, the small things that we can affect, such as enabling poor Arab and Jewish kids to play together for three weeks during the long, hot summer, must be encouraged.  

100 British pounds will pay for a child to attend our three-week camp – to swim at a local kibbutz, to play in football tournaments, to do art, play music, enjoy daytrips and laugh and laugh.

Thank you in anticipation for enabling the children of Akko to get off the boiling and sometimes dangerous streets for this period, get to know each other and, hopefully through this experience, become part of a more just future for this country,

It’s now so easy to make a gift to our centre.  Simply click here to donate online https://support.newisraelfund.org.uk/clore-centre .

Mohammad Fahili

Director – Sir Charles Clore Jewish-Arab Community Centre, Akko

 Dancing in Jaffa – film review

Cherry and I went to see this film for Cherry’s birthday, and we were so glad we did. Pierre Dulaine has done an amazing task getting more than 2000 children by now, of both Jewish and Palestinian origins, dancing together within the Jaffa community. The film charts the course of one of these groups of around 30 children on a 12 week programme, from tentative first steps to giving a full competition performance at the end. Getting inner city children mixed boys and girsl aged 12 to do ballroom dancing is a difficult task at the best of times . Getting Jewish and Palestinian children to dance together is an amazing achievement. When you see these children with a mixture of shyness, sullenness, difficult backgrounds suddenly smiling and getting up to dance, it lifts your heart.

Pierre Dulaine comes from a mixed background with Palestinian mother and Irish father, and has been dancing and teaching dance for over 40 years. He is a 4 times ballroom dancing world champion. You can read more about the film’s vision below.

Our Vision

Although set in Israel, our film is ultimately about one man’s hopeful endeavour to shift the paradigm and stop the hate.
More than anything, we hope that 
Dancing in Jaffa can help transcend geographic and cultural boundaries by raising awareness of the challenges involved in dealing with hatred, while also proving that change is always possible, even in the direst of situations.

The film demonstrates the powerful role that the arts, and dance in particular, can play in enabling children to overcome prejudice and build strong personal ties with one another. Through his work, Pierre has demonstrated that the Dancing Classrooms method can be easily and successfully replicated worldwide.

Pierre has created a fun and challenging tool to generate behavioural change. Hate starts at a young age. If we can wipe it out early on by teaching mutual respect and understanding, we can encourage children to find their own ways to bridge chasms through the arts and community service.

Our overall goal is to have Dancing Classrooms in every school, in every city, in every country and bring change worldwide. Our film happens to take place in Jaffa but both the film and the program transcend geographic boundaries and can be utilized worldwide.

Forthcoming Events

Anne Frank Day – on the theme of Courage

Poem written by Michael Rosen, Poet Laureate, for the first Anne Frank Tree Planting Ceremony in 1998

We hope that anyone who knows this tree will remember Anne Frank

We hope that anyone who knows this tree will remember how from her attic window

Anne Frank watched a tree growing outside and was so moved and entranced

She couldn’t speak

We hope that anyone who knows of this tree will remember how Anne Frank lost her life

We hope that anyone who knows of this tree will never let such things happen again

We hope that anyone who knows of this tree will have as much hope in their hearts and minds as Anne Frank did .

———————————————————————————————————————–

Quote from Anne Frank’s Diary, 13 May 1944

My dearest Kitty,

Yesterday was Father’s birthday, Father and Mother’s nineteenth wedding anniversary, a day without the cleaning lady…and the sun was shining as its never shone before on 1944. Our chestnut tree is in full bloom. Its covered with leaves and is even more beautiful than last year.

Simchat Ben

Alison and Marc Turner cordially invite you to the Simchat Ben (celebration

of a son) following the birth of our beautiful baby

Isaac George William Edward Turner

(Yitzhak Naftali ben Yisrael v Simchah)

 Shabbat morning service with Rabbi Danny Rich

Herefordshire Jewish Community

in Hereford

The service will be taken by Rabbi Danny Rich, Chief Executive of Liberal Judaism assisted by others from the Herefordshire Jewish Community, relatives and friends.

It will be followed by a dairy kiddush and a kosher dairy buffet. On the Saturday afternoon there will be a houseparty at our house starting after lunch.

Limmud in the Woods

Exploring Jewish life… Radical Simplicity. 
August bank holiday weekend 27 – 31 August 2015

Limmud in the Woods is a unique event. We spend 5 days building our own community in the countryside, sleeping under canvas and experiencing top quality Jewish learning, activities in the great outdoors and events late into the night.

Cot £185 – 5 days £100 – 2 days £60 – one day (if booked by 19 June)

South West Regional Shabbaton Swindon, Saturday November 26 2015 including HJC. Communities involved will include Bristol, Gloucestershire, Oxford, Reading, Wessex and Herefordshire. Do mark this date in your diary as we hope to contribute to this day.

HJC Diary of Events

Date

Event

Time

Place

Sunday 7 June

Liberal Judaism ‘Day of Celebration’

9.30 –

5 p.m.

Liberal Jewish Synagogue, St. John’s Wood Road, London, NW8 7HA 

Saturday 11 July

Shabbat Service and Baby Blessing for Isaac Turner led by Rabbi Danny Rich

11 a.m.

Hereford 

Sunday 13 September

Rededication of tombstones, followed by evening Rosh Hashanah service

t.b.c.

6.30 p.m.

Hereford Cemetery

Then at Andrea’s house

Tuesday 22 September

Yom Kippur Kol Nidrei service- led by Julian Brown

7 p.m.

Ledbury venue t.b.c.

27th – 31st August

Limmud in the Woods

Horley Scout Camp, Banbury, OX15 6AU

26 November

South West Regional Shabbaton

Swindon

STOP PRESS

Anyone who is concerned about plans for two new broiler chicken factories in Herefordshire’s Golden Valley and wishes to sign a petition on this. See: https://secure.avaaz.org/en/stop_the_factory_farms_her/?bcJBibb&v=59710

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 July

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 wds, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes small and below 1 Mb. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

HJC Newsletter April/May 2015 – Pesach Edition

Editorial

As I write this we are approaching Pesach, a Festival of Freedom. Our communal Seder is always a time when we remember those in other communities and other times in our history, who are not, or were not, as free as we are in Herefordshire Community. It’s a time both to celebrate our freedom and to do what we can to bring about the freedom of others. It’s also an opportunity for us to develop the freedom from the limitations we impose on ourselves. Taking that first step is sometimes the hardest, as was the case for that first Hebrew to enter the Red Sea when the waters parted in the Pesach story.

There are some important events to look forward to in our calendar, once Pesach has ended. They include a Baby naming ceremony for Alison and Marc Turner’s son, Isaac which will be held on 11 July. For this event we hope Rabbi Danny Rich will be present. However prior to that we have our AGM on Sunday10 May where we hope to have lunch together at a pub, which is a new venture for HJC, and should be an enjoyable event for our community as well as a practical one.

I wish everyone a happy, healthy and enjoyable Pesach, and Chag Sameach,

Julian Brown

Chair chat

Purim service

We had a wonderful Purimspiel using Rabbi Anna’s “Megillah Musical” with tunes from well known shows. Although there was some initial reluctance to take on roles, we eventually had an all star cast with Cherry and Jonathan displaying hidden talents as Vashti and Haman respectively. It was great to see everyone enjoying themselves but Anna also reminded us of the less savoury aspects of the Purim story, which is why for many years it wasn’t celebrated by Liberal Judaism.

Future Events

Just to whet your appetite. Following our traditional communal Seder on Thursday April 9, we will be holding our AGM on Sunday May 10 at 12 noon at a local hostelry. The idea is that we hold our meeting between 11.30 and 1 p.m., followed by a hearty Sunday lunch. As I mentioned at the Purim service, there are some important proposed changes to our constitution that we would like to discuss with you. Venue to be decided upon but please keep the date free.

We will have another Shabbat morning service at Colwall with Rabbi Anna on Saturday May 16.

Last, but by no means least, there is Isaac Turner’s baby naming ceremony and Shabbat service on Saturday July 11 in Hereford.

Sir Martin Gilbert

I was very sorry to hear of the recent death of this great historian. His output was prodigious, writing an eight volume biography of Churchill and over 80 books on twentieth century history. All his works, including the many on various aspects of Judaism and Israel, are extremely well written, detailed and objective. My favourite volumes are “A Holocaust Journey”, in which he took a group of his postgraduate students around eastern Europe to visit sites connected with the Shoah, and “Letters to Auntie Fori” in which he told the history of Judaism in bite sized letter chunks originally written to an Indian lady he had adopted as an aunt.

Daniel Taub, Israel’s ambassador to Britain, summed up his contribution: “If modern Jewish history has a voice, it is the voice of Sir Martin Gilbert. It is hard to think of anyone who has done as much to document, to educate and to inspire, with passion and authenticity, the history of the Jews in modern times, the tragedy of the Shoah, the struggles of Jews in Arab lands and the Soviet Union, and the inspiring return of the Jewish people to statehood in the land of Israel. These were but a part of his extraordinary corpus of 80 works, which not only brought him recognition as a world class historian in many different fields, but enabled him to see and describe Jewish history against the canvass of world events.”

Jewish Identity

The old question – do we constitute a “people”, a civilisation/culture or are we “just” a religion? The best attempted answer for me to this came in an article by Brian Klug which Angela kindly sent to me:

“Why is “Jewish” the Houdini among identities: always escaping the boxes in which it is put?

Because the idea of “the people of God” is a conundrum and you cannot confine a conundrum to a box. The people (particular) of God (universal): it is a kind of surd: a quantity that does not add up or make sense, a formula that is always liable to split apart at the seams if Judaism forgets either element. When it forgets that it is a people it becomes a pale imitation of Christianity, turning itself into a kind of church. And when it forgets its

larger, universal aspect, it becomes just another nation or ethnos on the earth. But suppose the idea of “the people of God” remaining in tension with itself, holds: then what we get is a people defined by a surd: an absurd people: a particular people with a universal significance. That’s us, the Jewish people.”

Mark Walton

Community News

Alison & Marc Turner write:

Invitation to Baby Blessing

Alison and Marc Turner would like to invite everyone to the blessing and welcoming ceremony for their son Isaac George William Edward Turner. This will be on Saturday 11 July 2015 which is Shabbat Pinchas. The service will be at 11am and we are honoured to welcome Rabbi Danny Rich to take the service and baby blessing. Rabbi Danny Rich is the Chief Executive of Liberal Judaism where Alison works as a very part-time Archivist. The service will be in Hereford, contact Mark Walton for details. All are very welcome to meet baby Isaac and hear the story of why we chose the names we did and so many of them. There will be a special Kiddush and we hope to have visiting relatives and friends and good weather.

Hen Bradshaw writes:

It is with great sadness I have to say I am leaving you all and moving to Derbyshire. I have Young Onset Frontal Temporal Dementia, which gives me a life expectancy of approximately 8 years, and because my husband is much younger than me (his 40 to my 60) we thought that him being near his family for help was better than staying here with no-one but my friends. Don’t worry though, Nottingham has a Liberal Community and I aim to continue my studies.

Our new flat is in a lovely little village 4 miles from Chesterfield called Duckmanton. Our new home is warden assisted, 1 Markham Court, Duckmanton, Chesterfield S44 5HH. Please keep in touch, by post or, if you want to visit then email henbradshaw@gmail.com.

We wish Hen well in her new home, and would like to thank her and her children for their contributions to Learning Circle meetings, services and community events.

Learning Circle Corner

The Learning Circle group in Monmouth has decided not to continue with the Access to Liberal Judaism adult learning course. They will be meeting in future as a more informal group discussing various films and books of Jewish interest. If you would like to join them, please contact Mark Walton. The Learning Circle in Hereford will be continuing with the adult learning course after Pesach. We will begin with the Jewish Thought module, this comprises Jewish Identity, God, Prayer and Eternal life. Regular readers might note that we did this one last time, but due to illnesses and other factors like midwife and hospital appointments, we missed many of the sessions last year, so have decided to have another go at this module. Anyone who wishes to join is welcome, please contact Alison Turner.

HJC Website The website has been relaunched as a blog, it is still at http://www.herefordshirejc.org/ and now it has capacity for many more blog posts on anything of interest to us as a community. Please take a look at the new site and let me know if you would like to write something. I am still learning my way round it all, so there will be enhancements in due course.

Alison Turner

Maya Brown writes:

‘Oil Vey!’

A new organisation has sprung up, as a result of Jewish young people, interested in and passionate about environmental issues. Oil Vey, a name which was first suggested as a joke, is expanding. It is an organisation which will work on getting movements/organisations (or in this case synagogues) to divest-taking their investments away from and not investing in fossil fuels. This is similar to the student run fossil free campaign (run by People and Planet Groups), in which students campaign for their universities to divest from fossil fuels. This is all part of a larger movement of 350°. Org which started this idea off to get power away from the fossil fuel companies. It was figured out that the environment could not handle fossil fuels going beyond a certain amount, the temperature could not go beyond 2°, as our climate cannot handle the amount of CO2 in our atmosphere going beyond 350 parts per million. It is currently at 400. The fossil fuel companies are the ones that hold the power. If they do not stop hunting for fossil fuels, when the amount they have in their reserves is already too much, then the world we live in will soon become uninhabitable and dangerous, generations of humans will no longer be able to inhabit the earth. It is not the earth we are trying save, but the human race and all other inhabitants of the earth.

So, changing our lifestyles on its own will not achieve this goal and is difficult and blame giving. We must target fossil fuel companies. Oil vey came to Sheffield University J Soc (Jewish Society) and gave a workshop about the environment, and how Jews are meant to look after it, giving some quotes from the bible- the basic message being that we are stewards and are meant to care for the earth and not destroy it. We made a plan of action, as to how we can tackle work with Sheffield’s Jewish communities to divest from fossil fuels (if they in fact do invest) and leading on from that other faith organisations. This idea is not something you can do only through Hereford community (though not sure how this would work in practice) but through any other organisations you are part of. To find out more just got 350.0rg. Oil Vay are on facebook but I think do not have a website yet although they are setting up a blog.

Maya Brown

Letter from Mohamed Fahili, and Clare Lassman at Charles Clore Jewish Arab Community Centre, Acco – our Israeli Charity

Dear Friends

They say every cloud has a silver lining but for Fahili and me it has been hard to see one in the aftermath of the Israeli election. While we obviously accept the democratic process, it is hard to ignore or accept the racism directed at the more than 20% of Israeli citizens who are Arab. Surely most Israelis want to live in a society where every person is treated equally regardless of religion or background?

Imagine if Marine Le Pen had galvanised the French electorate to vote for her by warning that the Jews were voting in droves. Such language should galvanise people like us – who cherish justice, mutual respect and the dream that all its citizens should live in harmony – to action.

Fahili and I have worked together side by side for more than six years along with Jewish and Arab Israeli youth workers, teachers and trainers to serve the poor of Akko regardless of their faith. We endeavour to leave Politics and Religion at the door, enabling people to get to know one another through common interests and human concerns. We worked through the Akko riots in 2008, through terrorist acts in Israel and wars in Gaza. We have shared hopes for change – no more so than in the last few weeks – and work tirelessly to promote the Centre’s vision of shared living.

Please help us make the Centre a silver lining at this time. Since last week we have had offers of help from Israeli businessmen who want to do something to ensure that Arab youth have the tools to economically play a full part of society. We have had two donations from supporters who are very upset by the divisiveness of the election. Please add your support. We do make a difference and now, more than ever, we need to extend our services and outreach.

We intend to make our Centre a more active grass-roots MEETING PLACE, further reaching out to people from Akko and the Galil, and also welcoming groups from abroad who share our vision of a more just society. In the last week we welcomed 55 Conservative and Reform student rabbis from the US as well as 16 journalists from Germany and Austria. They saw first-hand the value of the work that we do. By bringing people together at a personal, educational and social level we can perhaps create a society that will withstand existential threats from within and beyond our borders. Please take a look at our new English website – ajcenter.org.il, or go straight to our online donation page at http://ajcenter.org.il/donate/

Thank you for your ongoing support.

Mohammad Fahili and Clare Lassman

Pesach Recipe

Foolproof K’neidlach (matzo balls)

Perhaps you have the perfect recipe for k’neidlach, or on the other hand you may have had that experience of making perfectly shaped matzo balls, only for these to change shape or disintegrate completely when put into soup. This recipe comes from chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s book, Jerusalem, but surprisingly the recipe was perfected by his Palestinian partner Sami Tamimi.

K’neidlach Recipe (makes 12 – 15)

2 large eggs

40g margarine or chicken fat, melted and allowed to cool a bit.

2 tbsp finely chopped parsley

75g matzo meal

4 tbsp soda water

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method

Whisk the eggs in a medium bowl until frothy. Whisk in the melted margarine, or fat, then ½ teaspoonful of salt, some black pepper and the parsley. Gradually stir in the matzo meal, followed by the soda water, and stir to a uniform paste. Cover the bowl and chill the batter until cold and firm, at least an hour or two and up to a day ahead.

Line a baking sheet with cling film. Using your wet hands and a spoon, shape the batter into balls the size of small walnuts, and place on the baking sheet. Drop the matzo balls into a large pot of gently boiling salted water. Cover partially n with a lid and reduce the heat to low. Simmer gently until tender, about 30 minutes.

We’ve done this for the last two years with great success, so hope any others who try this enjoy the result.

Julian Brown & Cherry Wolfe

Book Review: My Promised Land by Ari Shavit

This is a deep, honest, and challenging book, but very well worth reading for anyone who wants to understand the psychology of modern Israel and the wider context in which Israel exists. Ari Shavit is a columnist for the newspaper Haaretz – the Israeli equivalent of the Guardian – and has both very personal experiences to relate, as well as having done extensive research, over many years, into different facets of Israel’s existence. The contents of the book ranges from Zionism at the end of the 19th century when Shavit’s great-grandfather, Herbert Bentwich, first visited Israel, through the development of the kibbutz movement and the harshness of life in Palestine in the early 20th century, to the social and economic growth of the newly established state, and modern day issues of settlers, Israeli Arabs, the Ashkenazi – Sephardi divide, and much, much more. There is no aspect of Israeli life, you feel, that he does not address. As a diaspora Jew, who never the less has visited Israel many times, I felt that this is an Israel I had really only skimmed the surface of in my own experience.

Shavit’s writing is fresh and absorbing: through a series of personal stories of those who’ve been at the forefront of each of these different aspects of life in Israel, he takes you to the core issues of what makes Israel tick. Whatever view you have of Israel and the Middle East, this book will surely change your thinking.

Julian Brown

Food Bank Contributions

It’s good if we can keep up our contributions to the food bank, especially as homelessness and food poverty continue to be in the news. Remember you can include toiletries and cleaning items, as well as tinned, dried and long life food items. Just add a couple of items when you do your next shop. Please bring to our next Shabbat service on 16th May.

Other Events of interest

Thames Valley Day Limmud to be held Monday May 4 (bank holiday) in Maidenhead.

It looks to be a very interesting programme featuring Clive Lawton, Rabbis Jonathan Romain and Norman Solomon and many others. See: http://limmud.org/day/thames-valley/

Liberal Judaism’s “Day of Celebration” at the Liberal Jewish Synagogue in London on Sunday June 7 will be on theme of our relationship with Israel. See: www.liberaljudaism.org/events-activities/lj-day-of-celebration.html

 

HJC Diary of Events

Date                           Event                      Time        Place

Thursday 9th April Communal Seder 6.30 p.m. Parish Hall, Belmont, Hereford

Monday 4 May Thames Valley Day Limmud 9.30 – 6.15p.m. Maidenhead

Sunday 10th May HJC AGM +Communal Pub lunch 11.30 a.m. Hereford Pub t.b.c.

Saturday 16th May Shabbat Service led by Rabbi Anna Gerrard 11 a.m. Ale House, Colwall

Sunday 7 June Liberal Judaism ‘Day of Celebration’ 9.30 – 5 p.m. Liberal Jewish Synagogue St. John’s Wood Road, London, NW8 7HA,

Saturday 11 July Shabbat Service and Baby Blessing for Isaac Turner led by Rabbi Danny Rich 11 a.m. Hereford.

Deadline for next newsletter will be 15 May

Please send in contributions in WORD or pdf format if possible, but articles sent in by post are also welcome. In general contributions should be no longer than 500 – 750 wds, but longer contributions may be included if appropriate. Pictures also welcome, but please try to keep image sizes down. All contributions are welcome but depending on format, the editor reserves the right to edit or hold over to a future edition if needed.

For further information please contact our Chair:

Mark Walton mark.walton@bridgescentre.org.uk Tel: 01594 530721